New Oil Lamps-the Combination Standard and Bracket Electric Lamp-hand-made Copper

Lamps-Cloisonne Glass Shades-pottery Lamps

Like everything else in the house, lamps, whether for oil or electric light, have been undergoing a beautifying process of recent years. Form and decoration are considered as important here as elsewhere.

For oil lamps glass has gone out of favour, and the brass lamps are of far more diverse, also of lighter and more graceful, designs. The oxidised silver finish, which is so popular for all metal-work, is very much used, and a

A standard flower lamp for the centre of a dining table. The lighting is given by three concealed bulbs under a pretty shade. The lamp is arranged so as not to obscure the view of the guests

A standard flower lamp for the centre of a dining-table. The lighting is given by three concealed bulbs under a pretty shade. The lamp is arranged so as not to obscure the view of the guests

A standard flower lamp for the centre of a dining table. The lighting is given by three concealed bulbs under a pretty shade. The lamp is arranged so as not to obscure the view of the guests

A standard flower lamp for the centre of a dining-table. The lighting is given by three concealed bulbs under a pretty shade. The lamp is arranged so as not to obscure the view of the guests duller shade of silver, known technically as "old French grey," is also very popular. Oxidised copper, too, has a good effect, and is very well liked. The old brass finish resembling that of antique candlesticks looks very well in some rooms, while rooms in the French style seem to demand something in old French gold or ormolu. The difference between these two is that in the latter parts of the decoration are highly polished.

IV. & S. Benson & Co., Ltd.

Designs in electric lamps are apt to be extremely simple for ordinary use, especially the singularly convenient small standard table-lamp. It may, however, take other forms, in which it becomes a veritable objet d'art. In this last guise it makes one of the nicest wedding presents it is possible to give a young couple.

The simplest lamp of all, of course, is the little tripod that can be bought complete with shade-holder and silk shade for 8s. 6d. Another version of this is the combination standard and bracket lamp. One foot of the tripod has a loop, by means of which the lamp can be hung on the wall, and there is also a hook in the metal decoration for suspending the lamp

A hand wrought copper lamp of original design, made by the

A hand-wrought copper lamp of original design, made by the

Birmingham Guild, Ltd.

An attractive cloisonne glass lamp shade, edged with a green bead fringe. This design is suitable for a table standard lamp

An attractive cloisonne glass lamp-shade, edged with a green bead fringe. This design is suitable for a table standard lamp from the bar of a bed. The stand alone in this case costs 11s., the shade being extra.

Rashlegh Phipps & co

A Crown porcelain vase, ingeniously converted into a beautiful oil lamp by the workers of the Duchess of Sutherland's Cripples' Guild, Ltd.

A Crown porcelain vase, ingeniously converted into a beautiful oil lamp by the workers of the Duchess of Sutherland's Cripples' Guild, Ltd.

Diffused lighting with holoplane glass globes is so very much the fashion for dinner-tables that standard lamps are not very often seen in this capacity except at hotels. Some people, however, still prefer this style of lighting, and a popular form of it is the flower-lamp. It is made with a cut-glass flower-holder, and the lights; also encased in cut glass, spring out of it. Another very charming design is seen on the previous page. This lamp is a patent. The idea is that it should not obstruct the view at all, so the three uprights are carried to a level just above the heads of the guests. The lighting is effected by three concealed bulbs, softened by a pretty painted shade. The centre of the lamp is arranged as a holder for a flower-vase. A really charming dinner-table decoration, especially for a round table, is thus formed.

A very usual form of lamp, of course, is the pillar lamp of gilt-coloured brass, but to stand about as an odd lamp on a drawing-room table people generally, prefer something more uncommon, and considerable taste may be displayed in the choice of a really beautiful thing, such as the hand-made copper lamps made in Birmingham, after very quaint and pleasing designs, which may be bought from about 16s.

In another lamp the shade is the chief charm.

The lamp itself is a simple bar of metal which best serves to display a cloisonne glass shade, which is frequently wonderfully attractive. The colouring is very rich and quaint, and shows sometimes little floral wreath patterns on a plain ground. These shades have a good deal of green about them, and are edged with a green bead fringe. It is interesting to know that the way in which this charming effect is obtained is by means of a decoration of tiny glass beads placed between two layers of glass. This method has long been in use for hall lamps, but, in new and delightful designs, has now come to the fore on the table standard lamp, an example of which can be bought for about 2.

The Duchess of Sutherland is responsible for the idea for some very beautiful lamps made by the workers of her Cripples' Guild from Crown porcelain and pottery vases. A holder for the lamp is formed of hand-wrought silvered copper, and affixed to the vase.

A lamp in silvered copper, hand'wrought and of exquisite design, fashioned by the members of the Duchess of Sutherland's Cripples' Guild, Ltd.

A lamp in silvered copper, hand'wrought and of exquisite design, fashioned by the members of the Duchess of Sutherland's Cripples' Guild, Ltd.