Red Raspberry And Currant Marmalade

Method. Proceed as directed for gooseberries, but rub fruit through a fine sieve. Otherwise seeds will pass through.

Cherry And Orange Marmalade

Method. Stem the cherries, and after cooking in very little water, rub through a colander. Be careful that all the pulp is freed from the stones. Add the clear pulp of one orange to every two cups of cherry pulp, mix, and bring to the boiling point. Have ready an equal amount of sugar, add half of it, and cook fifteen minutes. Add remainder of sugar and cook until marmalade is clear, becoming stiff when cool.

Orange Marmalade

Method. Follow directions for grapefruit marmalade but substitute juicy oranges and in cooking the skin use only enough water to simmer it.

Wild Plum Marmalade

Method. Remove stems or any blemishes from wild plums, cover well with water, and let simmer until tender. Rub through colander and measure; to each cup of pulp take one cup of sugar. Stir half of the sugar into plums and boil slowly for half an hour; add rest of sugar, and boil until it stiffens like jelly when cooled on a saucer. Put in scalded glasses and seal when cold.

Damson Plum Marmalade

Method. Follow directions given for wild plums. As damson plums are rather dry, use a little more water than is necessary just to cover the fruit.

Peach Marmalade

Proportions. Six cups of peach pulp; four cups of sugar; one teaspoon of ground cinnamon.

Method. Skin and stone the peaches, then place in kettle with enough water just to cover. Cook until tender, rub fruit through colander, measure, and place in kettle with half of the sugar. Cook half an hour, add rest of sugar and cinnamon, and boil until thick and clear. For a piquant marmalade a little fruit sirup or half a cup of sweet cider can be added to the water when cooking the peaches, or the cinnamon can be omitted.

Pear Or Apple Marmalade

Proportions. Six cups of fruit pulp; three lemons; four cups of sugar.

Method. Core but do not pare hard pears or tart apples; cover with water and let simmer until tender. Rub through colander and measure. Add the lemon juice, part of the grated yellow rind of the lemons, and half the required sugar. Cook for half an hour, then add rest of sugar and cook until clear and thick. Equal portions of apples and pears are a good combination, or a few red plums can be added.

Pineapple Marmalade

Proportions. Six cups of fruit pulp; four cups of sugar.

Method. Pare and cut pineapples into small pieces, add one cup of the sugar, and let stand over night in a cool place. Then cook until tender, rub through colander, and add half of the remaining sugar; cook for half an hour, then add rest of sugar and cook until clear and quite stiff. The juice of an orange may be added during the first cooking.

Grape Marmalade

Method. Unripe grapes of any kind can be used. Boil the stemmed grapes in enough water to keep them from burning, rub through colander, then measure. Use equal portions of sugar to fruit, and cook as directed for plum marmalade.

Quince Marmalade

Method. Core and quarter but do not pare quinces, cover with water, and boil until tender. Rub through a colander and use four cups of sugar to five of fruit pulp. Follow directions given for plum marmalade.

Quince And Apple Marmalade

Method. Use one half as many apples as quinces; any good fall apple will answer. Proceed as directed for quince marmalade.

Tomato Marmalade

Proportions. Six cups of unripe tomato pulp; juice of one lemon; four cups of sugar.

Method. Cut green tomatoes into small pieces, let stand in order to draw some juice, then boil slowly. If the tomatoes are too dry, add a very little water. When tender rub through colander and add half of the sugar. Cook half an hour, add rest of sugar and lemon, and cook until clear and of good consistency.