What range of variety can we have in the garden which is grown for storing in the cellar and on the pantry shelves for winter?

With the old methods which were used almost exclusively until within the last few years, the number of vegetables and fruits which could be conveniently put up with any degree of certainty that they would not "spoil" was quite limited.

With the newer methods, however, suggested in the previous chapter and described in detail in those to follow, and by using all of the methods of food saving outlined, it is possible without any elaborate equipment or expert training in the work, to save for winter almost the complete range of vegetables and fruits which we enjoy from the summer garden.

Fig. 1 - With modern methods the number of vegetables and fruits which may be saved for winter includes almost the entire list.

Fig. 1 - With modern methods the number of vegetables and fruits which may be saved for winter includes almost the entire list. The winter supply of canned and dehydrated products above is representative of what can be done in any well ordered kitchen.

There are, of course, many conditions which affect the success of the food saving enterprise in any particular case. Some vegetables may be kept very easily and others are very difficult to keep; for this and for other reasons no general rules for either canning, drying or storing will apply. The first thing which any one who is beginning the practice of food saving should thoroughly understand is that directions must be followed carefully.

Another factor affecting success is the condition of the product to be saved. The old rule of procedure that, "we eat what we can and what we can't we can"-or as the Englishman repeated it, "we eat what we can and what we can't we tin"-cannot be counted upon if one wishes either satisfactory quality in the product put up or full success in keeping the things that are put up. In this chapter are mentioned most of the fruits and vegetables which ordinarily can be satisfactorily kept for winter.