(1) Prepare the product for canning by cleaning, skinning, pitting, cutting or slicing into suitable size, etc.

(2) Bleach in steam or hot water for the required number of minutes.

(3) Cold-dip it for a moment, remove, and drain.

(4) Pack the product immediately into the containers to be used; these should be freshly sterilized and still hot. A convenient way of keeping glass jars ready for use, is to place them upside-down in a shallow pan of hot water, after they have been sterilized. This prevents the entrance of dust and keeps them warm without the trouble of having them completely immersed in hot water.

(5) Hot syrup or brine is then poured over the product, filling the containers full to the top. (Plain water is also used for this purpose.)

(6) The tops are then put in place. If cans are being used, they are sealed; if glass jars, the covers are fastened only tight enough to hold them securely in place, but not tight enough to prevent the escape of steam.

(7) The containers are then placed in a vessel for processing for the length of time required for the product being put up, and the type of process being used-hot-water bath, pressure cooker or steam cooker.

(8) Immediately upon being removed from processing, jars must be sealed tight. Test jars by placing them upside-down on a dry surface to cool. Watch carefully for leaks, and, if they occur, tighten the covers until the seal seems perfect. If leakage is discovered after a considerable time, it will be better to heat again to the sterilizing point before closing the covers.

(9) Cool jars by allowing them to stand; cool cans by immersing in cold water.

(10) Label carefully, showing preferably not only the name of the product but the date on which it was put up; and if it is being done for the first time, details as to the sterilization period used, the amount of sugar, salt or lemon juice used, and other particulars which may be wanted when the work is to be done again.

(11) wrap the glass jars in paper to protect them from light unless they are going to be stored in a perfectly dark place.

(12) Store, if possible, where it is dark, and where the temperature will be as cool as may be obtained without danger of freezing.

Fig. 6 - Placing the product, after it is prepared, but still cold, in the jars. The empty jars are kept clean and hot by being inverted in hot water.

Fig. 6 - Placing the product, after it is prepared, but still cold, in the jars. The empty jars are kept clean and hot by being inverted in hot water.