Flead is the provincial name for the leaf, or inside fat of a pig, which makes excellent crust when fresh, much finer, indeed, than after it is melted into lard. Clear it quite from skin, and slice it very thin into the flour, add sufficient salt to give flavour to the paste, and make the whole up smooth and firm with cold water; lay it on a clean dresser, and beat it forcibly with a rolling-pin until the flead is blended perfectly with the flour. It may then be made into cakes with a paste-cutter, or used for pies, round the edges of which a knife should be passed, as the crust rises better when cut than if merely rolled to the proper size. With the addition of a small quantity of butter, which may either be broken into the flour before the flead is mixed with it, or rolled into the paste after it is beaten, it will be found equal to fine puff crust, with the advantage of being more easy of digestion.

Quite common crust: flour, 1 1/4 lb.; flead, 8 ozs.; salt, 1 small tea-spoonful. Good common crust: flour, 1 lb.; flead, 6 ozs.; butter, 2 ozs. Rich crust: flead, 3/4 lb.; butter, 2 ozs.; flour, 1 lb. The crust is very good when made without any butter.