Raspberry Wine

Select good, plump, ripe raspberries, look over, and wash, letting them drain until quite dry; then mash in an earthen or granite dish, and pour into a jelly-bag or two thicknesses of cheese-cloth, and squeeze out all the juice. The berries may be cooked before getting out the juice; but the cooked seeds give the juice a spicy taste. Some, however, like this taste, while others prefer to have the fruit uncooked. Heat the juice to the boiling-point, and can without sugar.

Blackberry Wine

Make in the same way as raspberry wine, and can without sugar.

Currant Wine

Select good, ripe fruit, wash well, and pick from the stems. Place them in an earthen or granite pan, and mash the berries. Put into a strong jelly-bag, and squeeze out all the juice possible. Then heat the juice, and can the same as other wines.

Cherry Wine

Select the sweet black cherry, pull off the stems, and reject all wormy ones. Wash well, and cook in a granite stew-pan, adding enough water nearly to cover them, and stirring quite often. Allow it to cool, and pour into a jelly-bag, squeezing all the juice out. Reheat to the boiling-point, and can the same as other wines.

Other cherries may be used, but the wine will be more acid.

Plum Wine

Most of the plum family are too acid to make palatable wine. However, the Goldendrop is an exception. Wash well, and remove the stems. Place in a granite stew-pan, adding enough water nearly to cover them. Cook slowly for an hour or more. Pour into a funnel-shaped bag, and allow the fruit to drain, being careful not to squeeze it or the pulp may go through the bag, into the juice, causing it to lose its clearness. Reheat the juice, and can without sugar the same as other wines. After the juice is taken out, the pulp that is left in the bag may be sifted through the colander, and used for sauce.

Quince Wine

Select fruit as nearly ripe as possible, wash well, and cut into eighths without paring, but remove the core. Cook slowly in a granite stew-pan for two hours. Pour into a jellybag, and allow it to drain. Do not squeeze. Reheat juice, and when boiling hot, seal in glass cans. The quality of the wine may be improved by cooking an equal quantity of sweet apples with the quinces.

Sweet-Apple Wine

Select some sweet apples of good flavor, such as the Talman sweet, golden sweet, or Bailey's sweet. Wash well, cut into pieces, without paring or removing the core, cook slowly for two hours, and pour into a jelly-bag, allowing all the juice to drain out that will without squeezing the bag. Heat the juice to the boiling-point, and can the same as other wines.

Mulberry Wine

Gather the mulberries fresh from the tree, mash well, and put into a jelly-bag, squeezing out all the juice possible. Sweeten slightly, heat to the boiling-point, and can in the same manner as other wines.