When the preliminary shuffling period is passed, the learner will be anxious to acquire the rudiments of the art, to learn the equivalents of finger exercises and scales which are to lead to mastery of rockers, counters, loops, etc., and so on to the concerted movements which are known as " free skating."

The sequence of the elements and figures in their order of relative difficulty is as follows : First come the edges and changes; then the 3's, the loops, the brackets, the rockers and counters ; then follow the changes of edge in combination with the foregoing turns. This list comprises all the so-called "school figures." When the learner has mastered these, everything is possible to her.

It may be said that very few skaters of either sex in any country ever learn all the school figures. To have achieved these is to be a skater of the first class, and such are few.

Before directions are given as to the method of skating the different figures, a few words as to the several styles of skating are necessary. There are two schools, the principles and practice of which are entirely different. The one is • adhered to by a proportion of English skaters, and the other, known as the international style, is followed by every other country where skating is practised, and is that in which

Compulsory. Figures Abbreviations

R - right

L - left.

f - forwards.

b - backwards. o - outside. - inside.

T - Three. Lp - Loop. B - Bracket.

Rk - Rocker. C - Counter.

Figure. No. Description. value

Woman s Recreations The Art Of Skating On Ice 600146Woman s Recreations The Art Of Skating On Ice 600147Woman s Recreations The Art Of Skating On Ice 600148Woman s Recreations The Art Of Skating On Ice 600149Woman s Recreations The Art Of Skating On Ice 600150Woman s Recreations The Art Of Skating On Ice 600151Woman s Recreations The Art Of Skating On Ice 600152Woman s Recreations The Art Of Skating On Ice 600153Woman s Recreations The Art Of Skating On Ice 600154Woman s Recreations The Art Of Skating On Ice 600155Woman s Recreations The Art Of Skating On Ice 600156

Eight.

1

Rfo - Lfo . . . . .

1

2

Rfi - Lfi ... .

1

3

Rbo - Lbo . « •

1

4

2

Change

5 a

Rfoi - Lfio ....

1

b

1

6 a

Rboi - Lbio ....

2

b

Lboi - Rboo .

2

Three

7

RfoTbi - Lfotbi ....

1

8a

RfoTbi - Lbitfo

2

b

LfoTbi - Rbitfo

2

9 a

RfiTbo - Lbotfi ....

1

b

LfiTbo - Rbotfi ....

1

Double-Three

10

RfoTbiTfo - Lfotbitfo . . .

1

11

RfiTboTfi - Lfitbotfi

1

12

RboTfiTbo - Lbotfitbo . .

1

13

RbiTfoTbi - Lbitbotbi .

2

Loop

14

RfoLpfo - Lfolpfo ....

2

15

RfiLpfi- Lfilpfi ....

2

16

RboLpbo - Lbolpbo

2

17

RbiLpbi - Lbilpbi ....

2

Bracket

18 a

RfoBbi - Lbibfo ....

3

5

LfoBbi - Rbibfo ....

3

'19 a

RfiBbo - Lbobfi ....

3

b

LfiBbo - Rbobfi ....

3

Figure. No. Description. Value.

Change - Bracket

32 a

RfoiBbo - Lboibfo ....

3

b

LboiBbo - Rboibfo ....

3

33 a

RfioBbi - Lbiobfi . . .

3

b

LfioBbi - Rbiobfi ....

3

Three - Change - Three

34 a

RfoTbioTfi - Lfitboitfo .

3

b

LfoTbioTfi - Rfitboitfo .

3

35 a

RboTfioTbi - Lbitfoitbo .

3

6

LboTfioTbi - Rbitfoitbo .

3

Dou

Ble - Three - Change - Double -Three

36 a

RfoTbiTfoiTboTfi - Lfitbotfiotbitfo

3

b

LfoTbiTfoiTboTfi - Rfitbotfiotbitfo

3

37 a

RboTfiTboiTfoTbi-LbiTfoTbioTfiTbo

4

6

LboTfiTboiTfoTbi-RbiTfoTbioTfiTbo

4

Loop-Change-Loop

38 a

RfoLpfoiLpfi - Lfilpfiolpfo .

4

b

LfoLpfoiLpfi - Rfilpfiolpfo .

4

39 a

RboLpboiLpbi - Lbilpbiolpbo

5

6

LboLpboiLpbi - Rbilpbiolpbo

5

Bracket - Change - Bracket.

40 a

RfoBbioBfi - Lfibboibfo .

4

b

LfoBbioBfi - Rfibboibfo .

4

41 a

RboBfioBbi - Lbibfoibbo .

4

b

LboBfioBbi - Rbibfoibbo .

4

all international competitions and championships are .held English style skating is of comparatively recent growth Until about I855 English skating, as described and figured by all contemporary writers and artists, was almost indistinguishable as regards style and position from the international style of to-day.

The old books are full of accounts of gentlemen and ladies dancing minuets, etc., on skates; and the following fragment from a poem in that once fashionable periodical Heath's " Book of Beauty " tells us what was in vogue on the Serpentine in I835:

Say, who were the leaders, the gaze of the million,

Who spanned the wide channel on iron-bound heel?

What light unapproachable swam a cotillon (In this Anno Domini dubbed a quadrille) ?

What Jersey, looked after by mothers and daughters, What Bligh,what Argyle, the elite of the set,

Like Pope's young Camilla, fled over the waters ? What Caulfield spun round in a brisk pirouette ?

And we all remember the account of the celebrated reel executed by old Wardle, Benjamin Allen, and Bob Sawyer which excited such enthusiasm among the onlookers.

It appears, however, that about I855 a school of skaters arose which insisted that the arms must be kept to the sides, the elbows turned in, the knees straight, legs and feet touching. Dancing was no more mentioned, and even such figures as loops and crosscuts were frowned upon as "likely to place the learner in positions which plated by the pupil would lead him into bad habits. lhe principles of the international style are briefly :

No. 1. The forward outside eight. This is the figure to be contem  Carriage upright, but not stiff; the body not bent at the waist ; the head upright

No. 1. The forward outside eight. This is the figure to be contem" Carriage upright, but not stiff; the body not bent at the waist ; the head upright ; the tracing leg should always be somewhat bent to give command of action for raising or lowering the body; the knee and toe of the free leg turned outwards, the toe always down, the knee slightly bent. The arms to swing freely, assisting the movement."

The opinion of the writer on the relative merits of the several styles may perhaps be accepted as given by one who has a thorough and practical experience of both.

The writer unhesitatingly approves of the international style, as being a far better physical exercise, giving as it does full and free play to all the limbs. The English style certainly has its merits; there is great enjoyment in a good combined figure; also, in skating the big edges and turns at top speed, but in no way can it be compared to free skating, to a good band, flying, dancing, pirouetting, with the blood racing and all the muscles in play.