Importance of Taking Care of Clothes - How to Fold and Hang Skirts and Bodices - Hats and How to Treat Them - Tissue Paper a Cleanser - How to Wash Lingerie Ribbons - The Care of a Veil

Economy in dress is accomplished in two ways; the first is by buying clothes judiciously, and the other, by no means the less important, is by caring for them after they are bought.

The woman who has solved this latter problem not only enhances the appearance of her wardrobe, but actually prolongs its life, and is able to look better dressed than her neighbour, who may spend twice as much on her dress.

Fig. 1. Lay the skirt on a flat surface with a fold down centre front. Fold the back portion inward at dotted line, making another length wise fold at second dotted line

Fig. 1. Lay the skirt on a flat surface with a fold down centre-front. Fold the back portion inward at dotted line, making another length-wise fold at second dotted line

Take, for example, the matter of skirts. When bouffante effects are in fashion, it is necessary to hang the skirts, and for this purpose skirt hangers, holding the skirts in their proper position about the hips, are of great use; but to hang the skirt on a single nail is fatal. It is fortunate when straight lines and untrimmed skirts are in fashion, for clothes always keep better when folded than when hung, but there is a real art in folding skirts. A skirt to be folded should be laid on a bed or some fiat surface, with a fold down the centre of the front. The gores then face each other, and the next move is to fold inward the train portion so that the skirt forms a triangle, with the two long sides of equal length. Sheets of tissue paper should be laid over the entire surface of the skirt, and a n o t her lengt h w i s e fold made.

Fig. 2. The skirt as it should appear when folded in length' wise folds

Fig. 2. The skirt as it should appear when folded in length' wise folds

Fig. 3. Turn the belt down to reach about a third of the skirt length. Fold up the hem to reach the folded top portion. Tissue paper should be placed between all folds, especially if there are buttons or raised trimmings

Fig. 3. Turn the belt down to reach about a third of the skirt length. Fold up the hem to reach the folded top portion. Tissue paper should be placed between all folds, especially if there are buttons or raised trimmings

This applies to the skirt of normal width.. With an extremely wide or narrow skirt judgment must be used as to how much lengthwise

Folding is done before the crosswise sections are made.

For this latter process, turn the belt down to reach about a, third of the length of the skirt, and fold up from the hem the remainder so that the hem portion lies against the top which has been turned down. It is always well to nave sheets of tissue paper between each fold. Wherever there are buttons this is essential, lest the buttons impress the material. If skirts are folded in this way, several can be laid one on top of the other without injury when finally put into drawers or a large box.

There is but one way to fold a bodice. The bodice is held wrong side out (not the sleeves) and folded down the centre, holding the sleeves together at the shoulder seam and opposite to the centre fold. The sides are then laid smoothly against the centre, and this will bring the sides on the right side out. One sleeve is now laid flatly over one side and the other sleeve over the other side, and the bodice then folded once through the centre crosswise, if there is not room to lay it away in its full-length folding.

Fig. 5. Fold down centre front, lay the sides smoothly to the centre, thus bringing the sleeves right side out

Fig. 5. Fold down centre-front, lay the sides smoothly to the centre, thus bringing the sleeves right side out

Fig. 4. The only correct way to fold a bodice. Take the bodice at the shoulders, holding the sleeves together at the shoulder seams

Fig. 4. The only correct way to fold a bodice. Take the bodice at the shoulders, holding the sleeves together at the shoulder seams

Where there is plenty of room in a cupboard, it is an excellent plan to run a pole from the back to the centre of the front, and use this to suspend hangers, instead of the old-fashioned method of crushing them against the wall.

For fixing the pole a brass socket is procured and screwed on to the back wall of the cupboard. The pole is secured in like manner to the top piece over the door of the cupboard.

A still simpler way is to nail two small pieces of wood on to the wall of the cupboard, and let these support the two ends of the pole. To prevent the pole from rolling, small blocks should be nailed on the supports at each side of the pole.

All clothes must be brushed after each wearing. It is not sufficient to brush them before use, as the dust accumulated from one wearing and allowed to remain while the fabric is "resting" does great damage.

The Care Of Millinery

Each hat should be kept in a separate box and, if trimmed with feathers, in a warm room. The ideal method is to have a "hat cupboard" through which pass hot-water pipes, but this, unfortunately, is not within the reach of all.

Feathers are affected by the atmosphere of even a comparatively dry day, and therefore, as soon as the hat is taken from the head, the feathers should be held near a fire and shaken till each frond is quite dry and curly. If the dampness has actually taken out the curl, restore it by drawing each frond over the edge of a spoon or ivory paper-knife, but never over a sharp edge. It is true that the sharp-edged knife curls the feathers tightly and quickly, but it injures the fine edge of the frond. Holding the feather and shaking it over the steam pouring from a boiling kettle is beneficial.