The Wealth of Flowers Available-yellow Laburnum and White Lilac-mauve Lilac Arranged for a Luncheon Table-the Dainty Effect of Aquilegias and Gypsophila-weigelia Blossoms in a

Pottery Jug-A Viola Table

Alyssum Aquilegias Aubrietia Arabis Doronicum Various iris Pyrethrum uliginosum

Ranunculus

Saxigraga

Sisyrinchium

Trollius

Myosotis

Gypsophila

Lilac

Laburnum

Wallflowers

Tulips

Narcissi

Hawthorn

Violas

Pansies

Weigelia Deutzia

American currant Carnations Lilies of the valley Numerous tree blossoms

For the May table an attractive yellow-and-white scheme could be arranged with laburnum and white lilac. Arrange a centre on your tablecloth of the golden blossoms, placing the stalks to the centre and the blossoms branching out in every direction. On this, in the middle, stand a very tall vase of slender form, and fill it with a few fine sprays of fragrant white lilac. Then, from this vase, arrange a shower of the golden blossoms to droop all round the vase. For the bonbons make baskets of plaited raffia of yellow and white, with tall handles stiffened with wire, so that they stand upright. Twine each handle with a spray of laburnum, and fill the baskets with yellow and white dainties.

A design for a luncheon party table, in lilac of two delicate shades of mauve, is the subject of one of the illustrations.

A very dainty effect can be produced by using columbines with gypsophila. To obtain this it must be borne in mind that every little spray must be put in the vase separately, as, if they are grouped in a bunch the effect is only that of a clumsy mass.

The weigelias again, with their dainty pink flowers, are most useful, as one can gather an armful of blossom from this prolific shrub without its being missed. Weigelias and iris used in the following way are sure to be admired. Mass the former in low bowls on the table, and arrange the iris to rise above, using for the purpose only delicate shades, and not the full purple variety.

Pansies and violas are beginning to yield

A table decoration for a luncheon party. Two shades of mauve lilac are arranged in white china vases. The mats on which the vases and finger bowls stand are of crepe paper to match the lilac

A table decoration for a luncheon party. Two shades of mauve lilac are arranged in white china vases. The mats on which the vases and finger-bowls stand are of crepe paper to match the lilac

An arrangement distinguished for delicacy of colour and lightness

An arrangement distinguished for delicacy of colour and lightness of grouping is the combination of gypsophila and columbines, or aquilegias, in pink, yellow and cream their fascinating flowers in May, and when it is remembered that the only way to ensure their blooming all the summer is to keep the blossoms gathered, it is not unduly extravagant to employ them as shown in the illustration.

For the table illustrated use violas of mauve and delicate yellow. First gather as many violas as will be needed, put them in water, and leave them for an hour or two before using them for decorating purposes. If this is done they will last fresh for hours out of water; the mistake usually made is to use the flowers just as gathered, and the result is disappointment.

For the centre take a pretty light basket wheelbarrow, painted in silver and trimmed with mauve and yellow ribbons. Its tin lining is filled with very wet moss, and in this sprays of violas, gathered with long stalks and some of their leaves, are arranged. A

Pink weigelia looks well in an old pottery jug, either alone or in combination with iris square lace table centre is placed on the table,

Pink weigelia looks well in an old pottery jug, either alone or in combination with iris square lace table-centre is placed on the table, the wheelbarrow stood upon this, while clusters of the flowers are arranged on the lace at the base of the barrow.

To make the arch design, strip a quantity of viola blossoms from their stalks, and, using the colours alternately, arrange them in arches as shown. Put a large plate in front of each guest's place as a guide in shaping the arches. Locate the centre of the arch at the top, and place three blossoms there, then start from the edge of the table on either side, placing one blossom each side until you reach the top three. There should be an equal number of blossoms each side.

Velvety pansies in every shade of purple, amethyst, and gold, could be employed in place of the violas.

The following are good firms for supplying materials, etc., mentioned in this section: Messrs. The Godiva Carriage Co. (Baby Cars); Thomas Keating' (Keating's Powder).

A charming table decoration in violas of blue, mauve, and yellow

A charming table decoration in violas of blue, mauve, and yellow. The centre-piece is a silver-painted wheelbarrow filled with moss and violas, standing upon a lace square. Each guest-place is indicated by an arch formed of the blossom heads arranged in alternate colours. If a tablecloth is used, pansies should take the place of violas