A Good Design for a Stock-collar-a Design in Paisley Patterned Cretonne-collar Fastenings

There is something refreshing about novelties in the way of neckwear for mornings, but it is a point on which we have to be very practical.

In the country the question is easily settled by soft detachable white collars worn with knitted silk ties on various shirts. But this rather m asc u 1 i n e style is not very suitable for town wear, as it does not look really well out of doors with anything but what the Americans call a "shirt-waist hat." Nor is the lace jabot appropriate for the early hours of the day. The two designs given on this page just hit a happy medium between these two styles, and are both novel and useful.

A collar-band of dark silk should never be worn against the neck, even if surmounted by a dainty white stock-collar, as the wearing of dark materials next to the skin is apt to discolour it with the dye. Apart from this, on the grounds of cleanliness, even a coloured lace collar should always have a lining of white chiffon that can be constantly changed.

A stock-collar should be made up on a band of white muslin, and a silk or ribbon stock put over that. Another somewhat similar idea is here illustrated. Here there is an under collar of muslin with hemstitched tucks, and a shaped band of black moire or satin with a little bow in front over it. The muslin is rather expensive to buy, for a nice quality material is always needed for neckwear. Only a very small quantity will be required, however, as a piece of plain muslin can be joined on for the lower part. In cutting out the collar leave as wide a piece of muslin beyond the top tuck as the distance between the tucks will allow. Turn this down into a hem, which should be stitched into the row of hemstitching to form two tucks at the edge of the collar, one going up and the other going down. Cut the silk part of the

Stock collar in Paisley patterned cretonne, with band of ivory linen collar from a nicely fitting pattern to come half way up the neck. Turn in the edges all the way round and put in a lining of sarsenet.

Stock-collar in Paisley patterned cretonne, with band of ivory linen collar from a nicely fitting pattern to come half-way up the neck. Turn in the edges all the way round and put in a lining of sarsenet.

The other design is a very original idea, for it is carried out in Paisley patterned cretonne. The collar part is cut to shape, and is finished at the top with a 3/4-in. band of linen in ivory, or some pretty contrasting shade. The little rabat in front has the lower tab cut more tapering at the top than the upper one, which takes off from any stiffness of effect. These tabs are edged with narrow pipings of the linen. Such a collar looks extremely smart on a delaine or silk blouse of any plain shade to harmonise with the predominant tone of the cretonne. Other designs in cretonne could, of course, also be used, provided that not too large a one is chosen.

The advantage of this collar is that it does not crush, so keeps clean longer than most things, yet the whole collar can easily be washed. It is also very quickly put on, and needs no arranging, which is an important consideration in morning neckwear.

The most satisfactory method of fastening such collars is by means of small press fasteners; a small pin inserted at the back is then sufficient to secure it to the dress with which it is worn, a simple brooch or

A neat design in tucked muslin and black moire silk fancy lace pin performing the same office at the throat in front.

A neat design in tucked muslin and black moire silk fancy lace pin performing the same office at the throat in front.

The collar will be further improved if sufficiently high supports are used at the sides, although some people find it necessary to have a support at the back as well.