Put into a broad stewpan or saucepan a flat layer of mutton chops, freed entirely from fat and from the greater portion of the bone, then just dipped into cold water, seasoned with pepper, and lightly dredged with flour; on these put a layer of mild turnips sliced half an inch thick, and divided into squares; then some carrots of the same thickness, with a seasoning of salt and black pepper between them; next, another layer of chops, then plenty of vegetables, and as much weak broth or cold water as will barely cover the whole; bring them slowly to a boil, and let them just simmer from two to three hours, according to the quantity. One or two minced onions may be strewed between the other vegetables when their flavour is liked. The savour of the dish will be increased by browning the chops in a, little butter before they are stewed, and still more so by frying the vegetables lightly as well, before they are added to it. A head or two of celery would to many tastes improve the flavour of the whole.

In summer, cucumber, green onions, shred lettuces, and green peas may be substituted for the winter vegetables.

Mutton, free from fat, 2 1/2 lbs.; turnips, 3 lbs.; carrots, 3 lbs.; celery (if added), 2 small heads: 2 to 3 hours.

Observations:

The fat and trimmings of the mutton used for this and for other dishes into which only the lean is admissible may be turned to advantage by cutting the whole up rather small, and then boiling it in a quart of water to the pound, with a little spice, a bunch of herbs and some salt, until the fat is nearly dissolved: the liquid will then, if strained off and left until cold, make tolerable broth, and the cake of fat which is on the top, if again just melted and poured free of sediment into small pans, will serve excellently for common pies and for frying kitchen dinners. Less water will of course produce broth of better quality, and the addition of a small quantity of fresh meat or bones will render it very good.