Garnishing, And Setting Out A Table

In preparing meat for the table, and in laying out the table, refer ence ought to be had to the carving department - a very onerous one to all, and to many a very disagreeable one. The carving-knife of course ought to be sharp, and if to be used by a lady, in particular, light and handy; dexterity and address in the manner of using it being more required than strength, either in the knife or the carver. When a lady presides, a seat sufficiently high for her to have a complete command over the joints should be provided, and the dish should be sufficiently deep and capacious, so as not to endanger the splashing of the gravy. It should also be placed as near to the carver as possible, leaving room for his or her plate. A knife with a long blade is required for a large fleshy joint; for ham or bacon a middling sized, sharp-pointed one is preferable, and for poultry or game a short knife and sharp-pointed is best. Some like this knife a little curved. We do not presume to give any directions as respects the serving of the guests; no one it is presumed would take the head of the table not acquainted with the common rules of politeness, which principally consist in endeavouring to please everybody.