In canning there are three preliminary steps which should be attended to before the actual work is begun. First, have the product fresh, cleaned and sorted as to sizes and degrees of ripeness. Second, provide a suitable place in which to do the work, a table of ample size, plenty of fresh water, suitable cooking apparatus with control of heat and so forth. (For further details of equipment see Chapter 8.) Third, sterilize all kettles, pans, knives, dippers, containers and other utensils which will be used in preparing the fruit and putting it up after it is prepared.

Fig. 4 - Before processing, the tops of the jars are put in place, but not made tight.

Fig. 4 - Before processing, the tops of the jars are put in place, but not made tight.

Fig. 5 - The finished product is wrapped in paper before being stored away, to prevent its being bleached out by the light.

Fig. 5 - The finished product is wrapped in paper before being stored away, to prevent its being bleached out by the light.

Treating The Rubber Rings For Canning

In this connection, it is important to realize that where rubber is used it must be specially treated to avoid giving a disagreeable taste to the product: this often happens without the source of the trouble being recognized when the food is used. To be sure of avoiding danger from this source, all rubbers should be boiled slowly for several hours in an alkaline solution, formed by putting two or three tablespoonfuls of washing soda in a gallon of water. The rubbers should then be thoroughly rinsed and boiled a second time in water to which a little vinegar or lemon-juice has been added to make it slightly sour. This should be followed by a short boiling in plain water. This may seem like a good deal of trouble, but as the work can be done well in advance of the canning it need, as a matter of fact, occupy very little time.