An Ingenious and Novel Idea - An Easily Made Rose - La France Rose - The Cabbage Rose - How Roses can be Adapted for the Coiffure and other Decorative Purposes

One of the most charming fashions is the use of silk or ribbon roses. The latter were introduced into this country by an American girl, who found herself landed here with no money to support herself, and seeing that none of the shop windows displayed these roses, which were then being used in America, she set to work to make some and sell them to the various smart dressmakers.

Since the work has become popular, some women take lessons in rose-making, but the clever worker will be able to teach herself the pretty art by the aid of the following directions.

The easiest kind of roses to make are those seen in Fig. 1. These are delightful, either for the corsage of a young girl's evening frock or for a child's hat. Each rose is made from a small strip of silk cut on the cross, two inches wide and eleven inches long. This is folded in half, and a running thread is put along the raw edges. One end, which

Fig. 1. A bunch of silk rosebuds for a young girl's evening dress.

Fig. 1. A bunch of silk rosebuds for a young girl's evening dress.

This is the simplest form of rose to make and also one of the daintiest in appearance is to go in the centre of the rose, should be rounded off. The other end should be finished by having the raw edges folded in a little. Use 20 thread for the running, and only draw up the thread very slightly. Sew a little piece of narrow hat wire on to the rounded end to form the stalk. Then roll the silk round and round this, and secure it firmly with stitches at the base. The green part, or rose calyx, is then slipped up the wire to cover the raw edges of the silk, and the rose is finished. These green cups can be bought for 4 3/4d.the dozen, or they can be taken from old roses and used. Use up one or two smaller and narrower pieces of silk to form buds. Then secure all your little roses in a round posy with a piece of flower wire, backing them with a spray of small green leaves. To make all neat, twist a length of narrow green sarcenet ribbon around the stalks. Satin is a good fabric to use for these, but the inexpensive English silk has an even better effect, as it is softer.

Fig. 2. A  La France rose made in soft ribbon of the flower's two natural shades, the darker of which should be in the centre

Fig. 2. A " La France " rose made in soft ribbon of the flower's two natural shades, the darker of which should be in the centre

The next kind of rose (Fig. 2), which is rather more difficult to manage, is made of soft faille ribbon, two inches and a half wide. If made in the natural shades, this has exactly the appearance of a real flower, so that one is quite tempted to try the scent of it. A great point in getting this natural effect is to use two shades of ribbon with only a tone difference between them, the darker one in the centre. To procure these, it may be necessary to purchase them at two different shops, for, as a rule, the same shop does not keep two shades so nearly alike. The thinner and commoner the ribbon the better, as it gives a more delicate look, provided, of course, that it is all silk. It should cost about 2|d. or 3|d. the yard.

To start the rose, secure a little wad of wool on to one end of a piece of wire, and cover it with the ribbon. Cut off seven pieces of the darker shade of ribbon, five inches Fold one of these in half, and gather raw edges together. Turn back the top edge of the loop thus formed, rolling it over a little more at the corners than the center, and stitch them towards the middle of the ribbon. The petal thus formed must be rolled and stitched on to the wire at the base of the little wad. The remaining six petals are gathered up, and sewn on one after the other. Outside these should come about ten petals in the lighter shade. When this is done the corner of each petal turned down and caught invisibly with a single stitch in sewing silk to match the rose. The best way is just to pull the silk through and tie it. Use the calyx of an old rose to finish the back of the flower, and cover the stalk with india-rubber tubing, which is to be bought fo.. 4§d. the length. Make a bud in the same way that the centre of the rose is formed. only using a shorter piece of ribbon. Now mount the rose and bud into a spray with some leaves, and your task is finished. It very pale pink ribbon is used, the effect will be just that of a La France rose. Yellow roses are also charming mounted with brownish leaves. Either of these look lovely on an evening gown, and one great advantage is that they are uncrushable, so that they are excellent for travelling.

Fig. 3. A novel form of millinery rose composed of piece silk cut on the cross

Fig. 3. A novel form of millinery rose composed of piece silk cut on the cross. A centre of satin or a few velvet petals can be added with good effect gathered up, rounded at each edge, and sewn round and round on a lino

Fig. 4. How the petals of the rose in Fig. 3 are made. The petals are mount, beginning at the outer edge

Fig. 4. How the petals of the rose in Fig. 3 are made. The petals are mount, beginning at the outer edge

Roses for millinery purposes frequently alter in style. An effective one is the large cabbage-shaped rose seen in Fig. 3. This is composed of piece silk on the cross, with the centre of satin, or a few velvet petals look well. Odd scraps of silk can easily be used, and the petals can be of any length, the outer ones going right around the rose, and the inner ones rather shorter. The depth of the petals is also not important. Those in our illustrations are two inches and a half in depth. First cut two circular pieces of lino to form a mount. Gather up your long petals, rounding them at each end, or, rather, starting at the outer folded edge, and turning the thread at right angles at the inner edge, as seen in Fig. 4. St these petals round and round on the lino mount, beginning at the outer edge. When finished, secure some rose-leaves at the back of the lino mount. Any colour can be used with good result for these roses; the one shown is in lavender blue taffetas and satin.

A very smart one may be made of moire silk in shot red and pink.

If preferred, this rose can be used with leaves also made up out of scraps of silk.

Some novelties are in the form of hair slides and pins decorated with little roses made of gold or silver tissue. To make these it may be cheaper to buy a wide ribbon rather than tissue by the yard. Cut some tiny little pieces off these on the cross, and gather them and sew them on to fine wire, as for the roses in Fig. 1. In order to have wire sufficiently fine the best way is to get ribbon wire, and cut out one of the strands. Buy a light tortoiseshell slide one inch and three-quarters across, and make ten of these tiny roses to go around it. Bind the wires on which they are made together, one over the other, to form a wreath. Make all tidy at the back with a little fold of the gold tissue. Sew the wreath on to the slide. Around the outer edge place another fold of the gold tissue, to hide where the stitches pass over the slide. Tiny ribbon roses in various colours would look charming made up in the same way. This would also form a very uncommon and dainty buckle for a hat or dress.

Fig. 5. A charming hair slide, decorated with little roses of gold or silver tissue. Ribbon roses can be used if preferred

Fig. 5. A charming hair-slide, decorated with little roses of gold or silver tissue. Ribbon roses can be used if preferred

By a careful selection of materials and shades a number of variations can be obtained.