The Simple Making Up of Dressing Gowns and Jackets - A Winter Gown - How to Scallop the Edges of Collar and Sleeves - An Easily made Dressing-jacket - A Silk Handkerchief Collar - The

Advantages of a Breakfast-jacket - A Wrap for an Invalid

To the amateur, the making of a dressing-gown or dressing-jacket is a much easier affair than making a dress. There is no particular fit required, except on the shoulders, and the cut is not so important as that of a bodice or coat.

A pretty design, neat work, and careful finish are the chief things required ; given these, a successful garment may be achieved with very little trouble.

In these days of ready-made clothing, some people consider it waste of time to make a negligee ; but a home-made article has these advantages over a bought one - better material will be obtained, better work, and a more distinctive note in the design.

Most women have their own particular fancies in these matters, as well as in the more important items of their wardrobe. Then, too, so many of the negligees one buys are cut low in the neck, and this in cold weather, or when the negligee has to be worn by an invalid, is not an advantage.

How the handkerchief should be folded if a collar is to be made from it

How the handkerchief should be folded if a collar is to be made from it

A Winter Dressing-gown

The accompanying design could be carried out in any material, but is most suitable for a warm winter gown of flannel, cashmere, or any other soft-falling fabric.

A pretty scheme of colour would be a soft old rose cashmere, with frills of black silk or satin, finished off with black satin ribbons.

Or an electric blue might be chosen, trimmed with silk frills of electric blue, spotted with white. In this case, the ribbons should be blue.

Some women always prefer a light washing material for dressing-gowns, whatever the season is ; with such materials a bodice part of broderie anglaise would be pretty, with frills of lace.

With thicker materials, the collar, sleeves, and bodice part should be embroidered with silk, the same colour as the frills, and should be worked before they are made up.

For this purpose, transfer designs may be used, which can be ironed off on to the material. A simple floral spray should be chosen, not too elaborate, and the design worked in embroidery silk. The edge of the collar and sleeves can be scalloped if desired ; this can be marked out in the following way :

The dotted line on the diagram shows how a piece is to be cut from the folded handkerchief to form a neck opening

The dotted line on the diagram shows how a piece is to be cut from the folded handkerchief to form a neck opening

After the collar and sleeves are cut out, take a penny and place it on the material, so that the edge of the coin comes about a quarter of an inch inside the edge of the collar. Then, with a pencil, mark a semicircle, move the penny a little higher, and describe another semicircle ;this will give a double scallop, which can be repeated all round the edge. These scallops can then be worked in silk with buttonhole-stitch, the material being cut away close to the worked edge.

If the material frays too easily to scallop well, the edge can be hemstitched, or plainly hemmed and orna-mented with French knots.

The shape of the gown shown is somewhat novel, but should present no great difficulty to the home worker. It has a Magyar top, which could be cut from a pattern of a Magyar blouse, allowing double the length of the sleeve if this is desired to be long. The pattern should be cut off below the bust, and shaped as illustrated, taking all superfluous ful -ness into the seam under the arm.

The lower part, or skirt, is cut with a back and two front pieces.

The bodice part should be lined, as it fits and wears better so, and the lower part can be put on either gathered or in pleats. The bodice part should be placed over the lower part, and may have 'a piping of silk or be plainly stitched, and French knots worked along the stitching. The frills can be carried down the front if desired, or it can be left plain, in which case the loops and ends of ribbon fastening the collar should be fairly long.

A charming dressing gown in old rose cashmere, with frills of black silk or satin, finished with black satin ribbons. A simple floral design worked in embroidery silk would be effective on sleeves, bodice, and the dainty little cap

A charming dressing-gown in old rose cashmere, with frills of black silk or satin, finished with black satin ribbons. A simple floral design worked in embroidery silk would be effective on sleeves, bodice, and the dainty little cap

A Simple Dressing-jacket

The making of a dressing-jacket is a still more simple affair than the making of a dressing-gown.

As it is generally worn only for a short time while dressing the hair and finishing the toilette, it should be simple in construction and perfectly easy, allowing full play to the movement of the arms.

The kimono shape is exceedingly convenient, but it has become very common, and a change in design will doubtless be preferred.

A rather novel effect may be secured by using for a collar a large silk handkerchief, in a Paisley design, carried out in a variety of pretty colourings.

The handkerchief should be purchased first, then a material chosen for the jacket which will tone in with its predominant colouring.

The handkerchief collar could also be applied to a dressing-jacket which has lost its first freshness, and requires renovation.