A permanent pit on any place where a large quantity of vegetables are to be stored, or where there is no other place avilable for storing them, is one of the best investments that can be made. A combination pit and hot-bed frame will cost little more than if it were to be used as a hot-bed alone, and give considerable storage space that is comparatively easy to get at in all but the stormiest kind of weather. The winter supply of vegetables will be well out of the way when use for the hot-bed frame in March or April becomes necessary.

Fig. 27 - Where the soil is well drained, root crops of all sorts may be carried through the winter, in even better condition than in the cellar, by burying them in a pit or in a trench with one or two layers of frozen soil, alternating with a covering of leaves, marsh hay or straw.

Fig. 27 - Where the soil is well drained, root crops of all sorts may be carried through the winter, in even better condition than in the cellar, by burying them in a pit or in a trench with one or two layers of frozen soil, alternating with a covering of leaves, marsh hay or straw. An iron pipe or a wooden flue should be inserted every few feet to carry off the surplus moisture. In extreme cold weather, this may be stopped up with an old piece of bag.

The Temporary Pit:

A temporary pit for storing things or carrying over a surplus for spring use, in addition to what is stored in the cellar, may easily be made. Good drainage is the first requisite. Such a pit may be made either in the ground or, where perfect drainage may not be had, on the surface. Both methods are shown in the accompanying cut.

Fig. 28 - Where a pit or trench alone has to be depended upon, for winter storage, it is a good plan to divide the space so that the various vegetables will be obtainable when it is broken into at one end.

Fig. 28 - Where a pit or trench alone has to be depended upon, for winter storage, it is a good plan to divide the space so that the various vegetables will be obtainable when it is broken into at one end. The cut above shows a cross-section of a trench arranged in this way. It contains cabbage, potatoes, parsnips, and turnips.