A prominent advocate of woman suffrage, as well as a brilliant writer and world-wide traveller, Lady Grove describes herself as "voteless and unrepresented." She is one of the children of that extraordinary genius,

General Pitt-rivers, of Rushmore, who gave the Pitt-rivers anthropological collection to Oxford University. Lady Grove, who was born in 1864, began to write when she was fifteen years of age, and since then has contributed to nearly every serious magazine in England. Her articles on social questions have attracted particular attention, a remark which also applies to her books, especially " Seventy-one Days' Camping in Morocco," and " The Social Fetish." It was after her marriage, in 1882, that she travelled extensively in America, Europe, and Africa. In Morocco she crossed the Atlas Mountains and made the acquaintance of the lately dethroned Sultan, Abd el Aziz. Sir Walter Grove is a popular Wiltshire squire, and both he and his wife take a keen delight in their home, Sedgehill Manor. They have four children-two sons and two daughters.

Lady Grove Elliott & Fry

Lady Grove Elliott & Fry