Soaking the wallpaper with disinfecting solution previous to stripping the walls

Soaking the wallpaper with disinfecting solution previous to stripping the walls

Toys, books, and magazines used in an infectious illness must be burnt

Toys, books, and magazines used in an infectious illness must be burnt

Bathing the patient before leaving the sick room

Bathing the patient before leaving the sick-room

Rinsing the mouth and throat with warm water and a little Condy's Fluid

Rinsing the mouth and throat with warm water and a little Condy's Fluid

Lighting sulphur candles for the disinfection of a room

Lighting sulphur candles for the disinfection of a room

It cannot be said too emphatically that disinfection must be thorough, so as to destroy all poisonous germs which may be in the room, as such poisons lie about latent for months under suitable conditions, and will give rise to the disease at some future period. If a room in which a diphtheria or scarlet fever case has been nursed were only partly disinfected, and then shut up for a long period, anyone occupying that room months afterwards would almost certainly contract the disease; but if the above directions are faithfully carried out, and thorough ventilation of the whole house made a special care, risk of later infection is inconsiderable.

Special Points of Note in Disinfection

1. For two or three days previous to the patient's leaving "quarantine" he ought to have an antiseptic bath every evening.

2. Special care should be taken to disinfect the nails, scalp, and hair with carbolic soap.

3. After having his last bath he should put on a clean dressing-gown, go into another room, and dress there in new clothes. The dressing-gown should afterwards be disinfected with the other things.

4. Because mattresses are liable to harbour the poison of infection for a long time, it is much wiser to have them burnt, or, atleast, the content-burnt, even if the outer covers are kept to be disinfected in carbolic solution and thoroughly cleaned before being restuffed.

5. Before knives, forks, dishes, etc., can be considered safe for general use, they must be steeped in a disinfecting solution, and then, it possible, boiled, or cleaned with boiling water. (See page 1821, Vol. 3, Every Woman's Encyclopaedia.)

6. After an infectious illness a patient should sleep in a room by himself for six weeks after he is out of quarantine, because in many illnesses, such as diphtheria, the poison may lurk about the throat for a long time after the patient is quite well.