The scale which follows is used under the Chicago Produce Reporter System:

Fancy Potatoes shall be known as: One variety true to name, ripe, sound, smooth, clean, bright, free from disease, scab and second growth, uniform run of medium to large size, correct shape for the variety quoted, with none but would run over a one and three fourths inch screen, and not over 5 per cent. that would run through a two-inch screen for round varieties. For long varieties there may be 20 per cent. that would run through a two-inch screen.

Choice Potatoes shall be known as: One variety with not over 10 per cent. mixture, but all of one color, ripe, sound, not over 5 per cent. scabby, diseased and second growth, fairly clean, good color, medium to fair size and shape for variety quoted, with none but would run over a one and one half inch screen, and not over 10 per cent. that would run through a one and three fourths inch screen for round varieties. For long varieties there may be 20 per cent. that would run through a one and three fourths inch screen.

Good Potatoes shall be the same as Choice, only there may be a 30 per cent. mixture of same color, or 10 per cent. mixture of any color and variety, fairly well matured, according to season shipped, and not over 15 per cent. scabby, diseased and rough, fair to dark color, fair size, with none but would run over a one-inch screen, and not over 15 per cent. that would run through a one and one fourth inch screen, with not over 2 per cent. unsound.

Field Run Potatoes should be practically sound, but unassorted. Dockage, when loading potatoes. In cases where the percentage of dirt, small, inferior, green, etc., potatoes exceeds the allowance in above grades, inspectors may make said stock equal to the grade quoted, or purchased, by such dockage as they consider equitable.

The section from which the potatoes are quoted, and the general quality of that season's crop in that section, should always be considered in connection with grades; not as really changing above definitions, but in close cases inspectors should favor the shipper if that season's general crop is not up to the average quality, or favor the receiver if as good or better than usual."