(buttered apples. Excellent.) Pare six or eight fine apples of a firm kind, but of a good cooking sort, and core without piercing them through, or dividing them; fill the cavities with fresh butter, put a quarter-pound more cut small into a stewpan just large enough to contain the apples in a single layer, place them closely together on it, and stew them as softly as possible, turning them occasionally until they are almost sufficiently tender to serve; then strew upon them as much sifted sugar as will sweeten the dish highly, and a teaspoonful of pounded cinnamon; shake these well in and upon the fruit, and stew it for a few minutes longer. Lift it out, arrange it in a hot dish, put into each apple as much warm apricot jam as it will contain, and lay a small quantity on the top; pour the syrup from the pan round, but not on the fruit, and serve it immediately.

Apples, 6 to 8; fresh butter, 4 ozs., just simmered till tender. Sugar, 6 to 8 ozs.; cinnamon, 1 teaspoonful: 5 minutes. Apricot jam as needed.

Observations:

Particular care must be taken to keep the apples entire; they should rather steam in a gentle heat than boil. It is impossible to specify the precise time which will render them sufficiently tender, as this must depend greatly on the time of year and the sort of fruit. If the stewpan were placed in a very slow oven, the more regular heat of it would perhaps be better in its effect than the stewing.