Apple Jelly

Method. Core but do not pare the apples, then slice or cut up, and cover well with water. Boil slowly until tender. If apples are very dry a little lemon juice, or any fruit juice on hand from former cunning, can be added after straining. Proceed according to general directions.

Peach And Apple Jelly

Method. As peaches will not make firm jelly if used alone, combine with tart apples. Cook peaches with the stones, and the apples cored but not pared. When putting into bag remove as many of the stones as possible in order to permit fruit to compress; then proceed according to general directions.

Economical Apple Jelly

Method. Any time during the year, if a good many apples are being pared for sauce, pie, or other purposes, a glass or two of fine amber jelly can be made by using the parings. Wash them and cover with water. Boil slowly until soft, then drain through bag, or strain through colander, and marmalade results. Measure equal portions of fruit and sugar, add some sliced lemons or lemon juice, then proceed according to general directions.

Crabapple Jelly

Method. Select the earliest firm apples, either red or yellow; the red apples give a richer color. Place in kettle and see that fruit is entirely covered with water, then boil slowly until tender, strain, and proceed according to general directions.