Peas

Select young and tender peas, shell, pack in jars, pour on cold water to overflowing, and proceed according to directions.

String Beans - How To Can Vegetables

Select tender green beans, string them, and cut or break into suitable lengths, pack in jars, fill with cold water to overflowing, then proceed according to directions.

Wax Beans - How To Can Vegetables

Select tender wax or butter beans, remove ends, and cut into neat slanting slices, add salt and cold water as directed for green beans, and proceed according to directions.

Lima Beans - How To Can Vegetables

Lima beans soon lose their flavor after being shelled, so try to get them fresh, and shell just before canning. Discard all hard pods, and proceed as directed for other beans.

Asparagus Tips - How To Can Vegetables

Select perfect, even-sized asparagus,-the white variety is best. Use only the tips, about three inches in length, and can as directed for beans or peas. The lower parts of the asparagus may be used fresh as a vegetable.

Cauliflower - How To Can Vegetables

Select young white cauliflowers, divide the flowers, cutting off any hard stems, then can as directed for other vegetables.

Tomatoes - How To Can Vegetables

Scald and skin firm tomatoes. If the small varieties are used, they may be canned whole, otherwise cut into quarters. Can as directed for other vegetables.

Okra Or Gumbo - How To Can Vegetables

This vegetable is most convenient for soups, stews, and as a vegetable for winter use. Wash the young pods and cut into suitable lengths, then can as directed for other vegetables.

Carrots And Parsnips - How To Can Vegetables

Both of these vegetables keep so well during the winter, as do white and yellow turnips also, that it hardly pays to can them, but if you have a surplus of young vegetables it may be an economy to can them. All vegetables of this kind must be pared, sliced, or cut into blocks, then canned according to directions.

Squash Or Pumpkins - How To Can Vegetables

While these vegetables keep very well if you have a dry, cool cellar, it is often more convenient to can them ready for the winter's pies or tarts. Remove all hard rind and soft fiber, cut into small slices or blocks, and can as directed for other vegetables.

Beets - How To Can Vegetables

Only young tender beets are fit for canning, and they can be put up plain, as are other vegetables, or pickled. As beets bleed and so lose the red color if pared, they must be cooked until tender, without removing skin or ends; then skin, cut up, and place in cans as other vegetables.

Pickled Beets - How To Can Vegetables

Proceed as directed for plain beets. When they are placed in the jars, make a pickle of one third water and two thirds vinegar, and add three tablespoons of sugar and one teaspoon of salt to each quart of beets. If desired, a few small white onions may be added.

Corn - How To Can Vegetables

Take young, fresh, sugar corn, brush the ears well to remove all of the silk, wash, scrape off the kernels with a sharp knife, then can as directed for other vegetables.

Succotash - How To Can Vegetables

A good combination for succotash is an equal portion of lima beans and 6weet corn, but as this is rather difficult to keep, longer boiling than for other vegetables is advisable.