How to Make Fancy Articles with which to Decorate the Home-materials-designs-paintsmethod and Trimmings

Nothing lends a more artistic effect to a house than pretty fancy-work articles, and those whose time is somewhat limited will, no doubt, welcome the introduction of French painting, a new and fascinating style of work.

It is done with a pen in oils, and gives a ribbon-work appearance.

The painting may be done on different kinds of materials, according to the article designed. Velveteen, which costs about three shillings per yard, is the best material to use for cushions, table-centres, d'oyleys, and tea-cosies; and, provided the paint is laid on very lightly, some very becoming scarves may also be fashioned. Fabrics of a more delicate nature, however, may be employed, such as chiffon and satin, at one shilling and elevenpence per yard; but these are only recommended for articles that will not have a great amount of wear and tear, as, for instance, d'oyleys and table-centres.

Before beginning the process of painting, it is advisable to line the article, sateen being the most suitable for velveteen; though, of course, silk would make a handsome finish.

Chiffon and satin should always be lined with a soft silk or muslin, either in the same shade, or a contrasting colour. A table-centre carried out in bright green chiffon, lined with mauve, and worked with mauve flowers and green leaves, gives a most effective result. White chiffon lined with pink or blue, and worked in the same colours, would also be extremely attractiveonce the article required and the materials are decided upon, particular attention should be given to the choice of designs.

Designs

Small baskets of flowers, connected by narrow ribbons and dainty wreaths, are the best; but all designs of a large nature should be avoided, as it is necessary that each petal or flower should be completed by one stroke of the pen. Violets, forget-me-nots, heather, mimosa, and small daisies, are very simple

A white velvet d'oyley, with a design of natural flowers in French painting

A white velvet d'oyley, with a design of natural flowers in French painting