As leader of the Women's Social Work of the Salvation Army since 1884, Mrs. Bramwell Booth, who married the eldest son of General Booth in 1882, is nearly as important a person as her husband. Thousands of women have to thank Mrs. Bramwell Booth for a fresh start in life, for it was she who organised, and is still responsible for, the rescue work amongst women - one of the most useful and praiseworthy features of the work of the Salvation Army. Before her marriage Mrs. Booth did a great deal of work in the slums of Paris, and it is doubtful if any other woman knows so much about the darker and more tragic side of life. Mr. and Mrs. Booth have seven children, and it must be a source of much gratification to their parents attention being " Patience Sparhawk and Her Times," published in 1897. Mrs. Atherton was born at San Francisco, and began writing when quite young. She has a great love for California; indeed, her books are the literature of California. She is one of those authors who love art for art's sake, and has been heard to remark: "I have no hobby except writing. That, too, is what my career has been composed of." Mrs. Atherton, who can claim Benjamin Franklin amongst her ancestors, has one daughter, and resides for the most part in America, although she is fond of France. She married, early in life, a Chilian gentleman, Mr. Atherton, who died a few years after the marriage, and Mrs. Atherton has remained a widow ever since.

Mrs. Bramwell Booth E. Mills

Mrs. Bramwell Booth E. Mills

to know that each one of them is enthusiastically following in their footsteps,and devoting their time to religious and social work among the masses