One of the most popular of Irish peeresses, the Countess of Fingall, who married the Earl in 1883, has been very prominent in assisting the home industries movement, and much of the improvement in the colouring and designs of cottage-made tweeds has been due to her. Before her marriage she was Miss Mary Burke, of Dane-field, in Galway, and the story goes that, althoughlord Fingall's relatives wished him to "marry money" - for, although of ancient lineage, he did not inherit a great income - he fell in love with Miss Burke, and promptly married her. Lord Fingall and his wife spend most of their time at Killeen Castle, co. Meath, almost beneath the shadow of the palace-crowned Hill of Tara. It was built in the twelfth century, and is one of the finest specimens of Anglo-norman architecture extant.both Lord and Lady Fingall are devoted to country life, his lordship being master of the Tara Harriers.

The Countess of Fingall Photo, Lafayette

The Countess of Fingall Photo, Lafayette