In stained-glass work the practical side is insisted upon. The students cut their own glass, and lead and solder it themselves.

All branches of artistic metal-work are taught - shaping, relief, jewelling, enamelling, etc., while there are classes for wood-carving, leather work, and bookbinding and embroidery.

The class for drawing for reproduction takes a practical course, the work being reproduced in block form and printed on a press in the department.

All students are advised to work at one craft at least, and more if possible. The notion that an art student is a reckless creature, unable to handle any implement other than a pencil or brush, is sternly discouraged.

Painting is considered as a craft in itself, and instead of allowing the student to wander on aimlessly, every step in the process is taught. Choice of canvas, colours, and all the stages of painting receive attention, so that the student may become a thorough craftsman.

Behind all these art processes is the composition class, where the importance of original work is impressed upon students who intend to work professionally. Memory work is insisted upon, and the teaching goes far beyond the perfunctory criticism of a perfunctory sketch. Arrangements are made for the pinning up of lengths of paper or canvas, so that students can work out their ideas full size.

Another branch of the department's work is that of training art teachers in secondary schools. Students wishing to become teachers, in addition to their own art training attend special lectures on pedagogy and also the large elementary classes of the department, where they watch lessons given, note methods, and themselves teach under the supervision of the Director. A teaching diploma in Fine Art is issued by the College.

Students attending a lecture on surveying. They are constantly taught the doctrine of hard work, and are prepared early for future arduous conditions to which their professions will subject them

Students attending a lecture on surveying. They are constantly taught the doctrine of hard work, and are prepared early for future arduous conditions to which their professions will subject them

The conservatories and greenhouses of the department of horticulture, which are also situated in the college grounds, are placed at the disposal of students of design. They thus have the privilege of studying plant form and of making botanical drawings direct from Nature.

The study of animal painting and modelling from the life is another branch of .the training. A collection of small animals and a number of birds are kept specially on the premises to act as models'. They are placed in pens on the grass in the centre of the class on sunny days, and, in bad weather or in winter time, in cages in one of the studios. . .

Special arrangements have also been made to provide suitable horse models to pose on one or two days a week in a specially fitted studio or out in the open courtyard, the class working under the Director, who has long made animal painting a special matter of study.

The Director of the Fine Arts Department is Mr. Allen W. Sealy, Associate of the University College, Reading, and member of the International Society of Sculptors, Painters, and Gravers, and of the Society of Gravers in Colour. Mr. Walter Crane, R.w.s., is the visiting examiner, and the teachers are Mr. J. E. Drew, Mr. C. Pearce, and Mr. H. B. Whiteside, an Associate of the Royal College of Art.

Mr. Herbert Maryon, the teacher of handicrafts, is assisted by Miss Clara M. Wilson, and the assistant teacher for manual instruction is Mr. H. Davis.

The lecturer in architecture is Mr. H. Hutt, Associate of University College, Reading, A.r.i.b.a.

The general organisation and the life led by its students reflect the university spirit, and the number of day students following degree and diploma courses of study, occupying two, three, or four years, is steadily increasing.

All students under a certain age, taking a regular course of day study are required to live in a hall of residence or hostel, unless they are living with their parents or guardians, or hold a written permission from the Principal to live elsewhere. This permission is granted only for special reasons. Students are not allowed to live in ordinary lodgings.

St. Andrew's Hall, whose warden is Miss M. Bolam, M.a., and St. George's Hostel, whose warden is Miss J. Ormerod, an Associate of University College, Reading, contain comfortable accommodation for about no women students. Each student has a cubicle, a single bedroom, or a study bedroom.

The hostels also provide studies, common rooms, dining-rooms, and bath-rooms, and the dietary is under medical inspection. Each hostel has a good garden, and accommodation for bicycles is provided.

The cost of board and lodging at the hostels for the session of thirty weeks is 32 for a student occupying a cubicle, and from 36 to 42 for a student occupying a separate room.

Additional maintenance fees, in the same proportion, are payable by students remaining at the hostel for any part of the college vacation - by the students of Fine Art, for instance, who have an additional six weeks added to the ordinary college session, in order to bring that department of the college within the Board of Education's regulations.

Besides the two hostels, there are certain recognised houses of residence for women students. The charges are very much the same as those already mentioned.

The fees for board and lodging in the hostels and houses of residence are payable in advance by the term.

There are two open entrance scholarships offered for the Fine Arts Department to the value of E30 per annum. They are awarded annually, and are open for competition in July of each year to men and girls who are over the age of sixteen in the September following. There is a possibility of obtaining a renewal of these scholarships for a second session should the holder's progress during the first year prove satisfactory. Each scholarship entitles the holder to full instruction in the Department of the Fine Arts, and to a maintenance grant of 16 per annum.

Scholars are also permitted to attend a limited number of college classes in such subjects as English, French; German, and history, should they wish to do so, without fee.

Candidates for scholarships will be required to submit specimens of their work to the director, and to be interviewed by him.

The prospectus of the Fine Arts Department may be obtained from the tutorial secretary, University College, Reading, to whom intending candidates should apply for an entry form. This must be filled in and returned early in July.

A diploma in Fine Arts is awarded by the college to students who can display a general knowledge of fine art besides producing satisfactory practical work at the end of a three years' course. Certificates are granted for metal - work, wood-carving, embroidery, and leather-work.

The following prizes are also offered :

The Mackinder Essay Prize, to the value of about five guineas, i s open to all matriculated students, and is awarded to the student who writes the best English essay in an examination held annually at Christmas.

The Wells Prize, consisting of books to the value of 2 5s., is awarded to the student who, having been in regular attendance during two evening sessions, deserves, in the opinion of the college authorities, most credit for work in art.

The College Prize for Students in Fine Art. A prize of books is awarded to the student of not fewer than three terms' standing at the end of the session who gains the highest aggregate of marks in the art examinations of the Board of Education.

The session in the Fine Art Department lasts for thirty-six weeks, thirty-three of which are covered by the college terms, while the three additional weeks are given in the winter, with the exception of the life classes and other special classes.

The session, which is divided into three terms, begins in the last week in September.

The studios and workrooms are open for day classes from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., excepting on Saturday, when work ceases at 1.

The fees for the day classes are as follows :

-

One Term

One Session (three terms)

Diploma in fine art (assoeiateship course)..............

s.

d

s.

d

7

o

0

14

0

0

Other courses in fine arts and crafts:

Full time .........

7

0

0

14

0

0

Five days a week.....

6

0

0

12

0

0

Four days a week.....

5

0

0

10

0

0

Three days a week...

4

0

0

8

0

0

Two days a week.....

2

15

0

5

10

0

One day a week ......

1

10

0

3

10

0

Students joining at the half-term are charged one half of the terminal fee, but the full terminal fee is charged to all students joining at the beginning of a term.

In the life room. Painting from life and sculpture from the life proceed simultaneously

In the life room. Painting from life and sculpture from the life proceed simultaneously