The First Ribbons - Various Kinds of Silk Ribbons - How to Form a Ribbon Aigrette - Wiring the

Ribbon - Where to Place the Garniture when Complete

Ribbons were at first merely lengths of silk used for gofferings, gaugings, and general decorative display. These reached the zenith of their beauty in the Pompadour era. Then the great ladies of the French Court used endless yards of the silk on their frocks as well as on their headgear.

There are various kinds of ribbon which are supplied under such wel l-known names as taffeta, satin, velvet, or broche ribbons. Terry poplin, and Chine silks also play an important part in decorative ribbon work. However fashions change, ribbons have, and always will, play an important part in trimming our millinery as well as our frocks.

The illustration depicts a very effective and original mode of utilising a 3-yard remnant of fancy or plain silk ribbon.

The ribbon is cut in half, leaving two 1 1/2-yard lengths.

One length of the ribbon with quarter inch hem at the top, through which a wire is passed

One length of the ribbon with quarter-inch hem at the top, through which a wire is passed

The ribbon gathered on the wire to the exact length required for the crown or aigrette

The ribbon gathered on the wire to the exact length required for the crown or aigrette

The one length is used as a garniture for winding round the crown, and the other to form an aigrette, and give the necessary height at the side.

These aigrettes, as will be seen, are gathered on to a short length of wire.

Take one of the lengths and make a hem about a quarter of an inch deep at the top.

As the hem is destined to be drawn up, it is as well to use strong cotton, also to avoid joins.

Make a firm knot one end and leave a short length of cotton suitable for pulling up at the other.

The next thing is to measure round the crown of the hat to find the exact measurement of wire required for the garniture, which should fit evenly round the crown.

If the crown measures 25 inches round the centre, nip off, with wire nippers, a piece of wire 27 inches long, the extra two inches being allowed for lapping over and preventing the wire from slipping through. One end of the wire should be turned back to prevent the sharp end from cutting through the materials.

Also it enables it to be slipped more easily through the hem.

Wire should always be treated in this manner when used for gauging purposes.

Push the wire through the hem, leaving an inch to project at each end, bending it back as before.

Draw the cotton at the hem up to the size of the crown wire. Equalise the fulness, clip the ends of the wire together, and the garniture will appear complete.

The aigrette at the side is made in exactly the same way, taking a wire 22 inches in length.

If a higher effect is desired, a longer wire may be used.

When the ribbon is wired, double it over, as shown in the sketch.

Place the garniture round the hat, poising the aigrette at the angle shown in the illustration.

Any ribbon that is not too thick can be utilised for this mode of trimmng. It is simple, effective, very cheap, and uncommon.

Glace ribbon, perhaps, is the easiest of all to manipulate. It also has the advantage of being specially cheap, and is produced in many lovely and fashionable shades. The low sum of 6 3/4d. per yard is quite enough to give for a thin glace ribbon, which is admirably suited to the making of ribbon aigrettes.

Another practical use of the ribbon mount is that it can be used discreetly to cover the faded part of a last year's straw shape, or perhaps hide an insertion of another straw that has been put in to increase the height of the crown; or to alter an old shape into a newer one.

The ribbon joined and the gathered crown ready for placing on the hat

The ribbon joined and the gathered crown ready for placing on the hat

The aigrette ready for mounting on crown

The aigrette ready for mounting on crown

Sometimes entire crowns are made of goffered glace, but these are apt to be heavy, and are not so smart.

Bordered ribbons are also popular for millinery, and a large variety of fancy silks may be suggested for hat trimming.

Silk, in the piece, however, has to be cut into strips, and this involves much hemming and extra work, which, in the end, is apt to be suggestive of the amateur. Ribbons, on the other hand, can be had in all widths by the yard, and if treated after the methods given here always look smart and cost but little.

The floral aigrette is another important form of hat trimming, and is certainly a pretty garniture for the lace and muslin hats suitable for real summer weather. Like every other pretty conceit the floral aigrette comes again and again into fashion.

The tulle aigrette is also a summery adornment, and is often revived in conjunction with the tulle neckwear that is such a dainty finish to woman's dress. But to return to the charm and uses of ribbons. Ribbon flowers are always quaint and dainty for our dresses as well as our hats, and are particularly favoured as a trimming when fashions are more or less borrowed from the eighteenth century, and those of mid-victorian tendencies.

During the colder months of the year we have been wearing wreaths of wool flowers round our boudoir caps and beaver hats. Now these have given place to flowers of ribbon and tissue in addition to the usual plethora of artificial silks, velvet, and other floral decoration.

The clever amateur who can manipulate flowers out of oddments of silk and satin will find herself have a petticoat or under-flounce of lace or chiffon, decorated with rows of ribbon bows and flowers; often the centres of these flowers are of gold and silver tissue. Fancy gauze narrow ribbons are also pleated up, and make an edge, or extra decoration to wreaths and floral festoons. It is distinctly a ribbon season. Fanciful plaids and ribbon gauzes are used even on our most severe tailored coats.

Cathered crown and aigrette completed ready for mounting oi hat a great help to the home dressmaker as well as the milliner.

Cathered crown and aigrette completed ready for mounting oi hat a great help to the home dressmaker as well as the milliner.

Most of our young girls' dancing frocks

Imitation canvas ribbon scarves are always popular as a simple trimming for Panama and river hats.

To the feminine mind much of the charm ol the vogue for ribbon in miilinery lies in the fact that it is possible at the expenditure of little time and money to vary the effect of a hat to suit different costumes. Hence both freshness and variety are ensured by this development of Dame Fashion, a result for which those with exchequers more limited than their tastes should be devoutly thankful.

Ribbon mounts are smart and serviceable, and can be made without difficulty by the home milliner

Ribbon mounts are smart and serviceable, and can be made without difficulty by the home milliner