A Decorative Embellishment in Eastern Style for Clothes - How One Sheet of Designs May be Utilised in Various Ways - As a Trimming for a Tailor-made Coat - Children's Frocks and Lingerie

A strip of Eastern embroidery shows the skill and patience of the Oriental, and is proving its charm as an embellishment for smart chiffons, for from it one can take many ideas.

The ladies of the Court of a native prince wile away many hours over their frame of brilliant embroidery. It is as gay as a butterfly's wing, scintillating with gold and silver thread, beads and jewels.

The Englishwoman who is fortunate enough to gain an audience with a native princess is surprised at two things. First, as a rule, at the excellent English she speaks ; and, secondly, at the curious complexity of a nature which, in spite of modern education, is still absolutely Oriental. The wit, charm, and culture of the secluded woman is irresistible ; but it is said "the purdah," the curtain which is placed between the native and the European, grows thinner each year.

The Eastern woman decorates her 'sari" according to her rank with gold thread and gorgeous silks, and as she places a sweet-scented garland around the shoulders of the European visitor, one instinctively admires the attractiveness of the supple figure draped by the graceful "sari."

Although we follow the dictates of

European fashion, we may decorate our clothes with touches of Oriental embroidery which will prove marvellously effective trimmings at little cost - if manipulated at home.

trimming for an evening gown

Fig. 1. The whole design of Durbar embroidery would be most effective on a blouse or the end of a sash. This design would make an exquisite

Fig. 1. The whole design of Durbar embroidery would be most effective on a blouse or the end of a sash. This design would make an exquisite

Fig. 2. The flower of the Durbar embroidery design arranged in V shape to form an attractive trimming for an evening gown, or a beautiful Vandyke edge to a collar or fichu

Fig. 2. The flower of the Durbar embroidery design arranged in V shape to form an attractive trimming for an evening gown, or a beautiful Vandyke edge to a collar or fichu

On the next page is a quaint design in outline. This is eminently suitable for embroidering clothes in soft coloured silks with touches of gold and silver thread.

The Durbar embroidery design may be used in numerous ways. It can, if preferred, be made a still more durable embroidery sheet by duplicating it on to a piece of tracing cloth. Place the tracing cloth over the page, and, with a pencil, or pen dipped in Indian ink, follow the lines of the design.

The following is a simple and satisfactory method of tracing the design on to the fabric : Place a sheet of red carbon paper on the material, cover it with the traced design, and outline the portion required with the blunt point of a lead pencil, or a slender-pointed bone crochet hook. Anything firm and hard which will not scratch through the design is excellent.

It will be seen on this page there is one conventional Oriental design. From this all kinds of smaller decorative designs can be made; the circles and moons make a design, the flowers and leaves another, and so on. The em-broideress has only got to select either the whole or any portion of the pattern to use in any way she desires.

How To Utilise The Design

Around the central design several of these smaller patterns are given. These again may be arranged in various ways by the embroi-deress. She has simply to place the design sheet at the angle she requires, and she can trace these patterns in innumerable ways on many articles.

Fig. 3. The duplication of this pattern makes a charming dress trimming. In white, it can be used to adorn lingerie

Fig. 3. The duplication of this pattern makes a charming dress trimming. In white, it can be used to adorn lingerie

Fig. 4. A portion of the Durbar embroidery, worked in strips, to be used on a cloth or velvet costume

Fig. 4. A portion of the Durbar embroidery, worked in strips, to be used on a cloth or velvet costume

A sheet of designs for Durbar embroidery; each pattern can be used separately and duplicated by placing upon it a piece of tracing cloth and following the lines of the pattern with a pencil, or a pen dipped in Indian ink

A sheet of designs for Durbar embroidery; each pattern can be used separately and duplicated by placing upon it a piece of tracing cloth and following the lines of the pattern with a pencil, or a pen dipped in Indian ink

Fig. 5. A portion of the Durbar embroidery design suitable for the lapel of a coat, to be worked in gold thread

Fig. 5. A portion of the Durbar embroidery design suitable for the lapel of a coat, to be worked in gold thread

If the central design of the "Durbar Embroidery Sheet" is traced on to muslin, silk, satin, or velvet, it will make a charming embellishment for a blouse (Fig. 1). The flower may be embroidered in fine gold thread, using satin stitch. The half-moons are worked alternately in gold thread and rose silk, using the open chain stitch. The circles are filled in closely in rose silk, using satin stitch. The stems and leaves may be simply outlined in dull green silk, and veined with gold, or the leaves may be entirely filled in with satin stitch.

Another method of using a coarse gold thread is to embroider the design in soft Oriental colours - blue, rose, primrose, dull gold, or any delicate shade which suits the material that is to be beautified. Simply outline the entire design - afterwards in gold thread. If it is too coarse to be drawn through the material, it is stitched around the design with fine silk.

This is called " couching," an ancient embroidery method.

Fig. 2 shows the flower of the Durbar design arranged in a festoon or V. This arrangement is easily manipulated. Simply trace the flower only in any design or shape to suit any gown or style. It would make an attractive adornment for an evening gown of Oriental satin worked in soft blue, dull green, and primrose, and outlined in gold, or it could be worked entirely in gold or silver. The centres of the flowers may be enriched by a scintillating sequin or a pearl bead. This motif would also form a beautiful Vandyke edge to a collar or fichu. It would also make a smart trimming for a white cloth gown.

Motifs as a Border

No. 3 shows another portion of the design duplicated to decorate an entire gown, a crossover blouse, cuffs, or a flounce. It would also look well worked in rose, dull green, primrose, and dull blue and silver on the cuffs and collar of a Navy blue tailor-made coat and skirt. The entire design is worked in satin stitch, the half-moons in silver thread. A pretty finish for a collar and cuffs would be a border in buttonhole stitch in silk or silver thread.

Fig. 4 shows still another portion of the design, the half-moons embroidered as a border parallel one with the other. The moons may also be embroidered in a slanting position one above the other. They are effective embroidered on pale blue cloth or serge, in silver thread outlined alternately in rose and dull green; the circles filled in with rose silk and gold. An effective border may be made by using open chain stitch in dull green. Strips of cloth, velvet, or satin which have been previously cut out by the tailor would look well round the fashionable sailor collar of a coat or round the bottom of the coat, the cuffs and sides of the skirt worked in Oriental colourings or black filoselle. This idea makes a charming embellishment for Navy blue clothes.

Fig. 6. This design in appropriate colouring would form a beautiful embellishment for a tunic of white cloth, if worked solidly in satin stitch

Fig. 6. This design in appropriate colouring would form a beautiful embellishment for a tunic of white cloth, if worked solidly in satin stitch

Blouse on the front of which the full design of Durbar embroidery is shown

Blouse on the front of which the full design of Durbar embroidery is shown

Fig. 5 shows the leaves and moons of the design worked entirely in gold thread. One portion of the leaf is worked in open chain stitch, which gives a charming, lacelike appearance. This gold embroidery is most costly to buy, but it need not be so when worked at home. Embroidered on white cloth, it makes a beautiful lapel for the coat of white cloth tailor-made clothes. Cuffs may be embroidered en suite. Embroidered on strips of white Oriental satin, this design, worked in gold thread, would make exquisite trimming for an evening gown. Gold lace embroidery would also look well on an evening cloak. Anything which suggests the Oriental is particularly effective at night. The soft glow of candles or shaded lights catches the gleaming threads of gold, and intensifies their beauty.

Fig. 6 shows yet another idea worked out from the central design. This is effective on the sleeves and collar of a coat, a crossover blouse, or on strips of material as the sole trimming of a dress. It is worked solidly in satin stitch in soft shades of blue and green. The lower leaf is veined with French knots in gold. A pretty edging is made to this design by using buttonhole stitch for festoons at the bottom of the design, worked in soft shades of blue.

All the designs given could enhance the charms of many articles of feminine attire. Any would look well on velvet, and yet would be equally effective on muslin. The field for the use of the Durbar design is truly a wide one, and must particularly appeal to all who appreciate the beauty of dainty clothes.

If worked in white flourishing thread, the small designs would make a delightful embellishment for dainty lingerie.

The sheet of designs is a little treasure trove which the embroideress may draw upon again and again to use in countless useful and artistic ways.

A suggestion for a border trimming formed from the Durbar design

A suggestion for a border trimming formed from the Durbar design