Peaches

After the fruit has been peeled, either by hand or machine or caustic soda solution, and the stones removed, pack the peaches into the clean tins, then fill the tin with a medium syrup to within half an inch from the top. If tins with soldered lids are used, the tops should be carefully wiped with hot water and every trace of syrup re moved, otherwise the solder will not stick. Fit the lid over the opening and apply a little flux to the surface to be soldered; then hold the lid firmly in place with the stick of solder, and with the heated iron run the solder quickly all round the edge of the lid, leaving a small hole in the centre, which is known as the "vent hole." Place the cans in boiling water for 5 minutes, remove from the water, then solder up the vent hole, return to the water, and cook for about 15 minutes for free-stone peaches, and about 20 minutes for cling-stone, according to degree of ripeness and the size of tins, the size being reckoned at 21b. or 31b. Remove and cool quickly by plunging them into cold water. This will improve the colour and flavour of fruit.

The question is often asked whether the tins should be immersed in the water whilst the "vent hole" is open. It is better to do so, as it is not likely that much water, if any, would enter through the small opening.

In using the tins with lever lids, the lids should be pressed in lightly, and after "exhausting" for five minutes, should be knocked in firmly and allowed to cook until finished.

The time for cooking is reckoned when the water in the canner commences to boil after the tins have been immersed.

Nectarines

Treat the same way as peaches, except that they need not be peeled.

Apricots

Select fruit that is perfectly firm, wash, cut in halves, remove the stones, and pack into the tins. Fill up with heavy syrup, and treat the same way as Peaches, but cook only ten minutes.

Pears

After having peeled the pears either by hand or caustic soda solution, drop them at once into cold water which has been made slightly salt or slightly acid with lemon juice, tartaric or citric acid, or vinegar, which will keep the fruit nice and white. Cut in halves, remove the cores, and pack at once into the clean tins. Fill up with syrup to within half an inch of the lid, and treat the same way as peaches, sterilising them for about 20 minutes.

Plums

Select sound and perfectly firm fruit, then prick with a darning needle to prevent the skin from bursting. Pack into the tins, fill with heavy syrup, and follow the same directions as for peaches, cooking from 15 to 20 minutes.

Quinces

Pare, core, and quarter the quinces, or they may be cut into pieces or rings. Drop them at once into cold water made slightly salt or acid (lemon juice, tartaric or citric acid, vinegar, or any other acid may be used), which will prevent them from discolouring, then pack into clean tins and fill up to within half an inch from the top with a medium syrup. Treat the same as Peaches, but allow to cook for 30 to 35 minutes. Remove and cool.

Guavas

Peel thinly and drop at once into salt water or slightly acid water, then pack into clean tins. Fill with a medium syrup to within half an inch from the lid, and treat the same as Peaches, allowing them to cook for 15 to 20 minutes.

Grapes

Select a fleshy grape, such as Hanepot and Barbarossa, and remove the berries from the stalks. Pack into clean tins, and fill to within half an inch of the lid with a medium syrup. Treat the same as Peaches and cook ten minutes.

Apples

Pare, core, and quarter the apples, then treat the same way as Pears, and sterilise about 20 minutes.

Pineapples

Pare the pineapples, carefully remove the eyes, then cut into half-inch slices and remove the core. Pack into clean tins, fill up with a heavy syrup, then treat the same as Peaches, allowing 15 to 20 minutes for cooking.

Soft Fruits, such as Berries of all kinds: Remove the stems, put into a preserving pan, with a very little water and cook gently for a few minutes, then fill into tins and cook for 12 to 20 minutes.