The daughter of the well-known landscape painter, the late Alfred William Hunt. Miss Hunt began to write when she was twelve years of age, and with such success that she earned several payments of three guineas for lyrics published in the " Century Magazine" ere she reached her 'teens. She was brought up in a literary atmosphere, however; among her mother's personal friends were Ruskin, Rossetti, Blackmore, Browning, and William Morris. Mr. Theodore Watts Dunton also tried to foster her talent as a poet. Inheriting a taste for art from her father, she worked in art schools for eight years. "But I never had any intention of becoming a painter," says Miss Hunt, although a portrait of Mrs. Andrew Lang which she painted brought her in ten guineas. Then she tried journalism, and eventually wrote "The Maiden's Progress," a novel indialogue.which was the forerunner of such books as "A Hard Woman," "The Human Interest," "Sooner or Later," and "The Cat" (animal autobiographies). The latter book, in which Miss Hunt assumes the character of a little Blue Persian, is considered, not only by Miss Hunt herself, but also by Mr. H. G. Wells, to be the best thing she has ever done. Needless to say, Miss Hunt is a great cat lover, and in her study at her delightful home at Campden Lodge four or five feline favourites are usually to be seen even when she is working.

Miss Violet Hunt Russell

Miss Violet Hunt Russell