Wedgwood jasper ware, A circular pedestal, with a chequered pattern in olive and lilac, and a cortee pot with white figures and ornaments in relief on a lilac ground from the South Kensington Museum

Wedgwood jasper ware, A circular pedestal, with a chequered pattern in olive and lilac, and a cortee-pot with white figures and ornaments in relief on a lilac ground from the South Kensington Museum

Marks found upon Wedgwood pottery and china. The word

Marks found upon Wedgwood pottery and china. The word

"Bentley" signifies the partnership of Wedgwood and Bentley, and latterly the word "Etruria" was added. In the oldest marks the letter " O" is very round; in latter times it is narrower

Fifty original copies were made. They were all subscribed for at 50 apiece. Eater on other copies were manufactured, but they do not bear comparison with the first.

The beautiful Barbarini vase is now in the British Museum, where it was, unfortunately, smashed to atoms in 1845 by a fanatic. It has been well restored, but it is grievous to contemplate the wreck of a beautiful work of art of such great antiquity.

In 1790 Wedgwood took his sons, John, Josiah, and Thomas, and his nephew, Thomas Byerley, into partnership. He died in 1795.

The principal mark is the name Wedgwood impressed in the paste. This was generally in capitals, varying in size from a quarter to one thirty-second of an inch in height. Sometimes the initial letter only was a capital. During the partnership with Bentley his name appears with Wedgwood, and during the latter days, before the death of Bentley, in 1780, the word Etruria is added. In the oldest mark the letter "O" is very round. In later times it is narrower. The marks "Wedgewood" and " Wedgwood & Co." do not belong to these works, but to another firm.

By Lilian Joy

By Lilian Joy

Decorated Satin wood - A Useful Room - Walnut Chairs - Chippendale Models - Upholstered Arm-chairs-coverings-an Economical Notion

The drawing - room suite, consisting of a sofa, two upholstered and so-called "comfortable" chairs, and a set of four or six admittedly uncomfortable small chairs is a thing of the past.

In its place there are, as essentials, the Chesterfield, two or three thoroughly well made easy-chairs, and after that the seating capacity of the room may be supplied as the fancy of the individual dictates.

So much has period furnishing, however, done for the taste of the day that the nondescript chair, showing lack of taste and originality in the design, is not permitted. It is the desire of every woman who is really interested in her house to have each individual piece of furniture, even so small a thing as an occasional chair in the drawing-room, a thing of beauty in itself.

There is a strong feeling in this connection for decorated satinwood. An objection is sometimes raised that it is cold in effect. This, however, depends on the colour scheme of the surrounding decorations. One has seen satinwood furniture look lovely in a room carried out entirely in golden shades. The walls were a yellowish buff with a frieze above. The carpet was a soft yellow. Even the windows were shaded with pale golden gauze in the form of blinds. The whole effect was that gained when standing under an autumn-tinted tree on a sunny day. Of course such an experiment must be made with the utmost care, and the tones must be blended with the eye of an artist, or the result might very easily be disastrous.

An apartment of this type, or one furnished in the French style, however, is distinctly what might be termed a "drawing-roomy" room, and there is a strong feeling among many people of preference for something more comfortable and with an appearance of being lived in. This is a practical age, and we are loth to give up an entire room for the reception of guests. Moreover, we do not seem to have the time our grand-mothers had to expend on "best" things in either furniture, china, or clothes. We like to get the greatest possible use out of what we have. Hence it is that a very useful " sitting-room" is in many houses taking the place of the drawing-room sacred to the use of guests alone. It is a room especially beloved of men, for in it there are no chairs in which they are afraid to trust their weight, or that they are begged not to tilt for fear a leg should give way.

An occasional chair in the Adams style. Such a chair should be used in a room decorated in the Adams period

An occasional chair in the Adams style. Such a chair should be used in a room decorated in the Adams period

Photos, Messrs. Druce & Co.

Such a room may be decorated in quite light shades, but the furniture is of a more substantial character. And there is no need for us to go to other countries for our inspiration in matters of furniture design with such names as Chippendale, Heppelwhite, Sheraton, and Adams on the list of our own celebrated makers.

The Popularity Of Chippendale

Chippendale is enjoying a special share of popularity now (1911), but there are also the delightful William and Mary and Queen Anne models of a period just previous to his time. They are largely influenced by the Dutch furniture brought over by the former Sovereigns, and marked a great change from the oak of the Stuart times, which had hitherto been used entirely. Queen Anne chairs look very well in a drawing-room and always seem to lend a good deal of character. The walnutwood of which they are contrived harmonises very happily with a grey wall-paper as a background, though grey is generally considered typical of the Adams style of decoration. It is also very fine with the beautiful, if somewhat unserviceable, mauve that is being used a good deal, or with rose colour.