For generations past the world has produced an abundance of fruit and vegetable food to feed all of its millions of workers. The fact that they have not all been sufficiently fed is due to our unscientific and inefficient method of distributing the food after it has been produced. It has been a common thing-so common, in fact, that it is mostly the normal condition-for food to be left by the thousands of bushels in the country, where those who had produced it could not dispose of it at a price sufficient to pay for the handling of it, while in the cities the poorer classes, for want of food, went undernourished, if they did not actually starve.

Fig. 54 - A large capacity canner, suitable for club or commercial use. Firebox and smoke stack, with large open vat for canning, in one.

Fig. 54 - A large capacity canner, suitable for club or commercial use. Firebox and smoke stack, with large open vat for canning, in one.

Fig. 55 - A good type of drier for use on the stove; fitted with drying trays inside.

Fig. 55 - A good type of drier for use on the stove; fitted with drying trays inside.

While individuals have been blamed for this condition, it has been not they, but our general system of food distribution, that has been at fault.

These conditions are gradually being changed, not by the arrest and fining of profiteering individuals, but by more intelligent and purposeful organization on the part of both producers and consumers. The newer market methods-which keep the consuming public informed through newspaper notices and otherwise, of the products which are plentiful or in over supply, and at what prices they ought to sell-have proved to be a tremendous stimulation to canning and drying. This movement has been the result of cooperation on the part of the producers.

There are hopeful indications in many directions that the community canning and drying idea-cooperation by the consumers-will spread with equal rapidity. It seems likely that the very near future will see in existence community canning and drying plants on a scale large enough to be thoroughly economi cal in operation, and making possible cooperative buying on a large scale, and the saving of all home-grown products. This will be another tremendous step in the direction of the practical common sense conservation of food.

In the meantime, it is up to every house-holder in the country, both for her personal advantage and as a good citizen, to adopt, either in her own kitchen or as a member of some organization, the motto:

"SAVE IT FOR WINTER!"