Pineapple Juice...............

32 fl. ounces.

Sugar.......................

128 ounces.

Water......,.................

32 fl. ounces.

Mix the Pineapple Juice and Water, and dissolve the Sugar, by percolating, with the mixture.

The above three are samples only of the many that may be prepared in a similar way.

Fruit Syrup of Strawberry. b

Strawberry Juice..................

1 pint.

Sugar............................

24 ounces.

Syrup, sufficient quantity. Solution of citric acid, the same.

The strawberry juice, in the above formula, is prepared by taking a sufficient quantity of the fruit, properly picking and cleaning, then covering slightly with sugar. Allow to stand for twelve (12) hours, express; add to one (1) pint the Sugar; dissolve with heat; strain and bottle while hot, and keep in a cool place. When wanted for use, add an equal bulk of plain syrup and a small quantity of solution of citric acid.

The same method may be used for all other fruits from which the concentrated syrups are prepared.

Fruit Syrup of Apricot

Take of apricot paste* and water equal parts; heat gently, then add as much more water; continue the heat for a few moments, strain to remove the coarser portions of the pulp, and add to the liquid one and one-half its weight of sugar.

*Imported Apricot Paste is to be found on the market.

Fruit Syrup of Banana

To each pound of banana pulp add gradually the same weight of hot water, heat gently; strain and add sugar three (3) pounds.

Fruit Syrup of Peach

The pulp of ripe peaches is thoroughly mixed* with its own weight of water, gradually added; then pass through a moderately coarse strainer; to each quart add three (3) pounds of sugar, and dissolve.

This syrup may be closely approached in flavor by adding to apricot syrup one (1) quart, strawberry juice four (4) to six (6) ounces.

Fruit Syrup of Tamarind

From select pulp of tamarinds, by the same formula as for peach.

Fruit Syrup of Plum

This is frequently made by treating selected prunes with hot water, to extract their flavor and a portion of the pulp, and made as banana. But it is better made direct from the ripe fruit and acceptably from canned fruit.

*Best done by using a Keystone beater.

106 Monograph on

Fruit Syrup of Grape

This syrup is made from the unfermented grape juice by adding syrup. It is agreeable and there can be no objection to its use, as is sometimes urged when brandy is used.

Nectar Syrup. a

Vanilla Syrup..................

40 fl. ounces.

Pineapple Syrup...............

8 fl. ounces.

Strawberry Syrup..............

16 fl. ounces.

Mix well.

Nectar Syrup. b

Pineapple Syrup..................

1 part.

Lemon Syrup......................

1 part.

Vanilla Syrup......................

3 parts.

Mix well.

Sherbert Syrup. a

Vanilla Syrup

48 fl. ounces.

Pineapple Syrup................

16 fl. ounces.

Lemon Syrup.................

16 fl. ounces.

Mix well.

Now, although this formula and the previous one are from equally good authority, they will not bear close comparison as to difference.

Sherbert Syrup. b

Orange Syrup.......................

1 part.

Pineapple Syrup ...........................................................

1 part.

Vanilla Syrup.......................

1 part.

Frambois Syrup

Raspberry Syrup...................

1 pint.

Currant Syrup......................

2 pints.

Mix well.

The various fruit syrups, mixed, give rise to many other names.

Maple Syrup

Maple Sugar (pure)...............

3 pounds.

Water..........................

2 pints.

Mix and dissolve by a gentle heat.

If the syrup can be obtained pure (which it is hard to do), it may be mixed with an equal bulk of simple or rock candy syrup.

Cream Syrup. a

Cream............................

1 pint.

Milk..............................

1 pint.

Sugar.............................

1 pound.

Mix, dissolve without heat.

If this mixture is bottled at once and kept upon ice, it will keep well for from four to eight days.

Cream Syrup. b

Condensed Milk (without sugar). .

1 pint.

Water (previously boiled and cooled)

1 pint.

Sugar..................................................

1 1/2 pounds.

Mix and dissolve without heat.

Cream Syrup. c

Condensed Milk (with sugar). .

1 can or 1/2 pint.

Water (previously boiled and cooled....................

1/2 pint.

Syrup (thin).................

1 pint.

Mix and dissolve without heat.

Nectar Cream Syrup

Cream Syrup.......................

6 pints.

Vanilla Syrup......................

3 pints.

Pineapple Syrup....................

1 pint.

Lemon Syrup.......................

1 pint.

Mix well and color with tincture of cochineal, a sufficient quantity.

Orgeat Syrup

Cream Syrup......................

1 pint.

Vanilla Syrup......................

1 pint.

Oil of Bitter Almond (or extract, 2 fl. drams)..........................

4 drops.

Mix well together and observe not to make more than sufficient for one day's sales, unless precautions given under cream syrup be observed.

Syrup of Fruti Fru

Extract of Orange...............

4 fl. drams.

Extract of Lemon...... ................................

6 fl. drams.

Extract of Vanilla..............

4 fl. drams.

Solution of Citric Acid..........

3 fl. ounces.

Syrup (thin).....................................

1 gallon.

Solution of caramel and solution of cochineal, of each a sufficient quantity to produce a healthy color.

Mix the flavoring extracts with the syrup and afterward add the solutions and mix well.

Walnut or Hickorynut Cream Syrup

Take one (1) pound of hickory-nut or walnut kernels and remove the skin by blanching, which, if left on, would give an unpleasant, bitter taste; then powder in a wedge wood or porcelain mortar, adding a few drops of lemon juice to prevent the separation of the oil in kernels; also water, gradually added, to make a thick emulsion. As fast as the kernels are reduced, put them in a linen cloth, which should be gathered around them, so that they may be squeezed through the cloth. Whatever is left in the cloth is to be returned to the mortar and pulverized further; the lemon juice and water being added as needed. All should eventually pass through the strainer.

The result of this process, about two (2) pints, is to be added to two (2) quarts of cream syrup.

This formula may be varied, and perhaps improved, by a slight addition of extract of lemon or vanilla, or any other flavor to suit the taste; likewise a little coloring to suit the fancy. It will well repay the labor of preparing it.

Chocolate Syrup. a

Chocolate (powdered)...........

8 ounces.

Sugar.........................

64 ounces.

Water.........................

32 fl. ounces.

Mix the Chocolate with the Water and stir thoroughly over a slow fire, at boiling point, for a few minutes; strain; add the Sugar and dissolve.

Chocolate Syrup. b

Chocolate (powdered)............

1 pound.

Water......................

4 pints.

Sugar...........................

4 pounds.

Extract of Vanilla...............

1 fl. ounce.

Extract of Cinnamon.............

1/4 fl. ounce.

Mix the Chocolate and Water well together in a mortar; transfer to a porcelain-lined kettle; add the Sugar; bring to the boiling point, with constant stirring; remove from the source of heat; continue the stirring for some minutes; when cold, add the Extract of Vanilla and Extract of Cinnamon and enough Syrup to make one (1) gallon.

*Much depends on the proper selection of the chocolate used. See p. iii, publisher's department.