How To Roast A Shoulder Of Mutton

Flour it well, and baste it constantly with its own dripping; do not place it close enough to the fire for the fat to be in the slightest degree burned, or even too deeply browned. An hour and a half will roast it, if it be of moderate size. Stewed onions are often sent to table with it A shoulder of mutton is sometimes boiled, and smothered with onion sauce.

1 1/2 hour.

Spiced Shoulder Of Mutton

Bone the joint, and rub it, if large, with four ounces of the coarsest sugar (or with three, if it be small), well mixed with a dessertspoonful of pounded cloves, half that quantity of pepper and of mace, and a fourth part as much of ginger: the following day add four ounces of salt. Keep the mutton turned, and rubbed occasionally with the pickle from eight to ten days; then roll it up tight, bind it with a fillet, and stew it gently for four hours in a pint and a half of beef broth, or put into the stewpan with it a pound and a half of neck of beef, three half pints of water, one large mild onion, two carrots, two turnips, and a large faggot of herbs. When the mutton is perfectly tender, serve it with some of its own gravy, thickened and highly flavoured with lemon-pickle, or with any other acid sauce; or send it to table with a good sauce piquante.

Mutton, 8 to 9 lbs.; sugar, 4 ozs.; cloves, in powder, 1 dessertspoonful ; mace, and pepper, 1 teaspoonful each; ginger, 1/2 teaspoonful; salt, 4 ozs.: 8 to 10 days. Beef broth, 1 1/2 pint: 4 hours.

Observations:

For variety, the inside of the mutton may be thickly strewed with minced herbs before it is rolled.

Forced Shoulder Of Mutton

Cut off all the flesh from the inside of the joint down to the blade-bone, and reserve it for a separate dish. It may be lightly browned with some turnips or carrots, or both, and made into a small harrico, or stewed simply in its own gravy, or it will make in part, a pudding or a pie. Bone the mutton (see page 140), flatten it on a table, lay over the inside some thin and neatly-trimmed slices of striped bacon, and spread over them some good veal forcemeat (No. 1, page 122) to within an inch of the outer edge; roll the joint up tightly towards the knuckle (of which the bone may be left in or not, at pleasure), secure it well with tape or twine, and stew it gently in good gravy, from four hours to four and a half.

4 to 4 1/2 hours.

Observations:

In France it is usual to substitute sausage-meat for the bacon and veal stuffing in this dish.