Apple And Grape Jelly

Cook together 4 lb. grapes and 14 sour apples until tender, then drain through a jelly bag, and to each cupful of juice allow one cupful of sugar. Follow the same directions as for Apple Jelly.

If apples are pared, a much lighter jelly may be made, but a great deal of the gelatinising substance will be lost.

Grape Jelly

Pick over the grapes, wash them, and remove the stems. Put into preserving pan, heat to boiling point, mash, and boil 30 minutes. Then proceed as for Apple Jelly.

Guava Jelly

Cut guavas into pieces, put into preserving pan and cover with water. Cook to a pulp, then strain through jelly-bag, and put it back into the preserving pan. Allow three-quarters of a pound of sugar to every pound of fruit, and the strained juice of a lemon, then proceed the same way as for Apple Jelly.

Mango Jelly

Use only green mangoes for making jelly. Cut up the fruit into pieces, cover with water, and boil until tender, then strain. Measure the juice and allow equal measures of sugar, then follow the same directions as for Apple Jelly.

Orange Jelly

Slice up the fruit, and to every pound add three pints of water. Let stand overnight, and the following day boil for two or three hours. Strain through a flannel or felt jelly-bag. Measure the liquid and allow one cup of sugar to every cup of liquid. Follow the same directions as for Apple Jelly.

Parsley Jelly

Take a quantity of fresh parsley, wash, put in a preserving pan, cover with cold water, and boil gently for about 30 minutes. Then strain through well-scalded jelly bag. Measure the juice, and for every pint allow three-fourths of a pound of sugar. Boil the juice for 20 minutes, then add the heated sugar and boil for 10 minutes. Pour into dry, sterilised jars and seal.

Peach Jelly

For peach jelly select peaches not quite ripe enough for eating. Rub off the down with a coarse cloth, cut in pieces, and remove the stones. Cover with water and cook slowly, closely covered, until the fruit is quite soft. Pour into a jelly bag and allow to drip. When all the juice is extracted, measure, and to every two cupfuls of juice, allow one and a half cups of sugar and the strained juice of one lemon, then follow the same directions as for Apple Jelly. Peaches never make a firm jelly that will retain its shape when turned from a mould or glass, but it is delicious for cake fillings, sauces, and puddings.

Pear Jelly

Follow same directions as for Apple Jelly, but allow the strained juice of a lemon to every pint of juice and 1 1/2 cups of sugar.

Plum Jelly

Use underripe acid plums, wash them, and remove the stems. Put into the preserving pan, and to eight pounds of fruit use one pint of water. Cook gently until the plums are boiled to pieces, then strain the juice and proceed the same as for Apple Jelly.

Quince Jelly

Follow recipe for Apple Jelly.

Rhubarb Jelly

Wash and dry the stalks, cut into pieces about one inch long, put into the preserving pan, and allow one pint of water to every four pounds of rhubarb. Boil to a soft pulp, then strain through well-scalded jelly bag. To every pint of this juice allow one pound of sugar, and follow same directions as for Apple Jelly.