Examiner in Dressmaking, Tailoring, French Pattern Modelling, Plain Needle-work and Millinery, of the Teachers in Training at the University College of South Wales and Monmouthshire, Cardiff, the London Technical Examination Centre, etc. Author of'" Up-to-date Dresscutting and Drafting" also " The Practical Work of Dressmaking and Tailoring"

Marking the Design on the Material - "Pouncing" - Painting the Design - How to Draft the "Revers" - To Cut the Canvas for the "Revers" - To Make the "Revers" - Fitting the Wrap The Fastenings

Place the wrap smoothly on the table, right side uppermost.

Commence at the centre-back, and place the pricked pattern round half the neck, in the position desired for the trimming, allowing sufficient for a margin beyond it, and also for turning up the edge of the wrap. The width of the margin should be measured and marked at intervals round the neck, down the front, and round the bottom. When the pattern has been quite correctly placed on the material, fasten both firmly to the table with "push pins," so that neither of them may move during the process of "pouncing," otherwise double lines may be formed on the material, which would be found very confusing.

For the "pouncing" use either white or coloured powdered chalk-or sometimes powdered charcoal is used-according to whether the material be light or dark.

The proper pouncing implement is a thing something like a small drumstick, stuffed and covered with cloth, and must be dipped into the powder and rubbed lightly over the pricked holes of the pattern, so that the powder may penetrate through to the material.

As the home-worker may not be able to get the " pouncing" implement and powdered chalk, she can take a piece of chalk-white or coloured-and with a penknife scrape a small quantity over the pricked pattern, then take a small piece of soft muslin or other soft material, fold it into a small pad, and very lightly smear the powdered chalk over the design.

Remove the pins, and casefully take off the tracing-paper, and shake the loose chalk from it; the design should now appear distinctly outlined on the material. Do not disturb the wrap, but very gently blow the superfluous chalk off it.

Now proceed to paint in the pattern with a small sable-hair brush and water-colour paint of a contrasting colour.

N.B.-The rougher and more hairy the

Diagram 1. To draft a pattern for the  revers,  place the square along the slanting line surface of the material the finer the brush should be, so that the paint may sink in between the fibres

Diagram 1. To draft a pattern for the revers, place the square along the slanting line surface of the material the finer the brush should be, so that the paint may sink in between the fibres. The painting must be done as finely as possible, as the lines must all be covered by the trimming.

As soon as the paint is dry the wrap can be moved, and the pricked pattern pinned on it again further on, taking care to make the lines meet exactly, so that the join may not be seen; the same care must be taken in arranging the corner pattern. When the pattern has been painted on to the wrap it is ready for the trimming to be sewn on.

In the finished sketch on page 1719. Vol. III., the trimming is satin piping. Instructions for making this were given on pages 233 and 234, Vol. I. This piping requires to be very carefully tacked on, and on no account must it be allowed to "twist," or it will give it a "dragged" appearance, and spoil its look.

Take a fine needle and fine silk or cotton-preferably the former-and tack it. neatly from the right side through the centre to the wrap. Small stitches are necessary, so as to fix the piping securely and evenly over the lines of tracing so that none of them may show.

N.B.-Any silk that is slightly faded or soiled can be used up for this tacking.

When all the trimming has been tacked on, it must be sewn on very neatly with strong silk to match. This can be done from the wrong side of the wrap with small running stitches and an occasional back stitch, care being taken not to draw the thread too tight, and so give the work a puckered appearance, and not to allow any of the stitches to show on the right side; or it can be sewn on from the right side by very neat "slip-stitching" - slip the needle from the wrong side of the wrap into and along the under side of the piping, and make a short, straight stitch-as in running-thereby taking a firm hold of the piping, draw the needle through gently, take up a small piece of the material under the piping, and again slip the needle into and along the under side of the piping, and so on.

" Slip-stitching " is worked from right to left.

When the trimming has been sewn on, remove the tacking, cut every stitch before it is drawn out, so as not to damage the satin. If the trimming has been at all puckered in sewing it on, and therefore requires pressing, this must be done from the wrong side of the wrap - over an inverted iron. The piping would be spoiled if it were pressed flat on the table.

The "Revers"

It is advisable for the amateur worker to draft a pattern for the "revers" on paper, from which to cut out the velvet, etc. To

Diagram 2. The rever as it should appear when cut out do this

Diagram 2. The " revers" as it should appear when cut out do this, draw a perpendicular line twelve inches in length, and from the top of it draw a short horizontal line two inches in length, from the end of it draw a slanting line to touch the horizontal line at the bottom. Place the square along this slanting line seven inches up, and draw a line three inches in length along the " short arm " of the square. This gives the widest part and the point of the " revers."

Remove the square and draw a slanting line to touch the top of the horizontal line, and another to touch the bottom of the perpendicular line. Draw a curve within each of these, as shown on Diagram 1.

These curves give the outer edge for the "revers." Cut out the pattern along the slanting line and on the two curves, and it should appear as in Diagram 2.

To Cut Out Thec Anvast0

Place and pin the pattern on the canvas in the position shown in Diagram 3-i.e., the top point two inches from the selvedge, or straight edge, and the bottom point half an inch from it-outline the two curves with chalk and along the slanting line with a tracing-wheel, and cut it out on the chalk lines and half an inch beyond the wheel - marks, to allow for turning.

Cut out the second "revers" from the first, or, if the piece of canvas is large enough, fold it double, and cut both out together.

Place the pattern on the velvet, and pin it with steel pins, or needles, in the position shown in Diagram 4-i.e., two inches from the selvedge at the top and half an inch at the bottom, with the pile of the velvet smoothing upwards-and cut it out, allowing half an inch for turning all round. Cut out the second piece of velvet from the first, being careful to place it in exactly the same position as regards the selvedge, and to "face," also that the "pile" in both pieces smoothes upwards.

Cut out the lining the same as the velvet.

To Make the "Revers"

Place the velvet on the canvas with the inner edges level, and tack it with fine silk, to avoid marking it. On the outside edge notch the velvet-as it is curved-and turn it over the canvas, and herringbone it down, taking care not to let the stitches go through to the right side.

Tack the lining over the canvas, the inside edges level. On the outside edge notch and turn it in to within about a quarter of an inch of the edge of the velvet, tack and fell it neatly to it.

N.B.-When working on velvet, it is advisable to hold a small cutting under the thumb of the left hand, to avoid marking it.

Put the wrap on a dress-stand, or the person for whom it is being made, and place the " revers " in position on it, as illustrated in the finished sketch, pin it on-with steel pins -the raw edges of the "revers" and of the wrap quite level.

Take it off the stand, measure, and pin on the second "revers" exactly to correspond. Tack on both "revers" with silk, and then stitch them on about a quarter of an inch from the edge.

Turn down the edge of the "revers" and wrap together-about half an inch-and continue turning down the edge of the wrap evenly all round, and herringbone the raw edge to the interlining. Be careful not to take any stitches through to the right side.

The fastening must now be sewn on. "Mantle hooks" should be used-these are slightly bowed, and do not come unfastened so easily as a straight hook-and are sold on

Diagram 3. Pin the  pattern on the canvas, the top point two inches from the selvedge

Diagram 3. Pin the- pattern on the canvas, the top point two inches from the selvedge

Selvedge of  Velvet

Selvedge of- Velvet"

"Pile to smooth upwards cards at 2d. and 3d. per card, according to the quality.

The first hook should be sewn on just below the "revers," the top of it should reach to within about a quarter of an inch of the front right edge of the wrap.

The eye on the opposite side should project about a quarter of an inch beyond the edge; they must be sewn on securely to the turned down edge, being careful not to take the stitches through to the right side, and when the wrap is fastened the two front edges should exactly meet, but should not overlap.

Sew on as many hooks as desired, about three or four inches apart.