In Madame Paderewski the famous pianist has a congenial spirit in many respects. A woman of great culture and charm, she takes a lively interest in everything that appeals to her famous husband, a remark which applies particularly to his love of farming. At his Swiss home on the shore of Lake Leman, Paderewski has built up an extensive farm. Here he interests himself in his sheep and pigs, while Madame Paderewski goes in for poultry breeding. She has over a thousand chickens and fowls of all kinds, and has succeeded in creating some new species by cross-breeding. Her poultry are of great value, and not long ago she sold to an American purchaser a couple of White Orpingtons for 1,500. Madame Paderewski, who is Baroness de Rosen in her own right, was married to the pianist in 1899, and is very musical herself. She has followed her husband's career since he was twenty, when she first met him in Warsaw. She is, however, more fond of the harp than the piano. Her wide philanthropy has gained for her much popularity. One of her acts was to take five poor Polish children living at Warsaw, and pay for and superintend their education. She herself comes of an old Polish family, and is Paderewski's second wife. In connection with Madame Pade-rewski's interest in farming, her successful efforts have been recognised by the French Ministry, who have conferred upon her the distinction of Chevaliere du Merite Agricole, an honour of which she is very proud.

Madame Paderewski E. N. A.

Madame Paderewski E. N. A.