Sauceboat of Bow porcelain, decorated in blue underglaze. The decoration on such pieces has often the appearance of being hastily executed, probably owing to the scarcity of artists available at the time

Sauceboat of Bow porcelain, decorated in blue underglaze. The decoration on such pieces has often the appearance of being hastily executed, probably owing to the scarcity of artists available at the time

From the South Kensington Museum figure scenes treated in Oriental style and colours will be found; also a hedge, or fence, with bands enclosing sprays of bamboo. Chinese emblems and symbols may be seen upon a double-handled cup in the British Museum, and in the same collection is a bottle-shaped vase with handles depending from dragon masks. This is painted with partridges and flowers in the style of Kakiyemon, the well-known Japanese artist.

Then the Chinese Blanc de Chine, found great appreciation at Bow. This was copied so admirably that, judged by decoration alone, it would be difficult to distinguish between the two. This porcelain is entirely white, and is ornamented with raised white flowers, the hawthorn blossom and branch being most frequently used, but acorns and roses on a stalk are also found.

The paste and glaze of the Chinese have the appearance of being one, and the base is generally unglazed. Upon pieces made at Bow the base is glazed, and the glaze will be found to have accumulated round the raised flowers.

If the edges of the Bow flowers are examined they will frequently be found to be worn and discoloured, having a fire-marked ap-p ea rance. This is, I believe, caused by the decomposition of some ingredient in the glaze. Such discoloration is

A large soup tureen of Bow porcelain, decorated with hawthorn blossoms in relief, in imitation of Chinese ware. The influence of Chinese and Japanese art is evident in Bow porcelain of early date

A large soup-tureen of Bow porcelain, decorated with hawthorn blossoms in relief, in imitation of Chinese ware. The influence of Chinese and Japanese art is evident in Bow porcelain of early date

From the South Kensington Museum never found upon white Chinese porcelain.

Knife and fork handles in white decorated with raised flowers were made at this factory, the forks with two or three pro n g s . These are still to be picked up, and many people who possess them are unaware of their origin.

There is in the British Museum a famous pun c h - bowl made at Bow, by the side of which is the cover of a box in which it used to be preserved. On the inside of the cover is written a long inscription, signed by Thomas Craft, who painted the bowl, and dated 1790.

Marks that may be found upon old Bow porcelain. The anchor and'dagger mark is that most commonly found

Marks that may be found upon old Bow porcelain. The anchor-and'dagger mark is that most commonly found

He says: "This bowl was made at the Bow china manufactory about the year 1760, and painted there by Mr. Thomas Craft. My cipher is in the bottom." Although a large proportion of Bow porcelain i s unmarked, a good many marks have been attributed to this factory. The anchor ac-companied by a dagger is the most common. These are painted in red. A monogram formed of the two letters T and F, sometimes reversed, i s found on some early pieces made before 1760. There is little doubt that this is the monogram of Thomas Frye, who signed some of his engravings with this monogram.

House=MovlNg

The Best Method of Moving-moving Out as Important as Moving In-how to Move Out-some

Details that Repay Attention

There are two methods of moving. By one method you go away and leave everything to other people, and risk having everything done wrongly, furniture put where you do not want it, pictures hung where they offend your eye, colours blended in a way to make you blink. By the other method, you superintend everything, and, when necessary, take a hand at hard and practical work yourself. This method, though the more tiring, is, in the long run, far more satisfactory

A Move Needs Careful Planning

You cannot avoid annoyance, discomfort, and difficulty in moving from one house or flat to another, but you can greatly minimise them by careful forethought and planning, both in connection with your moving out and your moving in-for before you can move into a new place, you must move out from the old, and it is quite as important to do this latter methodically and well as the former.

Since it is inevitable that a certain time of considerable discomfort must be gone through, the householder is wise who sees to it that the greater part of this comfortless time occurs in her old home, so that she can, with as short a delay as possible, be settled and straight in her new. Moving into a new home is like entering on the beginning of a New Year. You always hope that better luck, greater happiness, or perhaps better health, are awaiting you; and if you spend several weeks of discomfort and of being "not straight," you begin your new life with a feeling of irritation and disappointment.

The first essential, when you have decided definitely to move, is to fix on your remover. If you do not know a good, reliable firm by experience, send to three or four for tenders and estimates. But be warned that the cheapest estimate is not always the cheapest in the end.

Then settle the date of your removal, and make all your preparations revolve round that date. Of course, when you are moving on quarter day to a house or flat which is occupied until that date, your difficulties are increased tenfold; but this so seldom occurs that it is the exception, not the rule. Few people will consent to go into a new house under any circumstances until it has been redecorated throughout, and this takes from ten days upwards, according to the size of the house and the promptitude of the contractor.