How To Bone A Shoulder of Veal, Mutton Or Lamb

Spread a clean cloth upon a table or dresser, and lay the joint flat upon it, with the skin downwards; with a sharp knife cut off the flesh from the inner side, nearly down to the blade bone, of which detach the edges first, then work the knife under it, keeping it always close to the bone, and using all possible precaution not to pierce the outer skin; when it is in every part separated from the flesh, loosen it from the socket with the point of the knife, and remove it; or, without dividing the two bones, cut round the joint until it is freed entirely from the meat, and proceed to detach the second bone. That of the knuckle is frequently left in, but for some dishes it is necessary to take it out; in doing this, be careful not to tear the skin. A most excellent grill may be made by leaving sufficient meat for it upon the bones of a shoulder of mutton, when they are removed from the joint: it will be found very superior to the broiled blade-bone of a roast shoulder, which is so much esteemed by many people.

Stewed Shoulder of Veal

(English receipt.) Bone a shoulder of veal, and strew the inside thickly with savoury herbs, minced small; season it well with salt, cayenne, and pounded mace; and place on these a layer of ham cut in thin slices, and freed from rind and rust. Roll the veal, and bind it tightly with a fillet; roast it for an hour and a half, then simmer it gently in good brown gravy for five hours; add forcemeat balls before it is dished; skim the fat from the gravy, and serve it with the meat. This receipt, for which we are indebted to a correspondent on whom we can depend, and which we have not, therefore, proved ourselves, is for a joint which weighs ten pounds before it is boned.

Shoulder of Veal or Mutton, boned and rolled.

Shoulder of Veal or Mutton, boned and rolled.