The blue will frequently be found to have run. It is generally a fine deep cobalt, but upon a few somewhat rare specimens a pale shade was used.

The cabbagc-leaf jug. generally of large size and an exact counterpart of that made at Worcester, is known to have been manufactured here, as a mould of one of these articles was discovered showing the pattern and painting quite clearly.

Cups were of small size, and were generally made without handles. On the inside, at the bottom, of cups, saucers, and bowls some small flower, a pagoda, a tiny river scene, or some other device in blue underglaze may be found, and diaper and other borders were used both inside and outside. The chrysanthe mum, as seen in Chinese famille-rose decoration, is frequently found in association with a fretwork fence upon blue and white Lowestoft china.

I think it is the historian Gillingwater who records that a certain Lady Louth lent a quantity of Chinese drawings to the Lowestoft factory. This may account for the excellent designs which we find upon this porcelain. Of late a large number of beautiful pen - and - ink drawings - copies of the Chinese upon fine paper - have come to light, and may be seen at Messrs. A. B. Daniell & Son, in Wigmore Street. These are very interesting and instructive in the

Some examples of borders found upon Lowestoft porcelain. The  rose  appears upon most pieces painted with floral designs identification of blue and white Lowestoft, as they are known to have been used at this factory.Some examples of borders found upon Lowestoft porcelain. The rose  appears upon most pieces painted with floral designs identification of blue and white Lowestoft, as they are known to have been used at this factory.

Some examples of borders found upon Lowestoft porcelain. The "rose" appears upon most pieces painted with floral designs identification of blue and white Lowestoft, as they are known to have been used at this factory.

Some examples of borders found upon Lowestoft porcelain. The "rose" appears upon most pieces painted with floral designs identification of blue and white Lowestoft, as they are known to have been used at this factory.

Of Lowestoft porcelain decorated in colours the collector must be careful to discriminate between the so-called "Lowestoft," which is Chinese and hard paste (described on page 1421 of Part 12 of Every Woman's Encyclopaedia) and the real soft paste decorated in colours over glaze. This latter is very dainty and pretty.

The patterns most frequently found are those in which roses - sometimes in pink, or may be in puce - and small blue, red. and puce flowers are used in association with lines composed of dots in black or Indian red. The flowers either form festoons or are used as sprays and sprigs. One of the prettiest patterns is that in which a ribbon in carmine or puce is used as a waved border, with roses and sprays of flowers at intervals. A pink diaper border and diaper used as a circular or oval pendant or panel in a border may often be found.

We have heard a good deal about the Lowestoft rose, which is said to have been painted by a workman named Rose. It is a fact that this flower appears upon most pieces orna-m e n t e d with floral designs, but for this reason it would have been impossible for them to have been the work of any one man. As a matter of fact, the rose as painted at Lowestoft is not one to be proud of. There is nothing fine or natural about it, for the most part it is the mere suggestion of a rose with a spot o. colour in the centre and a good deal more round the edge. At times it was painted in purple, and may be found in the centre of a bouquet painted back to back with a similar monstrosity. In spite of its bad painting, however, this type of Lowestoft porcelain has many persuasive fascinations for the woman who collects.

The cornflower, or "Bourbon sprig," is frequently found upon mugs and tea-ware made at this factory, and a sprig in monochrome and gold was used upon fluted services. Portions of a cup so decorated were found during excavations.

A well-known pattern, and one of which there are several variations, is known as the Redgrave pattern, from the fact that a mug bearing this decoration was made by a man of this name, and has been treasured in his family ever since. The design is one in which cobalt blue is used under the glaze, and Indian red and gold over the glaze, the pattern being Chinese. It sometimes takes the form of landscape, figures, rocks, and rivers, at others the chrysanthemum is much in evidence, and in one variety cocks and hens cover the foreground, which is painted in a pale red. The gold is often much worn, .and it is used more or less to outline certain parts of the pattern.

Another kind of decoration is that known as "Mandarin." Here, again, is a design of Chinese origin, and one largely used at Worcester. It takes the form of Chinese figures in enamel colours-green, red, pink, and yellow. The foreground is generally suggested by lines of red, and frequently " Mandarin " Lowestoft china. This design was of Chinese origin, and took the form of Chinese figures in enamel colours, green, red, pink, and yellow. A bridge or palings often appears in the background a bridge or palings in red, with green foliage, is a feature of the background.

Figures were made at Lowestoft; these are more interesting than fine, and are generally classic or rustic in design. Vases - some of large size - were also manufactured. They were generally made in two pieces, and the join down either side is usually visible.

The Lowestoft works were closed in 1802, owing to the severe competition of the Staffordshire potteries. They had never recovered from a serious trade loss sustained in Holland, when Napoleon seized several thousand pounds' worth of porcelain exported to that country by this factory, a high-handed action that was on a par with his conduct as regards the art treasures of Italy and other countries whom he subjugated.

Mug, plate, and vase of Lowestoft porcelain, decorated in blue underglaze, from the collection of Messrs. A. B. Daniell &• Son

Mug, plate, and vase of Lowestoft porcelain, decorated in blue underglaze, from the collection of Messrs. A. B. Daniell &• Son

Reproduced by kind pit-mission of Messrs. Daniell