Holiday Pinafore and Overalls - When Children are Paddling - The Crawling Child - Pinafores for Boys

When a child is told not to soil her frock a holiday is robbed of half its pleasure. Either she has a dull time trying to keep clean while longing to scramble about or engage in rather grubby but very pleasant pastimes, or she gives herself up for lost, decides to disregard orders and have a pleasant time, but with the consciousness that a scolding is sure to come.

We are suggesting pinafores and overalls of a thoroughly practical nature not only for the children's benefit, but also for the mother's. The knowledge that the boys and girls can have a good romp without hurting their clothes is a real boon to a busy mother with none too much time on her hands for extra mending and brushing.

Many pinafores of otherwise excellent design have no sleeves. The ideal overall has long, loose sleeves caught down into a wristband, so that there is plenty of room for free use of the arms in tree-climbing, swinging, or hoop bowling, and yet no fulness is left to flop about.

Good ingrain cotton, of not too light a shade, is the best material for overalls, unless ornamental ones are planned, in which case green, blue, or brown linens are excellent provided they are not heavy; and embroidery or smocking may be used as ornamental detail.

for a simply made crawler join 2 1/4 yards of zephyr into a long narrow bag. Run a tape into each end to draw up round the child's waist

The overall for the self respecting boy who will have no girlish pinafore put upon him, and who engages in all kinds of fretwork, carpentry, bicycle cleaning, glueing jobs, and other knicker destroying pranks, is a more serious matter

The overall for the self-respecting boy who will have no girlish pinafore put upon him, and who engages in all kinds of fretwork, carpentry, bicycle cleaning, glueing jobs, and other knicker-destroying pranks, is a more serious matter. The very best solution of the question is to make the lad such an overall as capable men, like working motorists or other engineers, always wear. The boy will probably be proud to don such a garment, and the boy's clothes, which are a heavy item in family expenditure, will be kept free from dirt.

Cut the overall with a bib continuation of a good loose trouser pattern, and use good stout blue linen. Sew bands of the same to pass over the shoulders, and the overall will be quite easy to slip into.

At The Seaside

Many a mother sighs when she thinks of the sand-pie and paddling mornings, which are at the same time so delightful and so destructive to nice clothes, to say nothing of risks run by children who will go into the sea too far, so that they get their petticoats wet.

It is quite easy to make a garment in which a child will be immune from all danger of damp, and yet be unhampered in movement, nor will she be the unsightly object which the pushing up of clothes renders inevitable. Get a good loose knicker pattern, and cut it out of mackintosh cloth of a light weight, which can be purchased by the yard at any indiarubber shop. Either glue down the hems with mackintosh solution specially sold, or stick so that tape or elastic can be run in to draw up the knees. Add a large bib of the mackintosh right up to the neck, so that seaweed and other damp objects can be examined close to the chest without making a child damp in this most vulnerable spot. The old saying that sea water never gives cold is a fallacy, though, happily, colds are not caught so readily by children when they are spending most of their time in the open air.

An overall cut on the lines of an engineer's working suit will be worn by a boy when a girlish pinafore would be scorned

An overall cut on the lines of an engineer's working suit will be worn by a boy when a girlish pinafore would be scorned

If mackintosh knickers with apron front are worn at the seaside, a child may play on the sands and paddle without risk of chill from damp clothes

If mackintosh knickers with apron front are worn at the seaside, a child may play on the sands and paddle without risk of chill from damp clothes

The Crawling Child

Many a painstaking mother desires to allow her baby health - giving freedom to crawl on the floor, but thinks twice about it because of the disastrous effect on dainty petticoats, for however clean a nursery floor may be, a child cannot crawl for long without getting its white frock and starched petticoats crumpled and soiled. The actual wear is also a serious matter.

Here is a simply made crawler which protects the underskirts and frock in a practical manner. Get 2 1/4 yards of cotton zephyr or print, cut it in two, join it up the sides, run a slot and tape into each end, so that you have a long, narrow bag with no bottom to it. Tie one tape round the child's waist under all the petticoats, bring up the overall, and tie the other tape round the child's waist on the outside of its dress, and the under and upper skirts will be thoroughly protected. With this garment baby can crawl anywhere, and when the simple contrivance is taken off he will have on his fresh clean garments as nice and as un-crushed as when they were first put on. It has also the additional merit of being one of the simplest of garments to launder, and can be washed expeditiously and easily.

The crawler in use. Made as described on this page, it completely protects the child's clothes when playing on the floor