Beat up an egg on a plate, season it with a little salt and pepper. Have some white crumbs ready in a sheet of paper. Hold a cutlet by the end of the bone and brush it all over with the beaten egg (see Fig. 2). Next lay it on the crumbs and coat it with them. This is best done by taking hold of the paper in both hands and shaking first one side of it and then the other(see Fig. 3). The cutlet must on no account be touched with the fingers before it is coated with crumbs, for wherever is touched the egg will be removed and no crumbs will be able to adhere; thus the case of egg and crumb will not be complete, and there will be a part through which the juices of the meat will escape, and cause the frying fat to splutter.

Now flatten the crumbs on with a dry knife. Heat two ounces of butter or beef dripping in a frying-pan until it nearly stops bub-bling; lay in two or three cutlets at a time, and fry them a bright golden brown on each side. The time required will vary according to the thickness of the cutlet. If liked underdone, they will probably take about five to seven minutes; if well cooked, from eight to ten. Re-scrape the ends of the bones, for they must be quite clean and free from crumbs. Place a tiny paper cutlet frill round the end of each, and arrange them in a semicircle on a hot dish, the bone ends slanting up-wards. It will probably be necessary to place a small piece of bread under the first one to keep it in position.

If liked, strain some tomato or brown sauce round, and a small heap of cooked peas or macedoine of vegetable makes a pretty garnish.

Fig. 2. Hold a cutlet by the end of the bone and brush it all over with the beaten egg the fingers

Fig. 2. Hold a cutlet by the end of the bone and brush it all over with the beaten egg the fingers

Fig. 3. Lay the cutlet on the crumbs in a piece of white paper, to avoid touching it wit

Fig. 3. Lay the cutlet on the crumbs in a piece of white paper, to avoid touching it wit"