Because, according to her own confession, the whole social surroundings of her life were repellent to her, Lady Constance Lytton, sister of the present Earl of Lytton, and second daughter of the first earl, who was Viceroy of India from 1876 to 1880, became a Suffragist. She has been in prison several times on account of her participation in militant methods, and in order that the fact of her belonging to the nobility should not secure for her any special privileges she once served a sentence of fourteen days in Walton Gaol, Liverpool, disguised as an ordinary working woman, and passing under the name of " Anne Warton." A serious-minded, deep-thinking woman, Lady Constance is devoting her life to the cause of women's rights, and whatever view one may hold on the subject, one cannot help admiring her courage and perseverance in the cause she has espoused. Her brother, Lord Lytton, who, in 1902, married a daughter of the late Sir Trevor Chichele-plowden, is also an enthusiastic supporter of the Suffragist movement, which numbers in the ranks of its adherents not only the leisured few of the upper classes, but also representative workers from both the educated professions and the ranks of labour.

Lady Constance Lytton Elliott & Fry

Lady Constance Lytton Elliott & Fry