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Guide For Nut Cookery | by Almeda Lambert



Together with a brief history of nuts and their food values.

TitleGuide For Nut Cookery
AuthorAlmeda Lambert
PublisherJoseph Lambert & Co
Year1898
Copyright1898, Almeda Lambert
AmazonGuide to nut cookery
Guide For nut Cookery
-Introduction
For nearly six thousand years, one of the choicest, most healthful, and most nutritious articles of food that was assigned by the Creator for man's diet, has been but little used, at least by the civi...
-Almonds
The name of this nut is supposed to be derived from the word amysso, meaning to lacerate, on account of the prominent, sharp, knife-like margin of one edge of the nut. The English name is from the Lat...
-Beechnut
The Latin and botanical name for the tree is fagus, and was derived from the Greek word p h a go , which means to eat, alluding to the fact that the nuts have been considered good eating by the inhabi...
-Brazil-Nut
Brazil-nuts are also called Para-nuts and cream nuts. They are the triangular edible seeds of a South American tree, belonging to the Myrtle family (Bertholletin execessa). The tree attains a height ...
-Cashew Nut
This is a tropical American shrub or small tree, belonging to the Cashew family, or Anacardium occidentale. It is now naturalized in Africa and Asia. The tree is an evergreen, with entire, feather-ve...
-Castanopsis
The name of this tree was derived from Castanea, the chestnut. It is an evergreen tree intermediate between the oak and the chestnut. There are several varieties in the Old World and in the islands of...
-Chestnut
The chestnut belongs to the Oak family and to the group Castanea. The sterile flowers cluster in long catkins, and appear in the axils of the leaves. The fertile flowers are near the base of the last ...
-Chufa (Earth Almond)
Chufa is a grass-like plant, indigenous to the countries bordering on the Mediterranean Sea, and cultivated for its nut-like, sweet tubers, called Chufa or Earth Almonds. It belongs to the Sedge fami...
-Cocoanut
The cocoanut is the largest edible nut in our markets, and is very widely known. It is sold in the markets with the outer husk removed, but with long, bristly fibers adhering to the very hard, thick s...
-Filbert, Or Hazelnut
The hazelnut is a bush or small tree, belonging to the Oak family (Cupuliferae)i producing edible nuts of a dark-brown color. The staminate flower appears in the autumn, in cylindrical catkins, remain...
-Groundnut
The groundnut is a tuber of a widely distributed climbing plant, common in low, wet grounds, almost everywhere, from Canada to Florida, and westward to the Mississippi. This plant is described in most...
-Hickory-Nut
The hickory-nut belongs to the juglandaceae, or Walnut family, and to the group Carya. Of this there are several varieties : The Carya Olivaeformis, (pecan-nut), Alba (shell-bark or shagbark), Sulcata...
-Litchi (Leechee Nut)
The Litchi nut is more of a fruit than a nut. The tree grows in southern China and the Philippine Islands, and belongs to the Soapberry family (Sapindaceae). The tree grows about twenty-five feet hig...
-Peanut
The peanut is the fruit of a trailing plant, botanically called Arachis hypogaea, which belongs to the bean family (Leguminosae). It is known in different localities as the earthnut, groundnut, ground...
-Pecans
The pecan is a variety of the hickory-nut, growing in the valley of the Mississippi River and its tributaries as far north as Ohio. It is also found very plentifully in Texas. The trees are tall but u...
-Sapucaia-Nut
This is the Brazilian name of a large forest tree growing in the valley of the Amazon. Botanically it is called Lecy-this Zabucajo and belongs to the Myrtle family. It is closely allied to the Brazil-...
-Souari-Nut
This nut is a native of British Guiana, and is the fruit of the Coryocar Nuciferum, a magnificent tree growing one hundred feet high, with a trunk two or three feet in diameter. Botanically it belongs...
-Pine-Nut
The botanical name for the pine is Pinus, and is derived from the Latin word pix picis, which means the tree that produces pitch. The nut-pines are those trees which produce seed large enough to be co...
-Walnut
Juglans is a Latin name contracted from Jovis glans, meaning the nut of Jupiter. It is said that the name was first used by Pliny, a Roman writer of the time of Pompeii. They are medium-sized decid...
-Water Chestnut
These are also known as Water Caltrops. They are the seeds of several species of water plants of the genus Trapa, of the Evening Primrose family {Onagraceae). There are several species of these nuts....
-Foods
Food is that which taken into the body forms blood, muscles, and brain. It naturally follows that in order to have good blood and strong muscles, one must partake of good, nutritious food. That which...
-Guide For Nut Cookery
It is therefore necessary that the housewife and mother should be careful that the meal contains both elements in as nearly the right proportion as possible. Too much food of either element is harmful...
-A Perfect Diet
A Perfect diet is one which gives the most strength with the least taxation on the vital forces, and the least encouragement to intemperance. In the beginning God gave to man a perfect diet - fruits ...
-Bad Food Combinations
Milk and sugar, fruits and vegetables, and fruits and nitrogenous foods. Some use milk and a large amount of sugar on mush, thinking they are carrying out health reform; but the sugar and milk combin...
-Nuts Properties And Food Values
nut foods are practically a new thing among the civilized people of the world. Only a few years have elapsed since they have been used at all; but so well are they being received by all classes of peo...
-Nut Butter
Nut Butter The production of nut butter is a very simple process. The peanut and almond are the nuts that are chiefly used for this purpose; but the Brazil-nuts make a very fine butter. All of the nu...
-Nut Cream
Peanut Cream For making cream, the peanuts should not be roasted so much as for making butter. They should have a light straw color. Then grind them very fine, and to a tablespoonful of nut butter ad...
-Nut Milk
Peanut Milk Make like the peanut cream, only add more water. The amount of nut butter to be used depends upon the richness of the milk desired. Almond Milk Dissolve 1 tablespoonful of almond butt...
-Nut Meal
Peanut Meal Heat the nuts sufficiently to remove the skins; but do not brown them. Blanch and look over. Boil until real tender, taking care to have them quite dry when done. Drain off all the water ...
-Sausages
Hickory-Nut Sausage To 1 cup of hickory-nut meal, add 1 egg, a pinch each of salt and sage, and 2 teaspoonfuls of gluten. Mix well, adding the well-beaten egg the last, form into round cakes with the...
-Nut Oil
Nut Oil No. 1 Prepare cocoanut the same as for making cocoanut cream; then grind it through a nut-butter mill until it is quite fine. To 1 cup of this add 5 or 6 cups of water, and boil in a kettle f...
-Nutora
IN order to have these foods a perfect success, care must be taken to have them well cooked. They are better if cooked in sealed cans, and under a high pressure of steam, as they will then be quite so...
-Nutora. Part 2
Peanut And Almond Nutora Take 1 cup of almond butter, made from good, sweet almonds, 2 cups of raw peanut butter, salt to taste, and 1 1/2 cups of water, or enough so it can be beaten, but it must be...
-Nutora. Part 3
Almond Nutora No. 2 Take 2 cups of almond butter made from the roasted almonds, 2 cups of water, 2 1/2 teaspoonfuls of salt, 1 cup of corn-starch. Mix all the ingredients thoroughly, and cook in cans...
-Nutmeato
Nutmeato No. 1 Take 2 1/2 cups of strong coffee made from cereal coffee, 2 cups of nut butter, 1 cup of corn-starch, and 1 teaspoon-ful of salt. Combine the ingredients by mixing the cornstarch, butt...
-Nutgrano
Nutmeato Steak Take nutmeato that has been cooked in cans about three inches in diameter. Remove from can by cutting around edge of the can, and pressing on the bottom, cut off into slices one-half i...
-Nutmeatose
Nutmeatose No. 1 Take 2 cups of peanut butter, 2 1/2 cups of water, 3 table-spoonfuls of No. 3 gluten, and 1 teaspoonful of salt. Mix all the ingredients together very thoroughly, and cook in cans. (...
-Frutose
Take 1/2 cup peanut butter, 1/2 cup of almond butter, and 1 dozen medium-sized bananas. Peel the bananas, and mash them through a vegetable press, or mash with a silver fork. Then add the nut butter, ...
-Butter For Table
Put one half the amount of butter required for a meal into a bowl, and dilute with an equal quantity of water, adding a little at a time, and beating it thoroughly with a fork until it is perfectly sm...
-Roast Goose
Take 6 tablespoonfuls of zwieola, pour over it 2 1/2 cups of water, and let it soak for fifteen minutes. Then add 4 hard-boiled eggs, which have been sifted through a fine sieve, and the yolks of 3 eg...
-Turkey Legs
Take 1/2 cup of water, 2 hard-boiled eggs, 2 tablespoonfuls of pecan meal, 1 teaspoonful peanut butter, a little sage and salt, 2 tablespoonfuls of zwieola, and 2 tablespoonfuls of gluten. Boil the eg...
-Chicken Legs
First prepare the meat of the mock chicken by mixing 2 tablespoonfuls of pecan meal, 1 tablespoonful nut butter, and 1/4cup of hickory cream, 2 tablespoonfuls of zwieola, 2 tablespoonfuls of gluten, 1...
-Roast Turkey
To make a good-sized turkey, take 20 heaping tablespoon-fuls of zwieola, 20 tablespoonfuls of No. 3 gluten, 8 table-spoonfuls of pecan meal, 8 tablespoonfuls of roasted almond meal, 8 tablespoonfuls o...
-Nut Lobster
Take 1 pound of pine-nuts, wash and put them in the oven, and roast to a light-brown color; then grind or mash them to a butter. To 1 1/2 of this butter take 1 1/2 cups of water, I cup of corn-starch,...
-Baked Trout
Take 1 cup of raw peanut butter, 1 cup of tomato squeezed through a cheese-cloth, 1 cup of corn-starch, and 1 heaping teaspoonful of salt; mix all together very thoroughly and beat for five minutes. M...
-Mock Fish Stuffed And Baked
Take 6 cups of water; 1 1/2 cups of white corn grits or white corn-meal; 1 teaspoonful of salt. When the water boils, add the salt and stir in the grits, continuing to stir until it boils; let it boi...
-Mock Turkey
Take 3 cups of sifted lentils, 1 cup of walnut butter, 1 pound of zwieback moistened with water, 3 heaping teaspoon-fuls of powdered sage, 1 cup of gluten, and 2 teaspoonfuls of salt. Add 2 eggs. Form...
-Mock Fish-Balls
Take 1 pound of nutora chopped fine, 1 cup of almond meal, 3 cups of white bread-crumbs soaked in 1/2 cup of water (perhaps more water will have to be added if the bread is dry, but use as little as p...
-Vegetable Nut Roast
Put to soak overnight 4 cups of red kidney beans. In the morning cook in plenty of water until they are tender, then put them through a colander, and put with them two-thirds as much nut butter as bea...
-Deviled Nuts
Deviled Nuts No. J Take 1 cup peanut meal, 1 cup bread-crumbs, 1/2 cup nut cream, 1/2 teaspoonful grated onion, 2 hard-boiled eggs, 1 tablespoonful chopped parsley, salt to taste. Mix the meal and br...
-Red Bean Roast
Take 1 can or 2 cups of red kidney bean pulp, 1/2 cup of liquid (milk or water), 1 cup of rolled English walnuts, or 1/4 cup of black walnuts, 1 teaspoonful of sage, 1 of salt. Mix together thoroughly...
-Crystal Wheat Roast
Take 1 cup of crystal wheat, 1 cup of boiling water; steam fifteen minutes; then stir into it 1 cup of nut butter after moistening it with enough water to make it creamy; salt, and bake in moderate ov...
-Escalloped Mock Salmon
Steam 1 cup of browned rice twenty minutes. Place in a baking pan a layer of the mock salmon cut in small pieces, then a layer of the browned rice, and so on, until the pan is filled. Cover the top wi...
-Savory Lentils
Soak a portion of lentils overnight, skim them from this water, and put in cold water, raising gradually to boiling-point. When thoroughly tender, pass them through a reasonably fine colander. To one ...
-A Nut Cheese Nest
Take 1 1/2 cups of raw peanut butter, 1 cup of corn-meal (white), 3 1/2 cups of water, and 1/2 cup of lemon-juice. Mix all the ingredients thoroughly and cook the same as nutmeato. When thoroughly col...
-Mock Chicken Croquettes
Take 1 1/2 pounds or 1 1/2 pints of nutmeato chopped quite fine; add nearly as much mashed potato, 4 tablespoonfuls of zwieola which has been soaked for fifteen minutes in 1/2 cup of warm water, and 4...
-Nut Cheese Nest
Mock Chicken CroqueTTes sible; then roll them in a beaten egg and then in gluten, or what is better, fine cracker-crumbs; crisps or rolls that are perfectly dry and ground fine are also nice, and g...
-Mock Fried Oysters
Scrape some parsnips and cut slantwise to get the oval-shaped slice. Let them stand in cold water for half an hour. Then put into a saucepan, putting on plenty of cold water, and let it get boiling ho...
-Egg Butter
Take 1 pint of raw nut milk, and cook it for three hours in a double boiler, stirring it quite often to keep it from getting lumpy. Then to 1 cup of the cooked milk to which has been added 1 teaspoonf...
-Cutlets Of Potato
Take a can of nutmeato, - one that is about four inches in diameter makes the best size; slice it crosswise into slices about half an inch thick. Cut the slices into halves, and then with a sharp knif...
-Mock Oyster Patties
Make a pastry dough by using 1 cup of fine almond meal or pine-nut meal, 1 cup of white flour, and enough cold water to mix. Mix the meal and flour, pour on the water a little at a time, and stir into...
-Green Pea Patties
Take green peas, or canned peas will do. Make the patties the same as for oyster patties. After removing the inside of the patties, fill with the peas about two-thirds full, and pour over them the jui...
-Nutmeato Patties
Make a puff-paste and cut into patties as directed for mock oyster patties. Cut some nutmeato into small cubes, cover with water, and cook for two hours in a double boiler; then thicken the juice with...
-Mock Chip Beef
Take plain nutmeato, slice it (or chip it) quite thin, let it stand overnight in an open dish covered with a cheese-cloth to keep off the dust. The outside will become somewhat dry and oily. In the mo...
-Malt Extract
Malt is any grain artificially germinated, so as to induce certain changes in the construction of the seed. Barley is the variety of grain usually employed for making malt. The barley is first screene...
-Malted Nut Caramels
Malted Nut Caramels No. I Take 2 cups of nut butter, 1 cup of malt extract, 1/2 cup of No. 3 gluten. A little salt may be added if desired. Thoroughly mix ingredients, and mold into squares or any de...
-Nut Flakes
Take any of the malted caramels, Nos. 1, 2, and 6 are very nice. Roll them out very thin, as thin as paper if possible. A clean clothes-wringer will roll them thinner than they can be rolled with a ro...
-Malted Nuts
Malted Peanuts Take 1 1/2 cups of peanut meal, .1/2 cup of malt extract, a small pinch of salt; rub all together, and dry in the oven or where it is warm, being careful not to scorch it. The malt sco...
-Sweet Potato Pone
Peel and grate sweet potatoes enough to make a quart, grating as quickly as possible that they may not become discolored. Add to them 1 1/2 cups of nut cream, 1 tablespoonful of malt, the juice and a ...
-Grains
Grains are the most nutritious of all foods, and if properly cooked and masticated, they are easily digested. The grains are all similar in composition, varying in the relative amounts of the various ...
-Cooking Corn
Corn Corn contains about three times as much fatty matter as the other grains. It is not so easily digested as wheat, and is not a suitable diet for some stomachs. Corn contains 9.7 per cent. of albu...
-Raw-Butter Rolls
Raw-Butter Rolls No. 1 Take 2 1/2 cups of flour (seconds), 1/3 cup of raw nut butter, 2/3 cup of water, and a pinch of salt. Sift and measure the flour. Dissolve the butter in the water, working unti...
-Cooking Of Grains
Cracked Wheat Put 1 quart of water in the inner cup of a double boiler. When hot, stir into it 1 cup of cracked wheat, adding a little salt if desired. Let it cook rapidly until the kernels cease to ...
-Cooking Of Grains. Part 2
Oatmeal Mush Pour into the inner part of the double boiler 1 quart of water. When hot, stir into it 1 cup of rolled oats, and let it boil rapidly until it thickens; then set in the outer part of the ...
-Cooking Of Grains. Part 3
Golden Rice Take 1 cup of rice, 2 1/2 cups water, and 1/2 cup nut cream; mix well, and steam for forty-five minutes. Then add 1 egg, which should be well beaten, and steam just long enough to set the...
-Cooking Of Grains. Part 4
Macaroni With Nutmeato Boil the macaroni as in the recipe for boiled macaroni, then drain and put a layer of it in the bottom of a pudding dish, then put over it a layer of nutmeato which has been gr...
-Cooking Of Grains. Part 5
Water Gems Take 1/2 cup of nut meal, 1 cup of ice-cold water, and whole-wheat or graham flour sufficient to make a batter. Beat thoroughly for from five to ten minutes. Bake in hot gem irons in a qui...
-Cooking Of Grains. Part 6
Filbert Gems Take 1 pound of filberts in the shell, remove kernels from shells, and grind to a meal. Beat 3 eggs thoroughly, add 3 cups of water, and beat in 3 cups of whole-wheat or graham flour, af...
-Cooking Of Grains. Part 7
Milk Gems Cook some raw peanut milk in a double boiler for two hours, and then set it in a cool place until morning. Then take 1 1/2 cups of the milk, 1 egg, a little salt, and enough flour to make a...
-Cooking Of Grains. Part 8
Unleavened Biscuit Take 4 eggs, 4 tablespoonfuls of nut butter, 4 cups of granose flakes, salt to taste. Beat whites and yolks separately, and to the yolks add the nut butter and salt; beat to cream,...
-Quick Yeast Bread
The potato yeast is the best for bread making, as the bread keeps moist longer, and there is no danger of injuring the flavor of the bread by using too much. A fine-grained and very sweet bread may be...
-Shortcakes
To 1 pint of warm -water, add from 1/3 to 1/2 cake of compressed yeast or its equivalent in some other kind. Use sifted flour sufficient to make a stiff sponge. It will rise in three or four hours if ...
-Yeast Breads
Hop Yeast Place 1 handful of hops in a cheese-cloth bag, and boil in 2 quarts of water for fifteen minutes; then remove the bag, and pour the boiling tea over I pint of white Hour, to which has been ...
-Yeast Breads. Part 2
Brown Bread Select good wheat from the granary or grist-mill, wash it, and remove all foreign substances. Soak it overnight. Put it in a cloth sack, and steam it until plump, but not soft. Spread thi...
-Yeast Breads. Part 3
Parker-House Biscuit Take I quart of sifted flour, 1 pint of warm nut milk, 1 tablespoonful of white sugar, 1 teaspoonful of salt, nutcoa one half the size of an egg, and 1/2 cake of yeast. Sift the ...
-Raised Cannelons
Take I cup of bread sponge, and add 1/4 cup of thick raw nut cream and 1 egg. Work well together, and add flour to roll out well until about one fourth of an inch thick; then cut into strips nearly an...
-Oyster Soup And Dumplings
Take 1 pint of raw peanut milk, and cook in a double boiler for two hours, stirring occasionally to keep it from being lumpy or from separating. At the same time the soup is put on, prepare some veget...
-Sandwiches
Nut-Butter Sandwiches Spread thin slices of bread, with nut butter. Chop some dates, figs, or seedless raisins into a fine mass, and spread upon the buttered bread, placing upon this, buttered side d...
-Sandwiches. Continued
Nutmeato And Egg Sandwiches Take 1 cup of grated nutmeato, 2 hard-boiled eggs, salt, and celery salt to suit the taste. Sift the eggs through a fine wire sieve, add the grated nutmeato, and rub smoot...
-Crackers
Crackers can never be very successfully made in the private family, as it requires machinery to knead them hard enough, and also to roll them out; but if one can not afford to buy crackers, very good ...
-Oatmeal Crackers
Take 1 pound of oatmeal (not the rolled oats), 1 3/4 cups of water, 1/4 cup of sugar, 1 1/4 cups of nut meal, and 1 teaspoonful of salt. Mix the water, salt, sugar, and nut meal together, and knead in...
-Fruit Crackers
Make a dough as directed for Rolls No. 2 or No. 3 (see index). Divide the dough into halves, and roll out each half until a little less than a quarter of an inch thick. Spread one half of the dough wi...
-Croutons
Something which requires mastication should always be eaten with soup. A very palatable as well as economical article is prepared as follows: Cut stale bread into cubes of convenient size, place on ti...
-Corn Bread With Eggs
Chop 1/2 cup of nut butter, either almond or peanut, with 1 quart of corn-meal. Add 1 teaspoonful of salt, 1 quart of cold nut milk, and the yolks of 4 eggs. Beat all to a smooth batter; then fold in ...
-Granose With Honey
Take some granose and heat in the oven until nice and crisp, then take some honey in a spoon and slowly let it drip over the granose, tossing it up at the same time. Serve dry; it has a taste like pop...
-Zwieola And Hot Cream
Put the zwieola into individual dishes, and pour over it a thin peanut cream with a little sugar and a very little salt added. The cream should be hot to make it nice. Serve as a breakfast dish. ...
-Rice Cakes
Take 1 cup of cold cooked rice, 1/2 cup of nut milk, 1 egg, salt to taste. Beat the rice, milk, and yolk of the egg until they bubble, then fold in the stiffly-beaten whites, and bake immediately in c...
-Popovers
Take 2 cups of nut milk, 2 cups of whole-wheat flour, 1 teaspoonful of salt, and the yolks of 2 eggs. Beat the yolks until they are thick; stir the flour into the milk, and then add the beaten yolks o...
-Pancakes
Take 1/2 cup of corn-meal, 1 1/2 cups of white flour, 2 cups of nut milk, salt to suit the taste, and 4 eggs. Mix the corn-meal and flour, add the salt and water, and beat thoroughly. Separate the egg...
-Fruit
Fruits consist chiefly of water, and for this reason are scarcely ever looked upon as nutrients. They contain a small amount of nitrogenous elements and agreeable acids, which are very useful in keepi...
-Apples
The apple is the fleshy fruit of a tree belonging to the rose family (Rosaceae). The calyx of the flower becomes thick, pulpy, and edible at maturity, enclosing the seed-pod with seeds. The apple has...
-Bananas
The banana is the fruit of a large, herbaceous plant, closely related to the plantain, and cultivated in most tropical countries for its fruit, which grows in clusters of more than a hundred finger-sh...
-Cherries
The cherry is the fruit of a small tree or shrub belonging to the genus Prunus. The fruit is smooth and bloomless, enclosing a small, smooth seed. There are many varieties of the cherry, both of the w...
-Cranberries
The cranberry is the fruit of a small, slender vine growing in marshy places. The fruit is round or oblong and of a bright red color. The flesh is quite hard and firm, and is covered with a thick, wax...
-Currants
This fruit is indigenous to America, Europe, and Asia. It probably derives its name from Corinth, where it was grown extensively. It is a small, round fruit, red, white, and sometimes black, growing i...
-Dates
The date is the fruit of the date-palm; the name is derived from dactyl, so named from its shape. Botanically, it is called Phaenix dactylifera, and it grows plentifully in the dry regions of Asia and...
-Figs
The fig is the fruit of a tree botanically called Ficus Carica. The trees are small, with large, green leaves, and pear-shaped fruit, which in color varies from a dark purple to a yellowish tinge. Whe...
-Grapes
The grape is the fruit of a vine belonging to the genus Vitis, of the Vine family Vitaceae. It has long tendrils that aid it in climbing trellises; its leaves are large and glossy green. The flowers a...
-Gooseberries
The gooseberry is the fruit of a shrub belonging to the same genus as the currant. The bush is a thorny shrub, and in its wild state yields a prickly berry; but the fruit of the cultivated sort is smo...
-Huckleberries
The huckleberry is the fruit of a small bush or shrub belonging to the Heath family (Ericaceae). They are also called whortleberries and blueberries. There are several species, the two principal ones ...
-Lemons
The lemon is the fruit of a tropical or subtropical tree, belonging to the Orange family (Aurantiaceae). It is oblong in shape, with a protruding point at each end. The fruit is from two to four inche...
-Limes
The lime is the fruit of a tree belonging to the same family as the lemon, and very much resembling it excepting it is much smaller. In composition it is very much like the lemon, and can be used in t...
-Melons
The melon is not really a fruit, but in composition is as nearly allied to fruit as to vegetables. It belongs to the Gourd family, and consists principally of water, having no nutriment except a litt...
-Oranges
The orange is the fruit of a tree very closely allied to the lemon and lime, but having a much larger and sweeter fruit. In nutritive value it is very low, only having six to eight per cent. of sugar;...
-Pineapples
The pineapple is the fruit of a tropical plant indigenous to South America. The plant only grows a few inches high, and is surmounted by a densely packed flower pike, which becomes the fruit. The leav...
-Peaches
The peach is the fruit of a tree belonging to the Priunus family. It opens its blossoms, which are rose-colored, early in the spring before the leaves appear. The trees grow from eight to twenty feet ...
-Plums
The plum belongs to the same family as the peach, and resembles it in growth and leaves. The fruit is very similar in composition, but it has a smooth skin. The plum tree is more hardy than the peach,...
-Prunes
The prune is only a sweet variety of the plum, which has been dried. When thoroughly cooked, they are very nice, and are sometimes eaten for a laxative. ...
-Pears
The pear is the fruit of a tree called Pyrus communis, and belongs to the Rose family {Rosacea). The fruit is quite large and bell-shaped, being the largest at the blow end, and tapering toward the st...
-Quinces
The quince is the fruit of a shrub, or small tree, belonging to the Rose family (Rosaceae). The fruit is from two and one-half to three inches in diameter; it is quite hard, acid, pleasant flavored, a...
-Raspberries
The raspberry is the fruit of a trailing bush that very closely resembles the blackberry. There are many varieties of the raspberry; among them are the red, the black, and the white. They are a thimbl...
-Strawberries
The strawberry is the fruit of a low-growing vine belonging to the Rose family (Rosaceae). It is the most widely distributed of all the fruit-bearing plants, growing in very cold as well as in tropica...
-Pie-Plant
Pie-plant is not a fruit, but is sometimes used in the place of it in sauce and pie. It contains water, woody matter or cellulose, and oxalic acid; and as the latter is very poisonous, pie-plant shoul...
-Tomatoes
Although it is usually classed with vegetables, it more closely resembles fruit. It contains malic acid and a very little oxalic acid, but not enough to be injurious. It also contains one and six-tent...
-Fresh Fruit
IN serving fresh fruit, it should always be that which is perfectly ripe and sound, and should be thoroughly washed and wiped dry. Fruit with decayed spots upon it, is diseased, and should not be eate...
-Fresh Fruit. Continued
Peaches Peaches make a very inviting dish, if, after the fruit has been wiped with a damp cloth, it is stacked upon a fruit plate, or served with other fresh fruits, as pears, plums, and apples. As a...
-To Can Fruit
Fruit canning is a very simple process, but if it is perfectly successful, certain principles must be followed : - 1. All germs' must be killed and excluded. 2. Only good, sound fruit should be used....
-To Can Fruit. Part 2
Strawberries The first thing of importance in canning strawberries is to select good, sound fruit. Those that have been water-soaked by a heavy rain are not good for canning, as they will almost alwa...
-To Can Fruit. Part 3
Cherries Select good, plump fruit, and that which is not wormy. Wash well. Cherries can be pitted with a cherry-pitter, but they look much nicer if pitted by hand, as the machine lacerates them somew...
-To Can Fruit. Part 4
Plums The best plums for canning, in most sections of the country, are the Damask, Green Gage, Lombard Peach plum, and Golden Drop. The Golden Drop plums are no more acid, when canned, than a peach; ...
-Cooked Fruit
Baked Apples Select good, tart apples, wash well, and remove the core by inserting a new clothes-pin into the blow end of the apple, pressing the ends of the pin together while inserting, but letting...
-Cooked Fruit. Continued
Baked Quinces Wash some ripe quinces, and bake until soft. When cold, strip off the skins, and roll them in powdered sugar. Serve cold, with or without nut cream. Baked Apple Sauce Pare, quarter,...
-Wines
Grape Wine Select good, ripe fruit, exercising care not to take any which is overripe. Unripe fruit is more acid, and does not have the delicate flavors found in the ripe fruit; and overripe fruit co...
-Wines. Continued
Raspberry Wine Select good, plump, ripe raspberries, look over, and wash, letting them drain until quite dry; then mash in an earthen or granite dish, and pour into a jelly-bag or two thicknesses of ...
-Jellies
All fruit juices do not contain sufficient pectose to form a jelly, and only a few kinds of fruit will make jelly without sugar. Those that are the easiest to jelly, are the Siberian crab-apple, Snow ...
-Jellies. Part 2
Currant Jelly Take the juice from the currant as directed in recipe for Currant Wine. Put into a granite stew-pan, and let it boil until one half of the quantity has evaporated; then add enough sugar...
-Jellies. Part 3
Grape Jelly This is best made just before it is wanted for use. Take some of the canned grape wine (see recipe), and add sugar to taste. Pour into a glass dish, or more than one dish if there should ...
-Jellies. Part 4
Gooseberry Jelly Take the gooseberry just before it begins to ripen. Cook in a small quantity of water, and pour into a jelly-bag, draining overnight or for several hours. Pour the juice into a stew-...
-Orange Baskets
A very unique way of serving jelly is in baskets made from oranges. Select seven symmetrical oranges of an equal size, choosing those having a fresh, bright golden rind. Wash thoroughly and wipe dry. ...
-Baked Apples And Butter
Select good, tart apples, remove the core, and fill the cavity with a mixture of peanut butter and sugar, about half and half, and a little sprinkling of sassafras. Mix the ingredients well before fil...
-Legumes
The Legume family consists of peas, beans, lentils, and like foods. The peanut may be classed with this family also, although it is commonly classed with nuts. The peanut resembles nuts on account of ...
-Beans
Stewed Beans Select small, white, navy-beans, as they are easier to cook, and their skin is thin, tender, and easily masticated. Let them soak overnight, and in the morning put them to cook in cold w...
-Peas
Sifted Peas Soak Scotch peas overnight; in the morning look over, discarding all the poor ones, wash, and boil in soft water. Let them boil quite hard for the first half-hour, as that will remove th...
-Lentils
Sifted Lentils Look over and wash the lentils well and put to soak in cold water for at least two hours, longer if possible. Then cook slowly until perfectly tender, and rub through a colander. Seaso...
-Peanuts
Boiled Peanuts First blanch the peanuts, which can be done by heating in the peanut roaster or in the oven until they are quite hot, but not browned in the least. Let them cool in a dry place, and wh...
-Vegetables
The vegetables belong to that class of foods of which the Lord spoke when he said to Adam, Thou shalt eat the herb of the field. Gen. 3:18. They consist of the leaves, stalks, and tubers, as well as...
-Potatoes
The potato is the tuber of a plant that is a native of the Andes from Chile to as far north as New Mexico. It was scarcely known until the seventeenth century, but since that time has been widely cult...
-Potatoes. Continued
Potato Puffs Take 1 cup of mashed potatoes, 1 egg, 1/2 cup of nut cream, and salt to taste. Beat the egg light without separating. and add to the mashed potatoes with the cream and salt. Beat until q...
-Parsnips
Fried Parsnips When cleaned, halve the parsnips, and boil until tender in salted water, and then fry in nutcoa or peanut oil. They are as nice as those fried in butter, but we do not recommend fried ...
-Salsify, Or Vegetable Oysters
In nutritive value they are the same as carrots or parsnips. In flavor they resemble the oyster, and are excellent for making soups. Salsify With Egg Sauce Select fresh vegetable oysters, and le...
-Turnips And Rutabagas
The nutritive value of the turnip is very low, being only about five per cent. The rutabaga is more nutritious, and both are quite easy of digestion if thoroughly cooked. Be sure and give plenty of ti...
-Asparagus
Asparagus With Gravy Cut the asparagus as far as tender into half-inch pieces, and cook until tender in boiling, salted water. Take out the asparagus in a dish, and have ready some nice pieces of zwi...
-Eggplant
Baked Eggplant No 1 Cut in slices one third of an inch thick without removing the skins. Soak in cold, salted water for an hour or more, drain, and dip each slice in white flour, then in a beaten egg...
-Beets
Beets contain considerable sugar. The variety known as sugar beet is cultivated in many countries for the manufacture of sugar. This industry is being introduced into this country. The beet is more ...
-Spinach On Toast
Take 6 slices of bread of the same size and thickness, and cut a diamond out of each slice that is five inches the longer way from point to point, and three inches across from one oblique angle to the...
-Dandelion Greens
Take 1 peck of fresh dandelions, look over and wash well, and put on the stove in plenty of cold water. When they have boiled for a few minutes, drain off the water, and add more. If they are not real...
-Radishes
Radishes do not contain very much nutriment, being about the same in composition as the turnip, but their bright color adds to the beauty of the table, and if well masticated they can be digested by a...
-Cabbage
Cabbage is very low in nutritive value, and not very easy of digestion. It consists principally of water. The winter cabbage contains eighty per cent. water, four per cent. albuminous elements, one pe...
-Baked Cauliflower
Trim off the leaves of a firm head of cauliflower, and let stand in salted water one hour. If there are any insects, they will crawl out. Cook in slightly salted water until tender, then drain careful...
-Onions
The principal use to which onions are generally put is to season soups, gravies, and other foods. They contain a volatile oil that is not digestible, but this evaporates with the cooking. For this rea...
-Lettuce
This vegetable, though not very nutritious, is digestible unless the dressing with which it is served is unwholesome. The practise of serving lettuce with vinegar is not to be countenanced by those wh...
-Celery
Celery With Gravy Take very brittle celery, wash well, cut in one-half finger lengths, and cook until very tender. Then drain, saving the water in which it was cooked, and adding enough to it to make...
-Squash
Summer Squash Summer squash is very low in nutritive value, but is easily digested, and if properly cooked is palatable, and helps to make a variety. The crook-neck are the nicest flavored, but the h...
-Cucumbers
The cucumber is very low in nutritive value, having only four per cent. of nutrition. It is not, however, objectionable unless served with vinegar, pepper, and other condiments. It is more easily dige...
-Tomato Recipes
The tomato consists principally of water, and hence is very low in nutritive value. As late as the early part of this century, the tomato was regarded as poisonous, and some now have an idea that they...
-Green Corn
Green corn does not contain the nutriment that the mature grain does, and is therefore more commonly classed with the vegetables. The same may be said of green peas and beans. They make many palatable...
-Corn
Stewed Corn Select tender, fresh corn, and remove all husks and silks. With a sharp knife cut the center of each row of kernels, and with the back of the knife press out the kernels, leaving the hull...
-String-Beans
String well, break into inch lengths, wash thoroughly, and cook in boiling water until tender (this usually takes about two hours). Salt the water about ten minutes before they are done, then drain th...
-Shelled Beans
The lima beans are considered the best, but other varieties are good. Cook in boiling, salted water until they are very tender. Season with nut milk and serve hot. To Warm Up Shelled Beans Pour ...
-Dumplings
Plain Dumplings Take 1/2 cup of walnut meal, 1/2 cup of grated zwieback, salt to taste, 1/2 cup of flour, and 1/4 cup of cold water. Mix well; form into dumplings as large as a marble. Cook in the so...
-Bouillons
Bouillon No. 1, Or Nut Broth Take some blanched almonds and roast them in the oven until quite brown, but do not burn. Grind them through the nut-butter mill; then add some cold water about 1 pint fo...
-Almond Soup
Almond Soup No. 1 Take 1 pound of almond meal or butter, 1 teaspoonful of sugar, one tablespoonful of corn-starch, 1 quart of hot water, and a pinch of salt. First blanch, dry, and grind the almonds ...
-Chestnut Soup
Chestnut Soup No. 1 Shell and blanch 1 pound of chestnuts. To blanch, pour boiling water over them, and let stand two minutes, then turn off the water, and the skins will rub off. Put into 1 quart of...
-Onion Soup
Onion Soup No. 1 Cook the onions as directed for stewed onions. (See index,) When very tender, put through a vegetable press or colander to make them smooth. Salt to taste, and flavor with almond or ...
-Soups
Soups are not so nutritious, of course, as more solid foods, as they contain so much water; but they are useful at the beginning of the meal, to start the flow of the digestive fluids. One is not so a...
-Soups. Part 2
Bean Soup Take 2 cups of left-over beans and two cups of cold mashed potatoes. Put in a kettle with a pint of water, and let boil until warmed through. Put through a colander and season with salt and...
-Soups. Part 3
Creme De Potiron Take 3 pounds of pumpkin, 2 quarts of nut milk, 4 table-spoonfuls of almond meal, 1 teaspoonful of sugar. Cut the pumpkin into slices and boil until tender. Sift through the colander...
-Soups. Part 4
Lentil Soup Cook until tender and rub through a colander. To 1 pint of sifted lentils add 1 tablespoonful of nut butter, 1 grated onion, and salt to taste. Add sufficient water to make of the right c...
-Soups. Part 5
Raw Peanut Milk Soup Take 1 pint of milk that has been extracted from raw peanuts, or 1 tablespoonful of raw butter in 1 quart of water, and place in the inner cup of the double boiler. When boiling,...
-Soups. Part 6
Tomato Soup No. 2 Select 6 ripe but sound tomatoes which have a good thick meat. Cut in small pieces, and put them in a stew-pan with 1 pint of rich nut milk, 1 teaspoonful of grated onion, and a spr...
-Gravies For Vegetables And Toasts
To Brown Flour Spread flour on a pie-tin about one fourth of an inch thick, and place in a very hot oven. When it begins to color, stir constantly until browned clear through, but not burned. Put it ...
-Gravies For Vegetables And Toasts. Continued
Onion Gravy Boil 4 or 5 good-sized white onions until tender. Rub through a colander, add 1 cup of nut cream made by dissolving 1 level tablespoonful of butter in 1 cup of water, or use raw peanut mi...
-Pies
Almond Meal Pie Crust One cup of white flour, 2/3 cup of almond meal, 1/2 cup of cold water, and a pinch of salt. Mix the flour and almond meal thoroughly together, add water and salt, and knead but ...
-Pies. Part 2
Cocoanut Cream Pie Crust If too thick, add a small quantity of water to the cream, making, perhaps, twice as much as before thinning. Add a pinch of salt, if desired, and enough flour to roll out wel...
-Pies. Part 3
Cranberry Pie Line a pie-tin with a good paste. Take 1 quart of cranberries, and put them on the stove in a granite stew basin with a little water. Cook until they pop open, then put through a sieve,...
-Pies. Part 4
Fresh Fruit Pie Hull and wash well 1 quart of fresh ripe strawberries, put them in a pie-tin which has been lined with a crust made of nutcoa or peanut meal. Sprinkle over the top 2 level tablespoonf...
-Pies. Part 5
Peach Pie Take fresh, ripe peaches, cut in halves, and remove the pits. Line a pic tin with a nut crust, and place the fruit in it with the inside of the peach up. One layer is sufficient. Pour over...
-Pies. Part 6
Summer Squash Pie Cook a summer squash until tender, then put through a sieve or colander, add sugar, salt, vanilla, and a little cornstarch to thicken it. Pour into a pie-tin lined with nice, tender...
-Custard
Custard No. 1 Take 2 cups of raw-peanut milk, 1/2 cup of sugar. Cook three fourths of an hour in a double boiler. Have ready 2 well-beaten eggs. Pour upon them the cooked milk, beating very rapidly. ...
-Cocoanut Pudding
Cocoanut Pudding No. 1 Take the milk of the cocoanut and enough water to make 1 1/2 quarts. Grind the cocoanut through the nut mill. Add 2 tablespoonfuls of the ground cocoanut to the water, and simm...
-Tapioca Pudding
Tapioca Pudding No. 1 Soak 1/2 cup of tapioca in 1 cup of cold water for two hours, then add 1 cup more of water and boil until the tapioca melts. When done, it should be quite thick. Add a well-beat...
-Puddings
Puddings, if made with dairy milk and sugar combined, are apt to ferment in weak stomachs. They are much better prepared without dairy milk. Prune Pudding Look over 1 pound of prunes, discarding ...
-Puddings. Part 2
Steamed Apple Pudding Take 2 cups of grated bread, 1/2 cup seeded raisins, 1 cup of chopped apples, 1/4 cup of sugar, and 3 eggs. Mix the bread-crumbs, raisins, apples, and sugar thoroughly together...
-Puddings. Part 3
Escalloped Apples Oil a pudding dish, and put a layer of peeled, sliced apples in the bottom. Sprinkle with sugar and flour and a very little nut meal. Fill the dish in this manner, and bake one hour...
-Sauces For Puddings
Almond Cream Sauce Take 1 cup of almond cream, 1/2 cup of powdered sugar. Cream together, and just before serving, add vanilla, and 2 tablespoonfuls of white currant juice or white grape juice, or if...
-Sauces For Puddings. Continued
Fruit Juice Sauce Take 1/2 cup of nut butter, 1 cup of sugar, 1 tablespoonful of corn-starch, 1/2 cup of cold water, and 1/2 cup of fruit juice. Cream the butter and sugar together, and stir in the c...
-Cake Fillings
Almond Filling Blanch 1/2 pound of almonds by putting on boiling water and leaving them for two or three minutes; then pour off the water, and rub off the skins. Place in a warm oven to dry, and when...
-Cocoanut Cakes
Cocoanut Cake No .1 Take 5 eggs, 1 cup of almond meal, 1 cup of sugar, salt to taste, 1 tablespoonful of water, 1 cup of granular white flour (Pillsbury's Best). Beat the yolks and whites separately....
-Chestnut Cakes
Chestnut Cake Take 2 cups of chestnut flour, 5 eggs, 1 scant cup of sugar, 2 tablespoonfuls of water, and a pinch of salt. To make the chestnut flour, first dry the nuts before shelling, or toast the...
-Cakes
Cakes and pies which are filled with animal fats, irritating spices, and are raised with baking-powder or soda, are certainly very unwholesome; to use them in our bill of fare could work nothing but i...
-Cakes. Part 2
Almond Cake Take 1/2 pound of powdered sugar, 1/2 pound of seedless raisins, 4 eggs, 1/4 pound of rice flour, 6 ounces of flour, 1 cup of almond meal. Mix meal and sifted sugar together, beat the yol...
-Cakes. Part 3
Gold Cake Take 1/2 pound of sugar, 3/4 cup of fine almond meal, the yolks of 8 eggs, 1 pound of flour, juice of 1 lemon, and 1/2 teaspoonful of vanilla or rose-water. Beat the yolks one-half hour, ad...
-Cakes. Part 4
Marble Cake Make the light part of the cake like snow cake, only add 1 cup of almond meal. Make the dark part by beating the 9 yolks of the eggs to a stiff froth. Add the juice of 1 lemon while beati...
-Cakes. Part 5
Nut Cake Take 5 eggs, 1 cup of fine, granulated sugar, 3/4 cup of gluten No. 3 or 1 cup of granular white flour, 1 cup of coarsely ground nuts (walnuts, hickory-nuts, pecans, hazelnuts, or almonds, o...
-Cakes. Part 6
Rice Cake Take 10 ounces of ground rice, 3 ounces of white flour, 8 ounces of powdered sugar, sifted, 8 eggs, and 1 teaspoonful of rose-water. Sift the flour, sugar, and rice together into the well-b...
-Cakes. Part 7
Snow Cake Have all material and dishes ready before beginning the cake, and have the oven of the right temperature. Take the whites of 9 fresh, cold eggs and beat a few minutes, then add a pinch of s...
-Cakes. Part 8
Cocoanut Cream Cake Take 4 eggs, 1 cup of white flour, 1 cup of white granulated sugar, 1/2 cup of cocoanut cream, juice of 1 small lemon, and a pinch of salt. Put the salt and one half of the lemon-...
-Cakes. Part 9
Date Cookies Take 2 cups of nut butter, 3 cups of stoned dates, and enough flour to roll out well. Grind the dates through the mill or chop them very fine, and mix well with the nut butter, then add ...
-Icing
Allow 10 teaspoonfuls of powdered sugar and 1/2 tea-spoonful of lemon-juice to the white of 1 egg. Beat the egg until you can invert a spoonful of it without its falling, then beat in the sugar, a spo...
-Icing. Continued
Plain Icing For Cake Sift 4 ounces of pulverized sugar, beat the white of 1 egg stiff, then gradually beat in the sugar, adding a little at a time until it forms a thick and smooth paste; when it is ...
-Peanut And Cereal Coffee
Take 1 cup of coarsely ground peanuts, 2 cups of wheat bran, 1/2 cup of corn-meal, 1/3 cup of malt dissolved in 1/2 cup of boiling water. Mix all together, and bake in the oven to a nice brown. C...
-Drinks
The system requires from three to four quarts of water each day, but this should be taken either one hour before meals or three hours after eating. Drinking at meal-time dilutes the gastric juice of t...
-Coffee
Chufa Coffee Take some good chufas, or earth almonds, wash them well, and bake in the oven or roast in a peanut roaster until quite brown, but not burned. Grind in a coffee-mill, but not very fine, t...
-Nutmeatose Salad
Nutmeatose Salad No. 1 To each half pound of nutmeatose, cut in small slices, add a dressing made of 1/2 cup of nut cream, 1/2 cup of slightly diluted lemon-juice, 1 egg, 1 teaspoonful of sugar, and ...
-Salads
Lettuce Salad Strain 1 pint of tomatoes, and put on stove to heat. When boiling, take a little of the hot juice and 1 tablespoonful of nut butter, and work together unti l creamy. Then stir into the...
-Tomato Toast
Tomato Toast No. 1 Moisten slices of well-toasted bread in hot water, and serve with the following dressing: Select good, ripe tomatoes, pour over them boiling water, let stand a minute or two, then ...
-Egg Toasts
Egg Toast No. 1 Pour boiling water into a spider or shallow dish, and place it on the stove where it will keep just below the boiling-point. Break in a saucer as many eggs as there are pieces of toas...
-Toasts
Toasts are foods well calculated for breakfast, as they can be made in a short time, and the material prepared the day before. Toasted bread or zwieback should be made of good light bread, white, gra...
-Toasts. Part 2
Dried Apple Toast Wash the dried apples well, and soak in lukewarm water for two hours, then stew slowly until very tender, and beat smooth or put through a colander. Sweeten to taste, and season wit...
-Toasts. Part 3
Peach Toast Take canned peaches, or fresh ones, and stew them. Put through a sieve or colander, sweeten to taste, reheat, thicken with a little white flour; let boil a few minutes, and serve on moist...
-Gruels
Corn-Meal Gruel Take 1 quart of water, 2 tablespoonfuls of corn-meal, 1 tablespoonful of white flour, and a little salt and nut cream. Rub the corn-meal and flour smooth in a little cold water, and p...
-Fruit Recipes
Fruits are the most simple and easily digested of all foods; they contain a great deal of water, and are therefore very useful as food in fever cases. They also contain acids that are antiseptic in na...
-Miscellaneous Recipes
Chestnuts With Raisins Remove the chestnuts from the shells, and put on the stove in hot water, allowing them to boil until the skins are loose enough to rub off, which will be in about five minutes;...
-Egg-Nog
Egg-Nog No. 1 Take 1/2 tumbler of cocoanut cream, add to it 1 teaspoon-ful of granulated sugar, the yolk of 1 egg, and beat with a fork until creamy. Beat the whites of an egg and a pinch of salt to ...
-Ice-Creams
Ice-Cream No. 1 Take 1 quart of nut cream, 1 cup of sugar, 3 eggs, and 2 teaspoonfuls of vanilla. Beat the whites and yolks of the eggs separately, adding the sugar and yolks; then add the vanilla, t...
-Water Ices
Orange Ice Take 2 quarts of water, 1 quart of orange juice, and 2 pounds of sugar. Melt the sugar in the water, letting it boil for a few moments, and removing the scum, if any rises. Then add the ju...
-Sherbets
Sherbets consist of the frozen juices of fruits without the addition of water. Usually a combination of fruit juices is employed. Sherbet No. 1 Take 2 quarts of peach pulp, 1 quart of orange jui...
-To Blanch Nuts
Peanuts Roasted peanuts are blanched quite easily. The best and quickest method is with a blanching machine made for that purpose. But they can be blanched quite rapidly by rubbing them upon a sieve ...
-To Salt Nuts
Peanuts No. 1 Take some peanuts that have been blanched and looked over, pour cold water over them, and drain. Then. place on granite pie-tins, sprinkle generously with fine table salt, and bake in a...
-Confectionery
Taffy Take 3 cups of very light brown sugar and 1 cup of water. Put into a dish which may be readily handled. A long-handled, granite stew-pan is most convenient. Stir until sugar is dissolved; no lo...
-Confectionery. Continued
Chocolate Drops Shave a sufficient quantity of chocolate to make 1 cup, put in a basin, and set in a warm place until the chocolate melts. Add 1 teaspoonful of vanilla and 1 teaspoonful of water, mix...
-Menus
A Mistake that is very common among people, especially those who are well-to-do, is having too great a variety at one meal. It would be better to eat only three or four different kinds of foods at ea...
-Menus For Those Who Cannot Eat Fruit
Breakfast No. 1 Grains : cracked wheat. Toast : peanut gravy. Breads : graham rolls, whole-wheat gems, raised bread. Vegetables : potato hash, macaroni with egg sauce. Nut Foods : nut butter, mal...
-Menus For Those Who Cannot Eat Vegetables
Breakfast No. J Grains : corn meal. Toast : strawberry. Breads : rolls, graham gems, crisps. Nut Foods : sliced nutmeato, nut butter. Fruits : stewed (peach); fresh (pears and apples). Drinks : h...
-Thanksgiving Dinner
The Thanksgiving dinner has been a great puzzler to the vegetarian housewife. How can we ever celebrate Thanksgiving without a turkey? has been a question which it has been hard to solve. I propose ...
-Christmas Dinner
Ornament the table with a dish of ferns and carnations. The stems should be long and graceful, and carelessly arranged in an old-fashioned china bowl, or a glass dish without feet or stem. Or a pretty...
-Composition Of Foods
The ordinary food material, such as breads, grains, eggs, vegetables, fruit, etc., consists of, first, the refuse, such as the shells of eggs and bran of wheat; and second, the edible portion, as the ...
-Ways In Which Materials Are Used In The Body
Proteins form tissue (muscle, tendon, etc.), and serve as fuel. Fats form fatty tissue (not muscle, etc.), and serve as fuel. Carbohydrates are transformed into fat, and serve as fuel. Alcohol does...
-Dietetic Tables. Composition Of American Food Products
Nutrients. Food Material. Water. Per cent. Protein. Per cent. Fats. Per cent. Carbohydrates. Per cent. Per cent. Total nutriment. Per cent. Fuel ...
-Advertising
Our Favorite Family Nut Grinding Mill. Makes Fine Nut Butter We Manufacture Nut Grinders . . . And . . . Blanchers . . . Also . . . Peanut Roasters To Operate By Hand and Power. The Grinde...









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