Gold Lace and Braid Spray for the Hair - Lace and Galon

The rose spray in gold lace as illustrated below is most effective, the leaves being formed of the lace stretched over wire supports.

Gold Lace and Braid Spray for the Hair

Very much the same method is used in making a spray for the hair with gold lace and narrow braid, but in this case a yard and a half of gold lace is used in conjunction with dark bronze covered wire. The bronze will be found a much less obtrusive colour than gold or yellow wire.

The braid is used to cover the wire for the stems of the spray, and also for loops to give a light effect with the leaves. These are of lace stretched across the wire, as in the other sprays. The blossoms should be caught together as lightly as possible, the spray being intended for wear as a hair ornament.

Lace And Galon

In the very handsome gold spray illustrated on page 4573, two different kinds of lace are used - an open-work type in a handsome torchon pattern and a thick wavy edged galon.

Commence the flower in the centre by covering a thimble-sized piece of galon with the gold lace. Wind round this alternate layers of lace and galon until a roselike piece appears with the top of the petal shapes all curving inwards. Continue to wind the two materials, but more loosely, and, when the rose is large enough, cut both lace and galon and tuck the ends in neatly.

A spray for the coiffure, fashioned in gold lace and narrow braid

A spray for the coiffure, fashioned in gold lace and narrow braid

The foundation wire in this group is closely wound round with gold thread, such as is used for church embroidery. It is called Japanese gold, and adds considerably to the effect of the spray, although it is not essential, a bronze green covered wire being an alternative.

Each leaf is made separately from a 3-inch length of galon, gathered up in the centre into the required shape, and then firmly sewn to the gold - covered wire.

A group of three leaves makes the most effective imitation of the rose leaf. When half a dozen of these are made, fasten on at the back of the rose very firmly, and the spray is ready for use.

A handsome gold rose spray, in torchon lace, suitable for a toque, muff, or corsage ornament

A handsome gold rose spray, in torchon lace, suitable for a toque, muff, or corsage ornament

The Vogue of Hand made Trimmings   How to Draw the Circles   A Pattern on Black Chiffon   Notes on Colouring   A Pretty Scarf   Bodice Trimmings   Entre deux of Bugle Trimming A Dainty Feature of a Debutante's Dress

The Vogue of Hand-made Trimmings - How to Draw the Circles - A Pattern on Black Chiffon - Notes on Colouring - A Pretty Scarf - Bodice Trimmings - Entre-deux of Bugle Trimming A Dainty Feature of a Debutante's Dress

Mow that so much hand-work is lavished upon the house dresses of the well-clad woman, it is useful to know of trimmings that can be made very quickly. The bugle employed thereon, being six times as large as an ordinary bead, gives a corresponding effect in decoration, yet is not coarse in appearance, because it has a length and slimness which makes for smartness.

In tracing any pattern where a curved line or simple straight lines are required, bugle trimming is most easy and effective, either in conjunction with the old, rounded bead or by itself.

The pattern shown, worked on black chiffon, shows an edging of very small gold beads. At the extreme edge, on either side, a half-circle is drawn by the aid of a claret glass or small tumbler. This circle is worked first in chainstitch in white sewing silk, then in a curved line in the same small beads as those used for the edging.

Now make a second curve, one-eighth of an inch lower, of small bugle beads. Those used in the pattern are of iridescent gold, green, and blue. Two other inner lines will fill up the half-circle. Bright gold beads are strung for the three radiating lines.

These ornamental half-circles, or glorified "spider webs," are worked at two-inch intervals, springing separately from the top and the bottom of the complete edging. The groundwork may be left plain or be stitched over, as in the model, with a running pattern in ornamental silks.

This narrow border is intended for a neck or sleeve edging. The wider border, for which a large-sized tumbler is used for the circles, is suitable for the edge of the turn, and is supplemented with a cleverly-made fringe of mixed bugles and round beads.

Four half-circles of bugles are used in this large pattern, which measures five inches in width, exclusive of fringe; the circles are four inches apart along each edge. Combined with the all-over filling stitch, a very handsome effect is obtained.

Black chiffon, ornamented with a running pattern of silk, and spiders' webs in bugles and beads, forms a handsome edging for the neck and sleeves of a gown

Black chiffon, ornamented with a running pattern of silk, and spiders' webs in bugles and beads, forms a handsome edging for the neck and sleeves of a gown

The colouring in black, gold, and green iridescent beads, worked on a black ground, might be varied indefinitely. Silver grey soft silk, or chiffon can be worked with silver beads and bugles of pink and grey iridescence. Such nuances in beads are now to be found in well-stocked shops, but if choice is limited, it would be well for the intending worker to choose the beads first and then match with chiffon and sewing silk where there may be a wider range of colouring from which to choose.