Students requiring still further technical information about block making and reproduction are sent over to the engraver, who works in connection with the school just opposite.

The successful press illustrator must be prepared to adapt her methods of drawing to the requirements of the publication for which it is being executed, and students working from the model in the studio make sets of studies suitable for reproduction by the various different methods employed in modern illustration work. Drawings for rapid printing - as in newspaper work - must be executed in the fewest possible lines; while for magazine illustrations the finest pen-and-ink or black-and-white wash is required.

Students drawing in pen-and-ink from the figure learn to observe the outline, a point in which figure drawing for illustration differs from ordinary charcoal studies from the figure, where a hard outline is always avoided.

The special classes for black-and-white reproduction are strictly limited, so that each student gets individual attention. Often each student in the class is working on a different subject and in a different medium - one will be illustrating a fairy-tale in finest pen-and-ink; another, perhaps, planning out a design for a book-plate; a third will be translating a photograph of some well-known violinist into a line drawing suitable for newspaper reproduction without losing the likeness - a difficult piece of work - and a fourth will be engaged on a poster depicting the joys of the seaside. Mr. Norbury goes constantly round the class, criticising and advising, and makes a point of seeing each pupil's work at least once an hour.

Occasionally students want to be taught to take photographs for news. This can be done partly indoors and partly outside; and when students know nothing about photography they are introduced to the special photographic artist attached to the school.

The studio is open from February to July and from October to December, inclusive, every day except Saturday, from 10 to 1, from 2 to 5, and from 7 to 9.30. Each day lesson lasts for three hours, and each evening lesson lasts for two hours and a half.

A course of lessons may be begun on any date, and the fees are as follows :

Term of twelve weeks

Year of nine months

s.

d.

s.

d.

1 lesson weekly ..

3

3

0

8

8

0

2 lessons ,, ..

5

5

0

13

13

0

3 ,, ,, ..

8

8

0

18

18

0

6 ,, ,, ..

10

10

0

21

0

0

Private lessons, lasting for one hour, for which the fee is five guineas for twelve lessons, are also given at the studio by arrangement.

An elementary course for those who have had no previous training is also provided, the fees being two guineas for twelve lessons, each of an hour's duration.

During the summer months, whenever the weather permits, Mr. Norbury and his students vary the monotony of studio work by putting in one morning at least each week sketching in one of the enclosed parts of Hyde Park.

During August and September there are generally a few who like to join a special sketching class for landscape and figure work in some picturesque neighbourhood. Last year it met at Sampwood, near Wendover, on the Chiltern Hills; the year before, at Dinan, in Brittany. The fees for the sketching class are :

For one month

For two months

2 lessons weekly ...

3

s.

3

d. 0

5

S.

5

d. 0

4 " " ...

5

5

0

8

8

0

The studio class hours for various subjects are as follows:

A class of students at the Press Studio drawing from the costume model

A class of students at the Press Studio drawing from the costume model. The students make sets of studies suitable for reproduction by the different methods employed in illustration work for newspapers and magazines of all kinds

Life Figure : Ladies - Mondays, 2 to 5; gentlemen - Tuesdays and Thursdays, 7 to 9.30 p.m.

Costume Model: Thursdays, 2 to 5.

Time and Memory Sketching, Composition, Anatomy : Mondays, 10 to 1; Tuesdays, 2 to 5.

Drawing, etc., Black-and-white for Press Reproduction : Mondays, 7 to 9.30; Tuesdays and Thursdays, 10 to 1.

Besides the classes held at the Chelsea studio, Mr. Norbury gives special instruction in illustrating for the Press to a large number of correspondence students, who are not only scattered over the British Isles, but are living in all parts of the globe.