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The Modern Housewife Or Menagere | by Alexis Soyer



Comprising nearly one thousand receipts, for the economic and judicious preparation of every meal of the my, with those of the nursery and sick room, and minute directions for family management in all its branches. Illustrated with engravings.

TitleThe Modern Housewife Or Menagere
AuthorAlexis Soyer
PublisherD. Appleton & Company
Year1850
Copyright1849, D. Appleton & Company
AmazonThe Modern Housewife Or Menagere

The Modern Housewife

Or

Book Cover

BY Alexis Soyer, Author Of "The Gastronomic Regenerator."

Edited By An American Housekeeper.

-Preface By The Editor
In adapting M. Soyer's admirable receipt book to the use of American families, I have not presumed to amend, or attempted to improve upon the text of so accomplished a master of the art, which may wit...
-Introduction
In the following gossipping conversation between Mrs. B------ and Mrs. L------, and in the two letters which follow, M. Soyer explains the motive of the work; and, in a natural manner introduces the s...
-Breakfasts
When we first commenced housekeeping, we were six in family, five of whom breakfasted together, the three young men in the shop, Mr. B------, and myself. The cloth was laid by the servant girl at half...
-First Series Of Receipts
Perhaps some housekeepers may laugh at the presumption of M. Soyer in attempting to give a formal receipt for so trifling a matter as making a piece of toast. But, in Cookery, there are no trifles. Ev...
-1. Toast
Procure a nice square loaf of bread that has been baked one or two days previously (for new bread cannot be cut, and would eat very heavy), then with a sharp knife cut off the bottom crust very evenly...
-2. Dry Toast
Ought not to be toasted until quite ready to serve; when done, place it in a toast-rack, or standing upon its edges, one piece resting against another; any kind of toast that has been made half an hou...
-4. How To Toast Crumpets
Crumpets stand lower in the general estimation of the public, probably from not being so distingue, and having the misfortune to be cheaper than their sister muffins ; but, for all that, the poor ough...
-5. How To Make Rolls And Other Breakfast Bread
Put four pounds of flour into an earthen pan, make a hole in the centre, in which put three parts of a pint of warm water, to which you add a gill of white brewer's yeast, free from bitter, mix a litt...
-6. How To Make Muffins
Mix a quart of warm water in which you have dissolved a quarter of a pound of German yeast, with sufficient flour to form a stiffish batter, which let remain in a warm place four hours, then stir the ...
-7. How To Make Crumpets
Mix a gill of brewer's yeast, free from bitter, with two quarts of water, just lukewarm, to which add sufficient flour to make a thinnish batter, and let it stand six hours in a warm place, when stir ...
-8. Husks
Put three pounds of flour upon a dresser, make a hole in the middle, into which put two ounces of German yeast, dissolved in a pint of warm water, mix a little of the flour in, and leave it half an ho...
-9. Tops And Bottoms
Make a dough exactly as described in the last, but using only half the butter; have a deep-edged baking-sheet well buttered, and when the dough is ready, turn it on to a dresser, well floured; divide ...
-10. Buns
Put three pounds of flour in an earthen pan, make a hole in the middle, in which put two ounces of German yeast, dissolved in three parts of a pint of warm water, and stir in a little of the flour, fo...
-11. Brioche Rolls
Put four pounds of flour upon a dresser, one pound of which put on one side, make a hole in the middle into which pour nearly three parts of a pint of warm water, in which you have dissolved an ounce ...
-12. How To Choose Eggs
New-laid eggs should not be used until they have been laid about eight or ten hours, for that part which constitutes the white is not properly set before that time, and does not until then obtain thei...
-13. Eggs For Breakfast, - Plain Boiled
Put about a pint of water to boil in any kind of small stewpan (or saucepan) over the fire; when boiling, put in two or three fresh eggs, gently, with a spoon, being particular not to crack them or al...
-14. Eggs Au Beurre : A New Method
Let the eggs boil six minutes instead of three, then take them out, dip them for two seconds in cold water, crack and peel off the shells, and lay them in a hot plate (they will remain-quite whole if ...
-15. How To Boil Eggs Hard
Never boil eggs for salads, sauces, or any other purposes, more than ten minutes, and when done place them in a basin of cold water for five minutes to cool: take off their shells, and use them when r...
-16. Poached Eggs
Put a pint of water in a stewpan, with four teaspoonfuls of vinegar and half a teaspoonful of salt, place it over the fire, and when boiling, break your eggs into it as near the surface of the water a...
-17. Toast And Eggs
Break three eggs into a small stew-pan, add a saltspoonful of salt, a quarter of that quantity of pepper, and two ounces of fresh butter (the fresher the better), set the stewpan over a moderate fire,...
-18. Eggs Sur Le Plat
Lightly butter a small oval dish, upon which break two, three, or more eggs without breaking the yolks, season lightly with a little white pepper and salt, put a few small pieces of butter here and th...
-20. Herring Toast Sandwich
Choose a bloater for this purpose not too dry, which split in two, cutting it down the back; lay them upon a plate and pour a pint of boiling water over; let them soak five minutes, when lay them upon...
-21. Toast And Eggs With Herring
Prepare your toast and eggs as directed (No. 17), but previous to pouring the eggs over, lay the flesh of a herring as directed in the last, and pour the eggs over that. Herrings upon toast, with a la...
-22. Fish For Breakfast, - Bloated Herrings
They require to be freshly salted, for if dry they are quite rank and unpalatable; scrape them lightly with a knife, and wipe them well with a cloth; pass the point of a knife down the back from head ...
-23. Dried Haddock
A very excellent thing for breakfast, but they never ought to be cooked whole, for one side being thinner than the other is of course dried up before the other is much more than half done, especially ...
-24. Whitings
Of all the modes of preparing and dressing whitings for breakfast I cannot but admire and prize the system pursued by the Scotch, which renders them the most light, wholesome, and delicious food that ...
-25. Slips Or Small Soles
When cleaned, season them with a little pepper and salt, dip lightly into flour, and broil them slowly over a moderate fire about ten minutes, or according to the size; when done, place them upon a ho...
-27. Meat For Breakfast, - Sheep's Kidneys
Procure as many as you may require for your party, about one each is generally sufficient; be sure that they are fresh, which any person can ascertain by smelling, if not able to judge by their appear...
-28. Kidneys On Toast
Prepare the kidneys precisely as in the last, but when done have ready a piece of hot toast, which butter lightly; lay the kidneys upon it; have ready a small piece of butter, to which you have added ...
-29. Kidney Bread-Crumbed, A La Maitre D'Hotel
Prepare the kidneys as before, and when upon the skewer, have ready upon a plate an egg well beat up with a fork; season the kidneys with a little salt and pepper, dip them into the egg, then lightly ...
-30. Sauted Kidneys
Should you not have a fire fit for broiling, put an ounce of butter into a saute-pan (which of course must be very clean), cut the kidney in halves lengthwise; and when the butter is melted, lay them ...
-31. Bacon And Ham, How To Choose Both Fit For Broiling
Ham for broiling ought not to be too old or too dry, it would perhaps eat rank: nothing requires more care than broiling. Either get a slice of ham weighing a quarter of a pound or two ounces, whic...
-32. Ham And Eggs
While your ham is doing, break two fresh eggs in the pan, season slightly with salt and pepper, set it before the fire till the eggs are delicately done, and slip them whole carefully into your dish, ...
-33. Bacon
The streaky part of a thick flank of bacon is to be preferred; cut nice slices not above a quarter of an inch thick, take off the rind, put to broil on the gridiron over a clear fire, turn it three or...
-34. Sausages
Sausages are very frequently esteemed for breakfast. By all means, never use them, except you are confident that they are fresh. The skin must be transparent, that the meat should be seen through; the...
-35. Sausages, How To Cook Them
Prick them with a pin all round about twenty times, put them on the gridiron over a gentle fire, turn three or four times, by doing which you will have them a very nice yellow color; dish them, and se...
-36. Sauted Sausages
If your fire smokes, it is preferable to saute them; put some butter in the pan, with four sausages; after you have pricked them as before mentioned, saute gently, a few minutes will do them, turn the...
-37. Black Puddings, Broiled
Make about six or eight incisions through the skin with a knife, in a slanting way, on each side of the pudding; put it on the gridiron for about eight minutes, on rather a brisk fire, turn it four ti...
-On Coffee
Coffee, which has now come so generally into use, originally came from Arabia, where it has been known from time immemorial, but was brought into use in England in the year 1653 ; as it is not general...
-39. Coffee, French Fashion
To a pint of coffee, made as before directed, add a pint of boiling milk, warm both together until nearly boiling, and serve. The French never use it any other way for breakfast. ...
-40. White Coffee, A New Style
Put two ounces of un-ground coffee, slightly roasted, into a clean stewpan, which set upon a moderate fire, slowly warming the coffee through, shaking the stewpan round every half-minute; when very ho...
-41. Coffee, Made With A Filter
To make a quart; first put a pint of boiling water through the filter to warm it, which again pour away, then put a quarter of a pound of ground coffee upon the filter, upon which put the presser ligh...
-43. Chocolate
Scrape two ounces of the cake, which put into a stew or saucepan, with a gill of water, upon the fire, keeping it stirred with a wooden spoon until rather thick, when work it quickly with the spoon, s...
-44. Chocolate Made In The Italian Method
Procure a reafu-lar chocolate-pot with a muller, the handle of which comes through the lid, one might be procured at any brazier's, put in two ounces of chocolate (scraped), over which by degrees pour...
-45. Cocoa
Put a teaspoonful and a half of canistered cocoa into a cup, which fill by degrees with boiling milk, stir it until dissolved, when it is ready to serve : sugar separately. ...
-Letter No. III
Oatlands Cottage, Jan. 20, 1849. Dear Hortense, - I have inclosed the whole of the receipts which you have sent me for the breakfasts, properly classified, having omitted the cold meats (as you des...
-Early Luncheons. Letter No. IV
My dear Friend, - I feel perfectly satisfied with the manner in which you have classified my receipts respecting the breakfasts, and must say I felt very much interested in looking over them ; I am co...
-The Nursery Dinner. Letter No. V
Dear Friend, - Now here I must call your especial attention to the way many people treat this department of domestic comfort, which is often very slight and irregular. Now, for my part, I have made qu...
-49. Porridge
When children are delicate, porridge is often preferable to bread and milk. Put two tablespoonfuls of Scotch grits or oatmeal in the milk saucepan, which moisten with half a pint of milk ; let it boil...
-54. Meat For Invalids
The best meat as food for invalids is, in fact, that which is principally used, mutton and beef, lamb, if not too young (sweetbreads, I consider, ought oftener to be introduced), and calves' feet or h...
-55. Plain Mutton Broth For Invalids
Get one pound of scrag of mutton, break the bone with a chopper, without separating the meat, then put it into a stewpan with three pints of water and a salt-spoonful of salt; boil gently two hours, c...
-56. Seasoned Mutton Broth
Put the same quantity of mutton and water into your stewpan, add double the quantity of salt, and a quarter ditto brown sugar, quarter of a middle-sized onion, very little celery, and one ounce of tur...
-57. Mutton Broth (With Variations). With Vermicelli
Having made your broth, and passed it through a sieve, as before, put the meat and vegetables upon a plate, and the broth back into the same stewpan; when boiling, if about a quart, add one or two tab...
-61. Veal Broth (French Method)
The following is much recommended by French physicians: - Put one pound of veal from knuckle, with but very little of the bone, into a stewpan with three pints of water and a salt-spoonful of salt, pl...
-64. Soyer's New Way Of Making Beef Tea
Cut a pound of solid beef into very small dice, which put into a stewpan, with a small pat of butter, a clove, two button onions, and a salt-spoonful of salt, stir the meat round over the fire for a f...
-66. Pure Osmazome, Or Essence Of Meat
Take two pounds of the flesh of any animal or bird (the older the better for obtaining the true flavor), as free from sinew as possible, and mince it well; place it in a Florence oil-flask, and cork i...
-67. Chicken Broth
Put half a raw chicken into a stewpan, with a quart of water, a little leek and celery, with a salt-spoonful of salt, and a few sprigs of parsley (if allowed), set the stewpan upon the fire; when boil...
-68. Eel Broth, Very Strengthening
Take a small eel, which skin as described, and wash well, then cut into slices, which put into a small saucepan, just covered with water, add a little salt, a few sprigs of parsley, two button onions,...
-69. Lait De Poule, French Remedy For Colds
May be made from any of the foregoing broths, and for colds is excellent. Break a fresh egg, separate the white from the yolk, put the yolk in a basin, with a quarter of a gill of good cream or milk, ...
-72. Rice Milk Seasoned
Proceed exactly as in the last, but when the rice is quite tender add an ounce of butter, two tea-spoonfuls of sugar, and a little salt, stir well together, and it is then ready; this must neither be ...
-73. Vermicelli Au Lait
Boil a pint of milk, and when boiling add sufficient vermicelli to make it about the thickness of the last article; it may be served quite plain if required, or seasoned as for the riz au lait, but om...
-74. Semoulina Au Lait
Boil a pint of milk, and when boiling add a tablespoonful of semoulina, stirring it gently, to prevent its becoming lumpy; let it simmer twenty minutes, and serve either plain or seasoned, as for the ...
-75. Tapioca Au Lait
Proceed exactly as in the last, but it will require rather longer to simmer before the tapioca is tender; and, by way of change, add a little grated lemon-peel, or a glass of white wine, if allowed by...
-76. Arrow-Root
Put two teaspoonfuls of arrow-root, which mix gradually with enough water or milk, stirring it with a spoon, let it boil a few minutes, and if made with milk, add only a little butter, sugar, and salt...
-77. Gruel
Put two tablespoonfuls of oatmeal or prepared groats into a stewpan, and by degrees add a pint of water, mixing smoothly with a wooden spoon, place it upon the fire, keeping it well stirred, until it ...
-78. Gruel From Scotch Groats
Proceed as above, but adding rather more water, and boiling a few minutes longer; many people prefer eating it with the rough groats in it, but if objectionable, place a small clean sieve over the bas...
-79. Sago Gruel
Put two tablespoonfuls of sago into a small saucepan, which moisten gradually with a pint of cold water, set it over a slow fire, keeping it stirred until becoming rather thickish and clear, similar t...
-80. Arrow-Root, Transparent Jelly
Put a good teaspoonful of arrow-root into a basin, which mix smoothly with two spoonfuls of water, then add enough boiling water to make it about the consistency of starch, stirring all the time, pour...
-81. French Panada, For Aged People, Invalids, And Children
Break a stale penny roll into a saucepan, in which pour just sufficient water to cover the bread, stir well over the fire, allowing it to boil five minutes, then add half a teaspoonful of salt, and tw...
-82. Barley Water
Put half a gallon of water into a very clean saucepan, with two ounces of clean (but unwashed) pearl barley, when boiling, carefully skim it with a tablespoon, and add half the rind of a small lemon, ...
-83. Rice Water
Put a quart of water to boil in a saucepan, with a handful of clean rice (but not washed), place it upon the fire, and let boil gently until the rice is quite in a pulp, then pass it through a hair si...
-84. A New Drink
Put half a gallon of water upon the fire, and when boiling, have ready four pippin apples (quite ripe), cut each apple into eight slices, without peeling them, throw them into the water, which keep bo...
-85. Cooling Drink
Bake four or six apples, without peeling them; when done and quite hot, put them into, a jug, and pour over three pints of boiling water ; cover the jug over with paper, and when cold it is ready for ...
-86. Almond Water
Put five ounces of sweet and two of bitter almonds into a saucepan, with a pint of hot water, set them upon the fire, and, when boiling, strain them upon a sieve, take off their skins, and set them in...
-87. Barley Lemonade
Put a quarter of a pound of sugar into a small stewpan, with half a pint of water, which boil about ten minutes, or until forming a thickish syrup ; then add the rind of a fresh lemon and the pulp of ...
-88. A Refreshing Beverage
Slice two oranges and one lemon, which put into a jug, with two ounces of sugarcandy, over which pour one quart of boiling water ; stir it occasionally until cold, when drink it a little at a time, as...
-89. Raspberry Vinegar Beverage
Put two tablespoonfuls of raspberry vinegar into a cup, over which pour half a pint of boiling water ; when cold, use it as you may be instructed or when necessary ; any kind of fruit syrup would answ...
-90. A Very Strengthening Drink
Put a teacupful of pearl-barley into a saucepan, with three pints of cold water, the rind of a lemon and a small piece of cinnamon ; boil the whole very gently until the barley becomes tender, when st...
-91. Fresh Fruit Water
Fresh fruits, when in season, are very preferable to syrups, which are but seldom well made, except at some of the first confectioners or Italian warehouses. Pick a bottle of fresh raspberries or s...
-92. Cherry Draught
Choose a pound of good fleshy cherries, from which take the stalk and stones, have a pint of syrup boiling, into which throw them, to boil as fast as possible for ten minutes, then take them from the ...
-93. Arrow-Root Water
Put half a gallon of water to boil with two apples, the same as in No. 84, with the addition of a stick of cinnamon; let the whole boil half an hour, then mix two large spoonfuls of arrow-root with ha...
-94. French Herb Broth
This is a very favorite beverage in France, as well with people in a state of health as with invalids, especially in the spring, when the herbs are young and green. Put a quart of water to boil, but h...
-95. Dry Plum Beverage
Put a quart of water in a saucepan upon the fire, and, when boiling, throw in twelve fresh dry-French plums, and let them boil twenty minutes, then pour them in a basin with the liquor to cool; when c...
-96. Figs And Apple Beverage
Have two quarts of water boiling, into which throw six fresh dry figs, previously opened, and two apples, previously cut into six or eight pieces each; let the whole boil together twenty minutes, then...
-97. Stewed Plums
Put twelve French plums in a stew-pan, with a spoonful of brown sugar, a gill of water, a little cinnamon, and some thin rind of a lemon; let them stew twenty minutes, then pour them in a basin until ...
-99. Cooling Lemonade
Put a quart of water in a stew-pan to boil, into which put two moist dried figs, each split in two; let it boil a quarter of an hour, then have ready the peel of a lemon, taken off rather thickly, and...
-100. Imperial, A Cooling Drink For The Spring
Two ounces of cream of tartar, two lemons, juice and peel, four ounces of sugar; place in a stone jug, and pour about six quarts of boiling water; allow it to get cold, and bottle for use ; or, instea...
-101. Orangeade
Proceed as for lemonade, but using the whole of the orange, a little of the peel included, sweetening with sugar candy, and adding a teaspoonful of arrow-root mixed with a little cold water, which pou...
-102. Toast And Water
The ease and simplicity of making this popular drink is probably the cause of its not being well made one time in ten, that is, in private families ; the bread is too much or too little done, or there...
-103. Apple And Rice
Boil half an ounce of Carolina rice in a gill of milk until very tender, then add a very small piece of butter, sugar, a little cinnamon, and a grain of salt; then peel, core, and slice a middling-siz...
-104. Custard Pudding
Boil one pint of milk, with a small piece of lemon-peel and half a bay-leaf, for three minutes; then pour these on to three eggs, mix it with one ounce of sugar well together, and pour it into a butte...
-105. Rice Puddings
Wash well two ounces of rice in some water, strain, then put it into a pint and a half of boiling milk, with a small piece of lemon-peel, cinnamon, and half a bay-leaf, tied together; let it boil gent...
-106. Macaroni Pudding
Blanch two ounces of Naples macaroni in some water for eight or ten minutes; strain it, add it to one pint of boiling milk, in which you have previously boiled a piece of lemon-peel, cinnamon, and one...
-107. Vermicelli Pudding
Boil one pint of milk, with a piece of lemon-peel, half a bay-leaf, and a piece of cinnamon, then add one ounce of vermicelli; when reduced to half, add two eggs, and a little sugar ; pour these in a ...
-108. Tapioca Pudding
Boil one pint of milk, with a piece of lemon-peel and a little cinnamon ; then add two ounces of tapioca; reduce to half; add two eggs, and one ounce of butter ; pour these in a buttered mould, and st...
-109. Bread Pudding
Boil one pint of milk, with a piece of cinnamon and lemon-peel; pour it on two ounces of bread-crumbs ; then add two eggs, half an ounce of currants, and a little sugar : steam it in a buttered mould ...
-110. Cabinet Pudding
Boil one pint of milk, with a piece of lemon-peel, pour it on one ounce of sponge biscuit, let it soak half an hour, then add three eggs, half an ounce of currants, and very little sugar: steam it in ...
-111. Bread And Butter Pudding
Butter a tart-dish well and sprinkle some currants all round it, then lay in a few slices of bread and butter ; boil one pint of milk, pour it on two eggs well whipped, and then on the bread and butte...
-112. A Small Bread Pudding
Cut an ounce of the crumb of bread into thin slices, with the least piece of butter spread over each, which place in a small tart-dish ; then break an egg into a cup with a teaspoonful of sugar and a ...
-Fish for Invalids
Slips, soles, flounders, whitings, and smelts are the lightest of any fish, and upon that account more to be recommended to invalids in a state of convalescence. ...
-Whiting
113. Whiting, Plain Boiled Put two quarts of water into a small fish kettle, with about an ounce of salt; when boiling, put in the whiting, draw the kettle to the corner of the fire to keep it just...
-118. A Mutton Chop
Meat, Game, and Poultry, of every kind, for invalids, ought to be served as free from fat as possible. Choose one from a lean loin of mutton, or if one in the house rather fat cut the greater part ...
-119. Plain Mutton Cutlet, From The Neck
An invalid will frequently be tired of a mutton chop; and for my own part I must say a cutlet is far superior in flavor, and has a much neater appearance; cut off a rib from the neck, of the same thic...
-120. Stewed Chop Or Cutlet
Put it into a stewpan or small saucepan, with a pint of water, and a little salt and sugar; let it stew as gently as possible from an hour and a half to two hours, skim off all the scum and fat, and t...
-121. Beef, Hump Steak
The tenderest part of the rump should be selected, about half a pound, not cut too thick, and very even; place it upon your gridiron over a moderate fire, turning it frequently; when done, sprinkle a ...
-122. Stewed Beef
Put the same quantity of beef as in the last into a saucepan, with a quart of water, which place over the fire, and when beginning to boil, well skim, then add a little celery, turnip, and carrot, the...
-123. Lamb Chops Or Cutlets
Proceed as just described for mutton, but being more delicate, they will require but little more than half the time to cook. 124. Lambs' Feet are very nutritious; purchase them ready cleaned; lay t...
-125. Roast Chicken
Procure a nice plump chicken, which draw and truss, and cut the sinews; pass the spit through under the skewer as usual, and set it down before a clear fire; after being there five minutes, have ready...
-126. Boiled Chicken
Put a quart of water to boil in a saucepan, with a saltspoonful of salt, and two ounces of butter; when boiling, lay in the chicken, which keep gently simmering for twenty minutes, when it will be don...
-127. Partridge
Proceed in every manner to roast as just directed for the chicken; a young one would require about ten minutes, or an old one fifteen, but then the breast only ought to be eaten; whatever remains may ...
-129. Pulled Fowl
With the remainder of a roast or boiled fowl or chicken you may make a very light dish, by pulling off all the flesh with a fork, and putting it into a stewpan, then in another stewpan place all the b...
-Culinary Correspondence. Letter No. VI
Dearest Eloise,- I here inclose you the last receipt which I intend to give you for invalids. 'You will, no doubt, fancy that my diet is extravagant; but let me teach you that when you must pay the do...
-Letter No. VII
My dear Mrs. B. - Your observation upon the way many people five in this country is no doubt very correct, but do you not think that if you were not quite so abrupt on the subject, we should probably ...
-Letter No. VIII
Many compliments to you, my dear Mrs. L. At your request I here inclose the list you require, and which will show you how circumscribed the middle classes are in respect to the variation of their m...
-Letter No. IX
My dear Hortense, - After the receipt of your last observations, which, on first seeing, I thought too long, but after having read them over again, I am convinced that I shall not be able to shorten t...
-Letter No. X
My dear Eloise, - I am glad to hear that you will not alter any of my last copy sent, because I assure you I wrote with a full conviction that I was right, and from facts which experience alone can en...
-Letter No. XI
My dear Hortense, - Never were you inspired by a better idea respecting your new plan: it is so clearly explained, that I fancy our labor is over; but I must tell you that, on the receipt of your last...
-Roasting, Baking, Boiling, Stewing, Braising, Frying, Saute'ing, Broiling
Roasting being the most general in use, we will first describe it, although not that which was first put in practice in cooking, it being evidently an improvement on broiling: we can easily understand...
-Frying
Of all the apparently simple modes of cookery there is none more so than that of frying, but yet how rare to meet with it done properly. I believe it is to be attributed, in a great measure, to the id...
-Sauteing
You will perceive, dearest, by the following, that the word fried is often wrongly used in cookery instead of the word saute, which process is totally different, and produces quite another effect on f...
-Sauces
Sauces in cookery are like the first rudiments of grammar, which consists of certain rules called Syntax, which is the foundation of all languages: these fundamental rules are nine, so has cookery the...
-130. White Sauce
Cut and chop a knuckle of veal, weighing about four pounds, into large dice; also half a pound of lean bacon; butter the bottom of a large stewpan with a quarter of a pound of butter, add two onions, ...
-131. Brown Sauce
Put two ounces of butter into a stew-pan, rub it over the bottom, peel two or three large onions, cut them in thick slices, lay them on the bottom, cut into small pieces about two pounds of knuckle of...
-132. Demi-Glaze - Thin Brown Sauce For Made Dishes
When I have a small dinner-party, I always, as I told you before, make small quantities of white and brown sauce as above, but this is a nice way of clarifying a brown sauce without much trouble, and ...
-133. Thin Brown Sauce Of Mushrooms
Put twelve table-spoonfuls of thin brown sauce in a small stewpan to boil, then have six or eight small mushrooms well cleaned and washed, chop them fine, and place in sauce, and boil for five minutes...
-134. Eschalot Sauce
Chop fine about a good tablespoonful of eschalot, wash them by placing them in the corner of a napkin, and pouring water over them ; press them until dry, put them in a small stewpan with two tablespo...
-135. Piquant Sauce
Put two tablespoonfuls of chopped onions, or eschalots, cleaned as above, into a stewpan; put also four tablespoonfuls of vinegar and a bay-leaf, and boil; then add ten tablespoonfuls of brown sauce, ...
-136. Tarragon Sauce
Put eight tablespoonfuls of demi-glaze, and four of broth, into a stewpan ; boil for a few minutes, add a tablespoonful of vinegar, have ready picked twenty leaves of fresh tarragon, put in to simmer ...
-137. Brown Cucumber Sauce
Peel a small fresh cucumber, cut it in neat pieces, put in a stewpan with a little sugar, add half an ounce of butter, set it on a slow fire, stir it now and then, add twelve tablespoonfuls of brown s...
-138. Mince Herb Sauce
Put two tablespoonfuls of finely chopped onions in a stewpan, add a tablespoonful of oil, place it on the fire, stir a few minutes, add ten tablespoonfuls of demi-glaze and four of broth or water ; bo...
-139. Italian Herb Sauce
Proceed in the same way as the above, only add a little chopped thyme and a small glass of sherry. ...
-140. Robert Sauce
Peel and cut up two good-sized onions, put them in a stewpan with an ounce of butter till they are a nice yellow color, then add eight tablespoonfuls of demi-glaze, and two of water or broth ; skim, b...
-141. Ravigote Sauce
Put in a stewpan one middle-sized onion sliced, with a little carrot, a little thyme, bay-leaf, one clove, a little mace, a little scraped horseradish, a little butter, fry a few minutes, then add thr...
-142. Brown Mushroom Sauce
Clean and cut twelve small mushrooms in slices, place them in a stewpan with a little butter, salt, pepper, the juice of a quarter of a lemon, set it on a slow fire for a few minutes, then add ten spo...
-143. Orange Sauce For Game
Peel half an orange, removing all the pith; cut it into slices, and then in fillets ; put them in a gill of water to boil for two minutes; drain them on a sieve, throwing the water away; place in the ...
-144. Garlic Sauce
Though many dislike the flavor of this root, yet those that like it ought not to be deprived of it. Put in a stewpan ten tablespoonfuls of demi-glaze, a little tomatos if handy ; boil it a few minutes...
-145. Mint Sauce For Lamb
Take three tablespoonfuls of chopped leaves of green mint, three tablespoonfuls of brown sugar, and put into a basin with half a pint of brown vinegar; stir it well up, add one saltspoonful of salt, a...
-146. Liaison Of Eggs
Break the yolks of three eggs in a basin, with which mix six spoonfuls of milk, or eight of cream ; pass it through a fine sieve, and use when directed. ...
-147. Anchovy Butter Sauce
Put into a stewpan eight spoonfuls of demi-glaze, or three of broth; when boiling, add one ounce of anchovy butter; stir continually till melted: serve where directed. ...
-148. Soyer's Sauce
Put six spoonfuls of demi-glaze into a stewpan ; when hot, add four spoonfuls of Soyer's Gentleman's Sauce; let boil, and serve with either chop, steak, cotelettes, poultry, or game. ...
-149. Papillotte Sauce
Scrape half an ounce of fat bacon, put it in a pan with four tablespoonfuls of chopped onions, stir over the fire for a few minutes, then add ten tablespoonfuls of brown sauce, and boil; then add a ta...
-150. Tomato Sauce
If fresh, put six in a stewpan ; having removed the stalk, and squeezed them in the hand to remove pips, etc, add half an onion, sliced, a little thyme, bay-leaf, half an ounce of celery, one ounce of...
-151. Curry Bauce
This I generally keep ready-made in the larder, being very fond of what I consider such wholesome food as curry; but not liking to be troubled with making it often, I cause my cook to prepare a certai...
-152. A Very Good And Useful White Sauce (Quite New)
Put a quart of white sauce in a stewpan of a proper size on a fire; stir continually until reduced to one third; put two yolks of eggs in a basin, stir them well up, add your sauce gradually, keep sti...
-153. Onion Puree Sauce
Peel and cut six onions in slices; put in a stewpan, with a quarter of a pound of butter, a tea-spoonful of salt, one of sugar, a half one of pepper ; place on a slow fire to simmer till in a pulp, st...
-154. Puree Of Cauliflower Sauce
Boil a cauliflower well in three pints of water, in which you have previously put one ounce of butter, two tablespoonfuls of salt; when done, chop it up, having prepared and slowly cooked in a stewpan...
-156. Turnip Sauce Puree
Boil six middle-sized ones, press all the water you can out of them, and proceed as the above. ...
-157. White Cucumber Puree
Peel two, or one large one, cut in slices, put in the stewpan with the same vegetables, etc., as for the cauliflower; when tender, add a tablespoonful of flour, three gills of milk or broth, boil, and...
-158. Sorrel Sauce, Or Puree
Wash well four handfuls of sorrel, put it nearly dry into a middle-sized stewpan, with a little butter; let it melt, add a tablespoonful of flour, a tea-spoonful of salt, half one of pepper, moisten t...
-159. Spinach Puree (See Vegetables, 2d Course)
Endive is often used in France, and called chicor'ee. This puree may be made like the cauliflower, or only plainly chopped, put into a pan with two ounces of butter, a gill of white sauce, a little gr...
-160. Stewed Peas And Sprew (Grass
For cutlets, sweetbreads, fowls, or any dishes, they are applicable (see Vegetables, second course), also French beans, only using one third of the quantity that you would for a made dish for an entre...
-161. Scooped Jerusalem Artichokes
Scoop with a round cutter twenty-four pieces of artichoke, of the size of half an inch in diameter, wash them, put them in a small stewpan with half an ounce of butter and a quarter of an ounce of sug...
-162. Scooped Turnips
Proceed exactly the same, only serve a little thinner: they will not do if stringy. ...
-163. Button Onions
The same, only make the sauce thinner, and boil longer, according to their size. ...
-164. Young Carrots
Scrape and trim to shape twenty small and young carrots, pass in sugar and butter, add white or brown sauce, but keep it thinner, as it requires a longer time boiling; when tender, if for white sauce,...
-165. White Mushroom Sauce
Use small white ones; cut the dark part out and remove the tail, wash in several waters, put in a stewpan with a little butter, salt, pepper, juice of lemon, saute it for a few minutes, add a gill of ...
-166. White Cucumber Sauce
Peel two cucumbers, divide each lengthways into four, remove the pips, and cut into pieces one inch long; add, in stewpan one ounce of butter, a tea-spoonful of sugar, half of salt, let it stew on the...
-167. Ragout Of Quenelles
Make twelve nice small quenelles (see Quenelles), warm half a pint of white sauce, in which you have put four tablespoonfuls of milk, and half a teaspoonful of eschalot; when well done, pour on the li...
-168. Maitre D'Hotel Sauce
Put eight spoonfuls of white sauce in a stewpan, with four of white stock or milk; boil it five minutes, then stir in two ounces of mai'tre d' hotel butter; stir it quickly over the fire until the but...
-169. Green Peas Stewed
Put a pint of young peas, boiled very green, into a stewpan, with three table-spoonfuls of white sauce, two ounces of butter, a little sugar and salt, and two button onions, with parsley, tied togethe...
-170. Green Peas, With Bacon
Put a pint of well-boiled peas into a stewpan, with five spoonfuls of brown sauce, two of brown gravy, a teaspoonful of sugar, two button onions, and a bunch of parsley; let it boil about ten minutes ...
-171. Blanched Mushrooms
Get a pottle of fresh mushrooms, cut off the dirt, and likewise the heads (reserving the stalk for chopping), wash the heads in a basin of clean water, take them out and drain in a sieve ; put into a ...
-172. Onions Stuffed
Peel twelve large onions, cut a piece off at the top and bottom to give them a flat appearance, and which adds a better flavor if left, blanch them in four quarts of boiling water twenty minutes, then...
-173. Hot Tartar Sauce
Put two table-spoonfuls of white sauce in a small stewpan, four of broth or milk, boil a few minutes, then add two tablespoonfuls of the tartar sauce (see Salads) in it, stir it very quick with a wood...
-174. Mephistophelian Sauce
Do not be afraid of the title, for it has nothing diabolical about it; the first time I tried it was at Mr. B.'s birthday party ; and some of his friends having over and over again drank his health, t...
-Soups
In France, no dinner is served without soup, and no good soup is supposed to be made without the pot-au-feu (see No. 215), it being the national dish of the middle and poorer classes of that country; ...
-175. Stock For All Kinds Of Soup
Procure a knuckle of veal about six pounds in weight, which cut into pieces about the size of an egg, as also half a pound of lean ham or bacon; then rub a quarter of a pound of butter upon the bottom...
-177. Brown Gravies
Rub an ounce of butter over the bottom of a stewpan which would hold about three quarts; have ready peeled four onions, cut them into thick slices, with which cover the bottom of the stewpan; over the...
-178. Browning
When m business, and not so much time to devote to the kitchen, I used to make shift with a browning from the following receipt, using, however, but a very few drops : put two ounces of powdered sugar...
-180. How To Clarify Stock, If Required
In case, by some accident, your stock should not be clear, put it (say three quarts) into a stewpan, and place it over a good fire, skim well, and, when boiling, have ready the whites of three eggs (c...
-181. Clear Vegetable Soup
Peel a middling-sized carrot and turnip, which cut first into slices, then into small square pieces about the size of dice; peel also eighteen button onions; wash the whole in cold water, and drain th...
-182. Printanie'Re Soup
Cut a small quantity of vegetables as in the last, but rather less carrot and turnip, introducing a little celery, leek, and young spring onions, instead of the button onions; proceed exactly as befor...
-183. Julienne Soup
This soup is entirely the hereditary-property of France, and is supposed to be so called from the months of June and July, when all vegetables are in full season; and to make it in reality as original...
-184. Clear Turnip Soup
Cut, with a round vegetable scoop, about forty pieces of turnip, of the shape and size of small marbles, which put into a stewpan, with sugar and butter as before, but fry them of a light brownish col...
-185. Clear Artichoke Soup
Peel twelve Jerusalem artichokes, which well wash, then cut as many round scoops as possible, the same as in the last, proceeding exactly the same. The remainder of either turnips, artichokes, or carr...
-186. Vermicelli
Put a quart of clear stock into a stewpan upon the fire, and when boiling add two ounces of vermicelli; boil gently ten minutes, and it is ready to serve. ...
-187. Italian Paste
Procure some small Italian paste, in stars, rings, or any other shape, but small; put on a quart of stock, and when boiling, add two ounces of the paste; boil twenty minutes, or rather more, when it i...
-188. Semoulina
When the stock is boiling, add two tablespoonfuls of semoulina; boil twenty minutes, and it is then done. Proceed the same also with tapioca and sago. ...
-189. Macaroni
Boil a quarter of a pound of macaroni, in a quart of water, for ten minutes, then strain it off, and throw it into two quarts of boiling stock; let simmer gently for half an hour, when serve, with gra...
-190. Rice
Well wash two ounces of the best rice, strain off the water, put the rice into a stewpan, with a quart of cold stock, place it upon the fire, and let simmer about half an hour, until the rice is very ...
-191. Mutton Broth
Any description of trimmings of mutton may be used for broth, but the scrag ends of the neck are usually chosen; put two scrags into a stewpan (having previously jointed the bones), with three onions,...
-192. Irish Soup Made Of Mutton Broth
This soup is made similar to the last, adding ten or twelve mealy potatoes, cut into large dice, omitting the other vegetables, which, being boiled to a puree, thickens the broth; just before serving,...
-193. Scotch Cock-A-Leekie
Trim two or three bunches of fine winter leeks, cutting off the roots and part of the heads, then split each in halves lengthwise, and each half into three, which wash well in two or three waters, the...
-194. Ox-Tail Soup
Cut up two ox-tails, separating them at the joints, put a small piece of butter at the bottom of a stewpan, then put in the ox-tails, with a carrot, a turnip, three onions, a head of celery, a leek, a...
-195. Ox-Cheek Soup
Blanch in boiling water two ox-cheeks, cut off the beard, take away all the bone, which chop up, and cut the flesh into middling-sized pieces, leaving the cheek-part whole; put all together into a ste...
-196. White Mock-Turtle Soup
Procure half a calf's head (scalded, not skinned), bone it, then cut up a knuckle of veal, which put into a stewpan, well buttered at the bottom, with half a pound of lean ham, an ounce of salt, a car...
-197. Brown Mock-Turtle
Proceed the same as in the last article, only coloring the stock by drawing it down to a brown glaze, likewise adding half a pint of brown gravy (No. 177), omitting the cream, and adding two glasses o...
-198. Mulligatawny Soup
up a knuckle of veal, which put into a stewpan, with a piece of butter, half a pound of lean ham, a carrot, a turnip, three onions, and six apples, add half a pint of water; set the stewpan over a sha...
-199. Giblet Soup
Clean two sets of giblets, which soak for two hours, cut them into equal sizes, and put them into a stewpan, with a quarter of a pound of butter, four pounds of veal or beef, half a pound of ham, a ca...
-200. Oyster Soup
Put four dozen of oysters into a stew-pan with their liquor, place them upon the fire, when upon the point of boiling, drain them upon a sieve, catching the liquor in a basin; take off the beards, whi...
-201. The Fisherman's Soup
Put a quarter of a pound of butter into a stewpan, and when melted add six ounces of flour, stir well together over a slow fire a few minutes, when cool, add one quart of milk, and two quarts of stock...
-202. Autumn Soup
Cut up four cabbage-lettuces, one cos ditto, a handful of sorrel, and a little tarragon and chervil, when well washed and drained, put them into a stewpan, with two cucumbers finely sliced, and two ou...
-203. Hodge Podge
Cut two pounds of fresh scrag of mutton into small pieces, which put into a stewpan, with three quarts of cold water and a tablespoonful of salt, set it upon the fire, and when boiling place it at the...
-204. French Cabbage Soup
This is a soup very much in vogue amongst the middle classes of the French people ; it is very economical, and may satisfy a numerous family at a trifling expense. Put a gallon of water into a saucepa...
-205. Puree Of Vegetable Soup
Peel and cut up very finely three onions, three turnips, one carrot, and four potatoes, which put into a stewpan, with a quarter of a pound of butter, the same of lean ham, and a bunch of parsley; pas...
-206. Palestine Soup, Or Puree Of Artichokes
Have a quarter of a pound of lean bacon or ham, as also an onion, a turnip, and a little celery, cut the whole into small thin slices, and put them into a stewpan, with two ounces of butter ; place th...
-207. Puree Of Cauliflower Soup
Proceed as described for the puree of artichokes, but omitting the artichokes, and substituting four middling-sized cauliflowers, previously boiled and chopped fine. A puree of turnips is likewise ...
-208. Crecy Soup, Or Puree Of Carrots
Procure five or six large carrots, as red as possible, which well scrape, then shave them into very thin slices, taking off all the exterior red, but not using the centre, then peel and slice a large ...
-209. Green Pea Soup
Put two quarts of green peas into a stewpan with a quarter of a pound of butter, a quarter of a pound of lean ham, cut into small dice, two onions in slices, and a few sprigs of parsley; add a quart o...
-210. Winter Pea Soup
Wash a quart of split peas, which put into a stewpan, with half a pound of streaky bacon, two onions in slices, two pounds of veal or beef, cut into small pieces, and a little parsley, thyme, and bay-...
-211. Lentil Soup
Cut three onions, a turnip, and the half of a carrot into very thin slices, which put into a stewpan, with a quarter of a pound of butter, a few sprigs of parsley, a sprig of thyme, and two bay-leaves...
-212. Maigre Soup
Cut two onions into very small dice, and put them into a stewpan, with two ounces of butter; fry them a short time, but not to discolor them; have ready three or four handfuls of well-washed sorrel, w...
-213. Onion Soup Maigre
Peel and cut six large onions into small dice, put them into a stewpan, with a quarter of a pound of butter, place them over the fire until well fried, when well mix in a tablespoonful of flour, and r...
-214. Hare Soup
Put half a pound of butter into a stew-pan, and, when melted, add three quarters of a pound of flour, and half a pound of streaky bacon, cut into very small pieces; keep stirring over the fire until b...
-215. French Pot-Au-Feu
Out of this earthen pot comes the favorite soup and ]bouilli, which has been everlastingly famed as having been the support of many generations of all classes of society in France; from the opulent to...
-Crab Soup
We add to the list of M. Soyer's soups, a receipt for a purely American soup, a great favorite at the South, and esteemed a great luxury by those who have eaten of it. - Ed. [Open and cleanse twel...
-Fish
Of all aliments that have been given to the human race for nourishment, none are more abundant or more easy of procuring than this antediluvian species, and yet of how few do we make use, and how slig...
-216. Salmon, Plain Boiled
I prefer always dressing this fish in slices from an inch to two inches in thickness, boiling it in plenty of salt water about twenty minutes; the whole fish may be boiled, or the head and shoulders o...
-217. Salmon, Sauce Matelote
Cook three good slices of salmon as directed in the last, or a large salmon peal trussed in the form of the letter S, dress it upon a dish without a napkin, having previously drained off all the water...
-Cod
This fish, like the former, belongs to the northern parts of the world; its flavor and quality, like terrestrial animals, depend greatly on its feeding-place, a few miles making a marked difference; i...
-218. How To Boil Cod Fish
Crimped cod, as I have before remarked, is preferable to the plain; it is likewise better cut in slices than cooked whole; to boil it well, have the water ready boiling, with one pound of salt to ever...
-219. Cod Fish Sauced Over With Oyster Sauce
Boil three slices of the fish as above, drain and dress them upon a dish without a napkin, blanch three dozen oysters, by putting them into a stewpan, with their juice, upon the fire, move them round ...
-220. Salt Fish
Choose the fish with a black skin, and be particular in soaking it well; to boil, put it into a fish-kettle, with plenty of cold water, place it over the fire, and the moment it boils remove it to the...
-221. Haddock
This is a fish which I can highly recommend, both for its firmness and lightness; it is excellent plain boiled, and served with a cream sauce or any other fish sauce. But the better plan is to cut fou...
-222. Baked Haddock
Fill the interior of the fish with veal stuffing, sew it up with packthread, and truss it with the tail in its mouth, rub a piece of butter over the back, or egg and bread-crumb it over, set it on a b...
-223. Economical Mode Of Cooking Sturgeon
Take a piece of sturgeon about two pounds weight, and on sending a piece of meat to the baker's to be baked on a stand in a dish, put the sturgeon under it, with a little water, salt, pepper, etc, and...
-224. How To Roast Sturgeon
Take the tail part, skin and bone it; fill the part where the bone comes from with some stuffing, as for a fillet of veal; put butter and paper round it, and tie it up like a fillet of veal; roast, an...
-Mackerel
This is generally recognized as the scomber of the Romans, by whom it was much esteemed; at the present day it is not held in that high estimation that it was some years since: the great supply which ...
-226. Mackerel A La Mai'Tre D'Hotel
Cut an incision down the back of a mackerel, close to the bone, season it with a little pepper, salt, and cayenne, if approved of, butter the skin well, and place the fish upon a gridiron over a moder...
-227. Mackerel Au Beurre Noir
Split the mackerel open at the back, making it quite flat, season with a little pepper and salt, and butter it all over, lay it upon a gridiron over a moderate fire, turning it when half done, for abo...
-228. How To Stew Mackerel
Take off the heads, the fins, and tails, and, having opened the fish and taken out all the hard roes, dry them with a cloth and dredge them lightly with flour; place three or four of them in a stewpan...
-229. Fried Whiting
The whiting is generally skinned, and the tail turned round and fixed into the mouth; dip it first into flour, then egg over and dip it into bread-crumbs, fry as directed for the sole; for whiting aux...
-230. Whiting Au Gratin
Put a good spoonful of chopped onions upon a strong earthen dish, with a glass of wine, season the whiting with a little pepper and salt, put it in the dish, sprinkle some chopped parsley and chopped ...
-231. Red Mullets
Procure two red mullets, which place upon a strong dish, not too large, sprinkle a little chopped onions, parsley, a little pepper and salt, and a little salad-oil over, and put them into a warm oven ...
-232. Bed Mullet En Papillote
Cut a sheet of foolscap paper in the form of a heart, lay it on the table and oil it, put the mullet on one side, season with salt, pepper, and chopped eschalot, fold the paper over and plait both edg...
-233. Red Mullets Saute In Butter
Put two ounces of butter in a pan; when melted, put in one or two small mullets, and season with a teaspoonful of salt, half ditto of pepper, and the juice of half a lemon; set it on a slow fire and t...
-234. Herrings Boiled
Boil six herrings about twenty minutes in plenty of salt and water, but only just to simmer; then have ready the following sauce: put half a gill of cream upon the fire in a stewpan; when it boils, ad...
-235. Herrings Broiled, Sauce Dijon
The delicacy of these fish prevents their being dressed in any other way than boiled or broiled; they certainly can be bread-crumbed and fried, but scarcely any person would like them; I prefer them d...
-Smelts
Many have confounded them with the salmon-fry or smelt of one year old, whereas the smelt has roe and the fry none; it ascends rivers to deposit its spawn in November, December, and January, and the r...
-White Bait
This is a fish which belongs especially to London; although it is obtainable in other rivers in Great Britain and the Continent, yet it is not sought for; great difference of opinion exists amongst na...
-237. White Bait
Put them in a cloth, which shake gently so as to dry them ; then place them in some very fine bread-crumbs and flour mixed; toss them lightly with the hands, take them out immediately and put them in ...
-238. Turbot
To cook it; cut an incision in the back, rub it well with a good handful of salt, and then with the juice of a lemon; set it in a turbot kettle, well covered with cold water, in which you have put a g...
-239. Turbot, The New French Fashion
Boil your turbot as in the last, but dress it upon a dish without a napkin, sauce over with a thick caper sauce (having made a border of small new potatoes), sprinkle a few capers over the fish, and s...
-241. Soles Fried
Have about four pounds of lard or clean fat in a small fish-kettle, which place over a moderate fire, then cut off the fins of the sole, and dip it into flour, shake part of the flour off, have an egg...
-242. Soles, Saute In Oil
Trim the fish well, dip it into a couple of eggs, well beaten, put six tablespoonfuls of salad-oil in a saute-pan, place it over the fire, and when quite hot put in your sole, let it remain five minut...
-243. Sole A La Meuniere
Cut the fins off a sole, and make four incisions across it upon each side with a knife, then rub half a tablespoonful of salt and chopped onions well into it, dip in flour, and broil it over a slow fi...
-244. Soles Aux Fines Herbes
Put a spoonful of chopped eschalots into a saute-pan, with a glass of sherry and an ounce of butter, place the sole over, pour nearly half a pint of melted butter over it, or four spoonfuls of brown g...
-245. Flounders, Water Soucket
Procure four or six Thames flounders, trim and cut in halves; put half a pint of water in a sau'te-pan, with a little scraped horseradish, a little pepper, salt, sugar, and forty sprigs of fresh parsl...
-246. Skate
Procure two or three slices, tie them with string to keep the shape in boiling, put them into a kettle of boiling water, in which you have put a good handful of salt; boil gently about twenty minutes ...
-247. Skate Au Beurre Noir
Boil a piece of skate as directed in the last; when done, drain it well, put it upon a dish without a napkin, and proceed exactly as directed for mackerel au beurre noir. Skate may also be served u...
-Pike
This fish spawns in March and April, according to the season. When in perfection, their colors are very bright, being green, spotted with bright yellow, and the gills are a bright red; when out of sea...
-250. Baked Carp
Procure a good-sized carp, stuff it, then put it into a baking-dish, with two onions, one carrot, one turnip, one head of celery, and a good bouquet of parsley, thyme, and bay-leaf; moisten with two g...
-251. Carp, Sauce Matelote
Put your carp in a small oval fish-kettle, with wine and vegetables as in the last, to which add also a pint of water and a little salt, with a few cloves and peppercorns; put the lid upon the fish-ke...
-Trout
There are several kinds, none of which, it seems, were known to the Romans. This is the salmon of fresh water, and bears a very-close resemblance to it in flavor. They grow to a very large size; I par...
-Perch
Perch were known to the Romans, and those they received from Britain were considered the best. They do not grow to a very large size, four pounds being considered a large one. When fresh, are reddish ...
-Tench
256. Stewed Tench Put two onions, a carrot, and turnip, cut in slices, into a stewpan, or very small fish-kettle, with a good bouquet of parsley, a few sprigs of thyme, one bay-leaf, six cloves, a ...
-Eel
The Eel is greatly esteemed in all countries, but it differs in taste according to the river from whence it is taken; although we have some very fine eels in the river Thames, yet our principal supply...
-263. French Angler's Way Of Stewing Fish
Take about four pounds or less of all kinds of fish, that is, carp, pike, trout, tench, eels, etc, or any one of them, cut them into nice middle-sized pieces, no matter the size of the fish - let the ...
-Fish Sauces
In all ages and countries at all removed from barbarism, where fish has formed an article of diet, sauces of various kinds have been an accompaniment. With the Romans, in the time of Lucullus, great c...
-264. Melted Butter
Put into a stewpan two ounces of butter, not too hard, also a good tablespoonful of flour, mix both well with a wooden spoon, without putting it on the fire; when forming a smooth paste, add to it a l...
-265. Anchovy Sauce
Make the same quantity of melted butter as in the last, but omit the salt, and add three good table-spoonfuls of essence of anchovies. ...
-266. Fennel Sauce
This is a sauce principally used for boiled mackerel. Make the same quantity of melted butter as in the last, to which add a good tablespoonful of chopped fennel ; it is usually served in a boat. 2...
-268. Shrimp Sauce
Make the same quantity of melted butter as before, to which add three tablespoonfuls of essence of shrimps, but omitting the salt; add half a pint of picked shrimps, and serve in a boat. If no essence...
-270. Caper Sauce
Put twelve tablespoonfuls of melted butter into a stewpan, place it on the fire, and when on the point of boiling, add two ounces of fresh butter and one table-spoonful of capers; shake the stewpan ro...
-271. Lobster Sauce
Put twelve tablespoonfuls of melted butter in a stewpan, cut up a small-sized lobster into dice, make a quarter of a pound of lobster butter with the spawn, as directed ; when the melted butter is upo...
-272. New And Economical Lobster Sauce
Should you require to use the solid flesh of a lobster for salad, or any other purpose, pound the soft part and shell together (in a mortar) very fine, which put into a stewpan, covered with a pint of...
-273. Lobster Sauce A La Creme
Cut a small lobster into slices the size of half-crown pieces, which put into a stewpan; pound the soft and white parts, with an ounce of butter, and rub it through a sieve; pour ten spoonfuls of melt...
-275. Beyrout Sauce
Put a tablespoonful of chopped onions into a stewpan, with one of Chili vinegar and one of common ditto, a pint of melted butter, four spoonfuls of brown gravy, two of mushroom catsup, and two of Harv...
-276. Oyster Sauce
Mix three ounces of butter in a stew-pan, with two ounces of flour, then blanch and beard three dozen oysters, put the oysters into another stewpan, add beards and liquor to the flour and butter, with...
-278. A Ptamer Method
Blanch three dozen of oysters, which again put into the stewpan, with their liquor (after having detached the beards), add six peppercorns and half a blade of mace; place them over the fire, and when ...
-279. Mussel Sauce
Proceed exactly the same as for oyster sauce, using only the liquor of the mussels (not the beards) instead of the oysters, and serving the mussels in the sauce; about four dozen would be sufficient. ...
-280. Cream Sauce
Put two yolks of eggs in the bottom of a stewpan, with the juice of a lemon, a quarter of a tea-spoonful of salt, a little white pepper, and a quarter of a pound of hard fresh butter; place the stewpa...
-281. Matelote Sauce
For about a pound-slice of salmon make the following quantity of sauce: peel thirty button onions, and put half a teaspoonful of sugar in a quart-size stewpan, place it over a sharp fire, and when mel...
-283. Lobster Butter
Procure half a lobster, quite full of spawn, which take out and pound well in a mortar; then add six ounces of fresh butter, mix well together, then rub it through a hair sieve, and put it in a cold p...
-284. Anchovy Butter
Take the bones from six anchovies, wash the fillets, and dry them upon a cloth, pound them well in a mortar, add six ounces of fresh butter, mix well together, and proceed as in the last. ...
-285. Mai'Tre D'Hotel Butter
Put a quarter of a pound of fresh butter upon a plate, with one good tablespoonful of chopped parsley, the juice of two lemons, half a teaspoonful of salt, and a quarter that quantity of white pepper;...
-Removes
These are dishes which remove the fish and soup, served upon large dishes, and placed at the top and bottom of the table; great care should be evinced in cooking them, as they are the piece de resist...
-Beef
All oxen should fast from twenty-four to forty-eight hours before being killed; when killed and skinned, they are opened and the inside cleaned; they are then hung up, and ought to be exposed to a dra...
-289. Ribs Of Beef Braised
Take four ribs, not too fat nor too thick, remove the chine-bone neatly, and four inches of the tips of the rib-bones, run with a larding-needle several pieces of fat bacon through the thick part, tri...
-290. Stewed Rump Of Beef
This is a very excellent and useful joint to be continually kept in a country-house, where you may be some distance from a butcher's, as, when hung up in a cool larder, it keeps good for a considerabl...
-291. Salt Round Of Beef
This magnificent joint is, in general, too large for small families, but occasionally it may be used; the following is, therefore, the best method of cooking it: having folded the fat round it, and fa...
-296. How To Boil A Pickled Ox Tongue
Put the tongue into a large stewpan containing two gallons of cold water, which set upon the fire until boiling, when draw it to the corner to simmer for three hours, if a tongue weighing about six po...
-297. How To Cook A Fresh Ox Tongue
Put a tongue in lukewarm water for twelve hours to disgorge, then trim the root and scrape the tongue quite clean; have ready twenty pieces of fat bacon two inches long and half an inch square, which ...
-298. Rump Steak Broiled
Procure a steak cut nice and even, of about half an inch in thickness (if well cut it will not require beating), which lay upon a gridiron over a sharp fire; have a good teaspoonful of salt, and half ...
-299. Fillet Of Veal
Choose it of the best quality. Procure a leg, saw off the knuckle, take out the bone in the centre of the fillet, and fill up the cavity with some stuffing made as directed (see Receipt), fold the udd...
-300. Loin Of Veal
One with plenty of fat and a good kidney, from which the chump and the rib-bone at the other end has been removed; fasten the flap over the kidney with a skewer, run a spit through lengthwise, commenc...
-302. Breast Of Veal Plain Roasted
Paper the joint, and roast for about one hour, and serve with gravy and melted butter ; it may be roasted with the sweetbread skewered to it. By taking the tendons off, stew them for entrees. ...
-303. Shoulder Of Veal
One weighing fourteen pounds will take about two hours and a half to three hours to roast or braise ; if roasted, the same sauce as for the loin (No. 300), and braise (No. 310). ...
-304. Neck Of Veal
Procure about eight pounds of a nice white neck of veal, containing six or seven chops; saw off under part of the chine-bone, so as to give it a nice square appearance, lard it thus: take about twelve...
-309. Knuckle of Veal
Knuckle of Veal is a very favorite dish of mine : I procure two of them, which I saw into three pieces each, and put into a stewpan, with a piece of streaked bacon two pounds in weight, four onions, a...
-310. Loin Of Veal Braised
This joint generally weighs from twelve to fourteen pounds when off a good calf; have the rib-bones carefully divided with a saw so as not to hurt the fillet, prepare the braising-pan, and proceed as ...
-311. Breast Of Veal Stuffed And Stewed
Take about eight pounds of the breast of veal, put your knife about half an inch under the skin, and open it about three parts of its width all the way down, then prepare some veal stuffing, and lay i...
-312. Shoulder Of Veal Stuffed And Stewed
This is a very awkward joint to carve to advantage, and equally so to cook; by the following plan, it goes further than any other, way. Take the joint and lay it with the skin-side downwards, with ...
-313. Coifs Head
Choose one thick and fat, but not too large; soak for ten minutes in lukewarm water, then well powder with rosin, have plenty of scalding water ready, dip in the head, holding it by the ear, scrape th...
-Letter No. XII
My dear Eloise, - Do not make any mistakes in the way you describe the above receipts, which might be made very ridiculous if wrongly explained. For example: I once had an old French Cookery Book in m...
-Mutton
The sheep, when killed, is generally divided into two, by cutting across about two ribs below the shoulder; these are called the fore and hind-quarters : the former contains the head, neck, breast, an...
-314. Haunch Of Mutton
Saw or break three inches from the knuckle-bone, remove all skin from the loin, put it on a spit, commencing at the knuckle, and bringing it out at the flap, avoiding the fillet of the loin; then cove...
-315. Saddle Of Mutton
The same rule in regard to choice appiles to this as to the haunch. Take off the skin, run a lark-spit through the spinal marrow-bone, which affix to a larger one with a holdfast at one end and string...
-317. Roast Leg Of Mutton
Choose the same as the haunch. One about eight pounds weight will take about one hour and a half to roast: run the spit in at the knuckle, and bring it out at the thigh-bone; roast it some little dist...
-318. Boiled Leg Of Mutton
This I prefer of the South-down breed, and ewe is equally as good as doe. Cut the end of the knuckle from the leg, put it into an oval pan, in which there is sufficient water to cover it, throw in abo...
-319. Leg Of Mutton A La Bretonne
Choose one about six pounds weight, peel four cloves of garlic, make an incision with the point of a knife in four different parts around the knuckle, and place the garlic in it, hang it up for a day ...
-321. Shoulder Of Mutton, Provincial Fashion
Roast a fine shoulder of mutton ; whilst roasting mince ten large onions very-fine, put them into a stewpan, with two tablespoonfuls of salad-oil, pass them ten minutes over a good fire, keeping it st...
-322. Loin Of Mutton
Take off the skin, separate the joints with a chopper; if a large size, cut the chine-bone with a saw, so as to allow it to be carved in smaller pieces, run a lark-spit from one extremity to the other...
-323. Leg Of Mutton Stewed With Vegetables
Have a good leg, beat it a little with a rolling-pin, make an incision in the knuckle, in which put two cloves of garlic, then put it into a stewpan, with a pound of lean bacon cut in eight pieces, se...
-324. Neck Of Mutton
This is a very recherche dish, if off a good-sized sheep, and well hung; it must be nicely trimmed, sawing the bones at the tips of the ribs, which detach from the meat, folding the flap over; saw off...
-325. Boiled Neck Of Mutton
Take one with little fat upon it, divide the chops, taking care not to cut the fillet, put it into a pan with cold water sufficient to cover it, place in it one ounce of salt, one onion, and a small b...
-326. Sheep's Head
Though this may be seen in every part of London inhabited by the working classes, and may be procured ready-cooked, I prefer always to prepare it at home, and very good it is. I choose a fine one, as ...
-Lamb
The same rules for cutting up should be observed as in the sheep. The fore-quarter consists of a shoulder, neck, and breast together ; if cut up, the shoulder and ribs. The hind-quarter is the leg and...
-328. Neck Of Lamb A La Jardiniere
Plain roast the neck, as you would that of mutton; dish it up with sauce, and, whilst it is roasting:, cut one middling-sized carrot in small dice, the same quantity of turnip, and thirty button onion...
-329. Saddle Of Lamb, Russian Fashion
Roast a small saddle of lamb, keeping it pale; having had it covered with paper, take ten good-sized boiled potatoes, mash them with about two ounces of butter, a teaspoonful of salt, a quarter ditto ...
-332. Boiled Leg Of Lamb With Spinach
Procure a very small leg, and cut the end of the knuckle-bone, tie it up in a cloth and place it in cold water, with two ounces of salt in it, boil it gently according to size; when done, remove the c...
-333. Shoulder Of Lamb Braised
Take the blade bone from a shoulder of lamb, and have ready ten long strips of fat bacon, which season rather highly, with pepper, salt, and a tea-spoonful of chopped parsley, place the pieces, one af...
-334. Breast Of Lamb Broiled
Saw off the breast from a rib of lamb, leaving the neck of sufficient size to roast or for cutlets; then put two onions, half a carrot, and the same of turnip, cut into thin slices, in a stewpan with ...
-336. Lamb's Fry
Take about a pound and boil for ten minutes in half a gallon of water, take it out and dry on a cloth ; have some fresh crumbs, mix with them half a spoonful of chopped parsley, salt, pepper; egg the ...
-335. Lamb's Head
See Sheep's Head (No. 324). This will take half the time to cook. 337. Lamb's Head With Hollandaise If you want it very white, make stock as for sheep's feet, put it to stew when done, lay on di...
-Pork
The flesh of no other animal depends so much upon feeding as that of pork. The greatest care ought to be observed in feeding it, at least twenty-one days previous to its being killed; it should fast f...
-339. Leg Of Pork
Choose the pork as described at the commencement of this series, if a leg, one weighing about seven pounds; cut an incision in the knuckle near the thigh, into which put a quantity of sage and onions,...
-341. Sparerib Of Pork
When spitted, rub some flour over the rind, roast it before a clear fire, not too strong, or cover it with paper; about ten minutes before taking it up, throw some powdered sage over it, and froth it ...
-342. Loin Or Neck Of Pork A La Pie'Montaise
The neck or loin must be plain roasted; you have peeled and cut four onions in dice, put them into a stewpan, with two ounces of butter, stir over the fire until rather brown, then add a table-spoonfu...
-344. Bacon And Ham
Bacon-pigs are cut up differently for hams, bacon, etc, but a poleaxe should never be used for killing them, as it spoils the head. To be good, the fat must be firm, with a slight red tinge, the lean ...
-347. Sucking Pig
347. Sucking Pig is merely plain roasted, stuffed with veal stuffing, but before putting it upon the spit it requires to be floured and rubbed very dry, otherwise the skin would not eat crisp; the ...
-348. Hind Quarter Of Sucking Pig {Yorkshire Fashion)
Cut off the skin, cover with paper, and roast before a quick fire about three quarters of an hour; ten minutes before being ready, remove the paper and baste it; serve with gravy under, and mint sauce...
-349. Salt Pork
Pork is salted in the same manner as described for beef, omitting the sal-prunella, but of course not requiring so long a time; a leg weighing seven pounds would be well salted in a week, as also woul...
-350. Pig's Cheek (A New Method)
Procure a pig's cheek nicely pickled, boil well until it feels very tender, tie half a pint of split peas in a cloth, put them into a stewpan of boiling water, boil about half an hour, take them out, ...
-351. Pickled Pork (Belly Part)
Choose a nice streaky piece of about four pounds, it will take about three quarters of an hour boiling; serve, garnish with greens round it. 352. Hand Of Pork Choose one not too salt; boil it fo...
-353. Haunch Of Venison
Venison is cut up the same as mutton, with the exception of the saddle, which is seldom or never cut; the flesh should be dark, fine-grained and firm, and a good coating of fat on the back. It should ...
-Poultry
This is the best and most delicious of the various matters with which man furnishes himself as food; although containing but little nourishment, it gives a delightful variety to our repasts: from the ...
-Turkey
The flesh of this bird depends greatly upon its feeding; it might be made much more valuable for table if proper attention was paid to it. A young one should have his legs black and smooth and spurs s...
-355. Plain Roasted Turkey, With Sausages
This well-known dish, which has the joyous recollection of Christmas attached to it, and its well-known cognomen of ' an alderman in chains,' brings to our mind's eye the famed hospitality of this mig...
-356. Turkey With Flat Sausage Cake
Roast as before, fry thirty oval flat sausages (see Receipt), the same quantity of the same sized pieces of bacon, a quarter of an inch thick, make a border of mashed potatoes about the size of a fing...
-Boiled Turkey
This is a dish I rarely have, as I never could relish it boiled as it generally is, by putting it into that pure and chaste element water, into which has been thrown some salt, the quantity of which d...
-357. Boiled Braised Turkey
I truss it thus : Cut the neck, leaving the skin on; cut the legs off; then run the middle finger into the inside, raise the skin of the legs, and put them under the apron of the turkey, put the liver...
-358. Roast Braised Turkey
Peel and wash two onions, one carrot, one turnip, cut them in thin slices, also a little celery, a few sprigs of parsley, two bay-leaves, lay three sheets of paper on the table, spread your vegetables...
-359. Turkey, If Old
The French stew it exactly like the ribs of beef, the receipt of which you have; but as this is a large piece de resistance, I think I had better give it you in full as I do it:- Put a quarter of a ...
-360. Poulards, Capons, And Fowls
These are the best at nine and ten months old; if after twelve or fourteen, are only fit to be stewed like the turkey, No. 369, but in less time, or boiled in broth or sauces, but when young serve as ...
-361. Capon Or Poulard Roasted
Prepare it as you would a turkey, and it may be stuffed with the same kind of stuffing, tie over the breast a large slice of fat bacon, about a quarter of an inch thick, and two sheets of paper; ten m...
-364. Poulard With Rice
Having been braised as before, have a quarter of a pound of good rice washed, put in a stewpan, with a pint of broth, three spoonfuls of the capon's fat from the stewpan, a bouquet of parsley, let it ...
-365. Poulards Or Capons, With Quenelles And Tongue
When you are either roasting or braising, you make about twenty quenelles with table spoons, out of forcemeat of veal. Proceed and cook the same; when done, make a roll of mashed potatoes, which put r...
-367. Capon With Young Carrots
Scrape two bunches of young carrots, keep them in their original shape as much as possible, wash them and dry on a cloth, put them into a stewpan with two ounces of butter, a little sugar, salt, and p...
-368. Fowls, Italian Way
Prepare and cook the fowls as above, or re-warm some that may be left, cut the remains of a tongue into pieces one inch long and one quarter in thickness, cut three times the quantity of plain boiled ...
-369. Fowl A L'Ecarlate
Roast and braise two nice fowls, and boil a fine salted tongue, which trim so as to be able to stand it in a dish, when place it in the middle in a slanting position, place two fine heads of cauliflow...
-Geese
We have now arrived at your favorite dish, or, as your better half said on your return home from this, What is better than a goose stuffed with sage and onion ? Of course many persons are of his id...
-370. How To Truss Goose
Having well picked the goose, cut the feet off at the joint, and the pinion at the first joint; cut off the neck close to the back, leaving all the skin you can; pull out the throat, and tie a knot at...
-371. Roast Goose
Peel and cut in rather small dice six middle-sized onions, put in a pan, with two ounces of butter, half a teaspoonful of salt, a quarter ditto of pepper, a little grated nutmeg and sugar, six leaves ...
-374. Goose Stewed
If an old one, stew it with vegetables, as duck (No. 378), only give it more time to cook. On the Continent they are dressed in different ways, but which are too complicated for both our kitchens. ...
-375. Ragout Of Goose Giblets, Or Of Turkey
Put them into half a gallon of warm water to disgorge for a few hours, then dry them on a cloth, cut into pieces not too small, put into a stewpan a quarter of a pound of good lean bacon, with two oun...
-376. Preserved Goose For The Farm Or Country House
In case you have more geese in condition and season than what you consume, kill and cut them up into pieces, so that there shall be as little flesh left on the carcase as possible, and bone the leg; r...
-Ducks
There are several varieties of this bird, all, however, originating from the mallard There has not been that care and attention paid to this bird as to the fowl; but I think it is well worthy the atte...
-377. Ducks Roasted
Prepare them for the spit (that is, the same as geese, only leave the fat on), and stuff them with sage, onion, and bread-crumbs, prepared as for the goose, roast before a very quick fire, and serve ...
-378. Stewed Duck And Peas
Procure a duck trussed with the legs turned inside, which put into a stewpan with two ounces of butter and a quarter of a pound of streaked bacon let remain over a fire, stirring occasionally until li...
-380. Ducks A L'Aubergiste (Or Tavern-Keepers' Fashion)
Truss one or two ducks with the legs turned inside, put them into a stewpan with a quarter of a pound of butter; place them over a slow fire, turning round occasionally, until they have taken a nice b...
-Entrees Or Made Dishes
Entrees are, in common terms, what are called made-dishes; of course, these are dishes upon which, in the high class of cookery, the talent of the cook is displayed. Great care should be observed in d...
-382. Miroton Of Beef
Peel and cut into thin slices two large onions, put them in a stewpan or saucepan, with two ounces of salt butter, place it over a slow fire, keeping the onions stirred round with a wooden spoon until...
-386. Beef Palates
Although this is an article very seldom used in small families, they are very much to be commended; they may be dressed in various ways, and are not expensive, about four would be sufficient for a dis...
-390. Ox-Tails A La Jardinie'Re
Cut and cook two ox-tails as directed for soup, but just before they are done, skim well, and take out the pieces of tails, which put upon a dish, then in another stewpan put two ounces of butter, to ...
-391. Ox-Tails Au Gratin
Cook two ox-tails as before, and when cold, dry them upon a cloth, season with pepper and salt, have a couple of eggs well beaten upon a plate, into which dip each piece singly, afterwards throwing th...
-392. Ox-Tails, Sauce Piquante
Cook the tails as before, and when done dress them upon your dish pyramidically, then make about a pint of sharp sauce, No. 135, but omitting half the quantity of vinegar, and reducing it until rather...
-394. Potato Sandwiches
Saute the slices of beef as directed for bubble and squeak, cover one side of each piece with mashed potatoes a quarter of an inch in thickness, egg and bread-crumb over, then proceed the same with th...
-395. Bubble And Squeak
I am certain you must know, as well as myself, of our hereditary dish called bubble and squeak; but, like the preparation of other things, there is a good way and a bad; and, as you prefer the former ...
-396. Stewed Beef Or Rump Steak
Have a steak weighing two pounds, and an inch and a half in thickness, then put two ounces of butter at the bottom of a stewpan, when melted lay in the steak, with a quarter of a pound of lean bacon c...
-398. Beef A-La-Mode
Procure a small piece of rump, sir-loin, or ribs of beef, about twelve pounds in weight, take away all the bone, and lard the meat through with ten long pieces of fat bacon, then put it into a long ea...
-400. Fillet Of Beef
Procure a piece of fillet of beef weighing about two or three pounds, which may be obtained at any butcher's, being cut from underneath the rump; trim off part of the fat, so as to round the fillet, w...
-403. Minced Beef
Cut a pound and a half of lean cooked beef into very small dice, which put upon a plate; in a stew-pan put a good teaspoonful of finely-chopped onions, with a piece of butter of the size of a walnut, ...
-404. Croquettes Of Beef
Proceed precisely as in the last, but omitting the vinegar; when done, stir in two yolks of eggs quickly, stir another minute over the fire, then pour it upon a dish until cold; have a couple of eggs ...
-405. A Family French Salad For The Summer
I can assure you that, when in France during the hot weather, I used to enjoy the following salads immensely, having them usually twice a week for my dinner; they are not only wholesome, but cheap and...
-406. Potatoes And Meat Salad
Proceed as in the last, but omitting the lettuce; if any cold potatoes remain from a previous dinner, peel and cut them in halves if small, but in quarters if large, and then into pieces the size of a...
-407. Ox-Kidneys
Cut a nice fresh ox-kidney into slices, each being about the size of a half-crown piece, but double the thickness (avoiding the white part, or root, which is tough and indigestible), then put a quarte...
-409. Remains Of Ox-Tongue
The remains of a tongue from a previous dinner may be again served thus: - Cut it into thin slices, put a small piece of butter into a frying-pan, lay the pieces of tongue over, which warm a few minut...
-Fricandeau Of Veal
This is a very favorite dish of mine. It is generally considered an expensive one, but the way in which I do it, it is not so; besides which, it gives a nice piece of veal at table, when a fillet woul...
-413. Fricandeau Bourgeoise, In Its Gravy
Cut as before from the fillet, cut the bacon the same as for the neck, and laid with about thirty large pieces, but in a slanting direction, leaving but little of the bacon to be seen, as the object i...
-414. Calf's Liver Sautee
Cut it into slices, put a little butter in the saute- or frying-pan, when melted, lay the liver in season with salt, pepper, a teaspoonful of chopped eschalot, parsley, and grated nutmeg, saute on a s...
-417. Calf's Heart, Roasted
Proceed exactly the same as for ox's heart, only this being more delicate and smaller requires less time to roast, from half an hour to one hour, depending on the size; they may also be cut in slices ...
-418. Roast Sweetbreads
Take the sweetbreads and lay them in water at blood-heat, to disgorge, for three to four hours; then blanch them for two minutes in boiling water, put them into a stewpan with a few slices of carrot, ...
-419. Sweetbreads Saute
Blanch two throat-sweetbreads as in the preceding receipt, cut them in slices, put some butter in a frying-pan, and melt; then put in the sweet-bread, season over with salt, pepper, juice of a lemon, ...
-422. Veal Cutlets Aux Fines Heroes
Cut from the neck the same as you would from mutton, only of course larger; sprinkle with salt, pepper, and chopped eschalot, set them on a gridiron and broil like common chops, serve plain, or rub a ...
-423. Veal Cutlets En Papillote
Prepare as the last, and put them in a pie-dish and pour the sauce over, and let them remain until cold; then cut a sheet of foolscap paper in the shape of a heart, and oil or butter it; lay one of th...
-424. Calf's Ears Stewed
If you make mock turtle with half a calf's head, you may serve the ear; after having boiled the head as for mock turtle, cut out the ear (it should weigh about half a pound), lay it down on a board an...
-425. Made Dish From Joints That Have Been Previously Served
(If from braised veal, with vegetables.) Cut it into slices about a quarter of an inch in thickness, then put the remainder, vegetables and gravy, if any, in a pan; if not, with water and a piece of g...
-426. Calf's Brains Fried
Prepare them as for calfs head ; cut them in pieces of about two inches square, dip them into batter, and fry them immersed in fat; serve with fried parsley. ...
-427. Calf's Brains A La Mai'Tre D'Hotel
Prepare the brain as before, warm six spoonfuls of melted butter; when hot, add one ounce of mai'tre d' hotel butter, and, when melted, pour it over. ...
-428. Stewed Calf's Liver
Choose a nice fat one rather white in color, lard it through with bacon, put one quarter of a pound of butter in a pan, when melted add a tablespoonful of flour, keep stirring until a nice yellow colo...
-429. Sheep's Brains
Proceed as for calf's brains: these being smaller do not require so long to cook; though very good, they are not so delicate as calf's brains. ...
-430. Sheep's Kidneys
For a small dish procure six fresh ones, take off the thin skin which covers them, and cut them into slices, put in a saut'e-pan one ounce of butter, when melted and nearly brown, add the kidneys, wit...
-431. Sheep's Feet Or Trotters
Previous to visiting the Continent, I had quite a dislike to the unfortunate Pied de Mouton, whose blackish appearance in stall and basket seemed to be intended to satisfy the ravenous appetites of th...
-432. French Ragout Of Mutton
Take about two pounds of the scrag of the neck, breast, chump, or any other part, with as little fat as possible, cut it into pieces of about two inches square, put into a pan two ounces of butter, or...
-433. Irish Stew
Cut up about two pounds of the neck of the mutton into small cutlets, which put into a proper sized stewpan with some of the fat of the mutton, season with three spoonfuls of salt, half an ounce of pe...
-Letter No. XIII
Dearest Eloise, - I certainly here must avail myself of M. Soyer's kind permission by taking from his 'Gastronomic Regenerator' a very simple receipt, it is true, but one which, in my estimation, has ...
-434. Soyer's New Mutton Chop
Trim a middling-sized saddle of mutton, which cut into chops half an inch in thickness with a saw, without at all making use of a knife (the sawing them off jagging the meat and causing them to eat mo...
-Letter No. XIV
Dear Houtense, - Yours of last night was received at our supper-table, which was surrounded by a few of our best friends, and I need not tell you the merriment it has created respecting your fantastic...
-435. Mutton Cutlets
Trim a neck of mutton by cutting away the scrag and sawing off three inches of the rib-bone, then cut about ten cutlets out of the neck, shape them by chopping off the thick part of the chine-bone, be...
-436. Cutlets With Mushrooms
If for ten or twelve cutlets take about twenty fresh mushrooms, cut off the tails, wash them, and dry on a cloth, put two pats of butter in a stewpan, half a gill of water, the juice of a lemon, a lit...
-437. Cutlets A La Mai'Tre D'Hotel
When the cutlets are done, dish them up, put two ounces of mai'tre d' hotel butter in a clean saute-pan, keep it moving until melted : put two spoonfuls of cream when very hot, pour over, and serve wi...
-439. Sheep's Tongue, Demi-Glaze
For one dish, take six, put them in water to disgorge, then dry them, put them in a stewpan with two onions, half a large carrot, a bouquet of two bay-leaves, one sprig of thyme, a quart of broth if h...
-440. Sheep's Hearts
Proceed exactly as with the calf's heart, only diminish the time of cooking in proportion to the size, about thirty minutes will be sufficient; serve with any kind of sharp sauce or any ragout of vege...
-441. Mince Lamb
(See Veal.) Serve with poached eggs over. ...
-442. Remains Of Roast Or Boiled Lamb With Peas
Cut up about two pounds, bones included, in rather small pieces, put into a convenient-sized stewpan, add to it two teaspoonfuls of flour, one of chopped onions, one of salt, a quarter ditto of pepper...
-444. Lamb's Heart
Six will make a nice dish; stuff like calf's heart, only adding to it some bits of ham or red tongue; stew and serve with any kind of sauce. ...
-445. Lamb Cutlets
Ten cutlets would be sufficient for a dish, and might be cut from one neck, as described for mutton cutlets (page 182), but leaving them as large as possible; that is, about one third less than the mu...
-446. Lamb Chops
Select a fine loin of lamb with the kidney in it, trim off the flap, and with a very sharp knife cut your chops from half to three quarters of an inch in thickness, cutting about eight chops from the ...
-449. Pork Cutlets
Choose a small neck, cut eight cutlets out of it of the same shape as the mutton, only leaving a little more fat on it, season, egg and bread-crumb, fry in pan, serve with either sauces Robert, poiver...
-450. Pork Cutlets With Pickle
Saute, broil or fry, the chops, as in the preceding; make about a gill of melted butter, add to it two tablespoonfuls of liquor of piccalilly, and six or eight pieces of the pickle cut small; when ver...
-451. Pork Cutlets Saute
Cut six or eight good-sized cut-lets from the neck of the same shape as the mutton, lay them in a buttered saute-pan, season well with pepper and salt, place over the fire; when done lay them upon a p...
-452. Pork Cutlets Aux Cornichons
Cut six or eight cut-lets from a middling-sized neck of pork, season well with pepper and salt, dip in eggs well beaten upon a plate, and then into grated crust of bread (not too brown) put two ounces...
-453. Pork Cutlets Sauce Demi-Robert
Cut eight cutlets from a neck as before, season well with pepper and salt, sprinkle chopped onions and parsley over upon both sides, beating the cutlets lightly to make them adhere, then dip them into...
-454. Excellent Sausage Cakes
Chop some lean pork very fine, having previously detached all the skin and bone, and to every pound of meat add three quarters of a pound of fat bacon, half an ounce of salt, a saltspoonful of pepper,...
-455. Pigs' Feet
Procure six pigs' feet nicely salted, which boil in water, to which you have added a few vegetables, until well done, cut each one in halves, take out the long bone, have some sausage-meat as in the l...
-456. Pig's Kidneys
Cut them open lengthwise, season well with pepper and salt, egg over with a paste-brush, dip into bread-crumbs, with which you have mixed some chopped parsley and eschalot, run a skewer through to kee...
-457. Hashed Pork
Put two spoonfuls of chopped onions into a stewpan with a wineglassful of vinegar, two cloves, a blade of mace, and a bay-leaf, reduce to half, take out the spice and bay-leaf, add half a pint of brot...
-458. Fritadella (Twenty Receipts In One)
Put half a pound of crumb of bread to soak in a pint of cold water, take the same quantity of any kind of roast or boiled meat, with a little fat, chop it up like sausage meat, then put your bread in ...
-459. Ramifolle
These are a little more expensive than the fritadella, and worthy the table of a crowned head. The flesh of fowls instead of lamb or veal, with the addition of one or two fat livers cut in dice. Proce...
-460. Prussian Cutlets
Take a piece of veal, say one pound, from any part of the calf, as long as you extract the nerve, with a little fat, chop it up, but not too fine, add to it two tea-spoonfuls of chopped eschalot, one ...
-461. Cutlets A La Victime, Or Victimized Cutlets
Here, ma belle amie, is a terrific title for a receipt, but do not fear it, as the time of the Inquisition is past, and you are not likely to become one in par-taking of it. I do not recommend it to y...
-462. Roast And Braised Chicken, For Entrees
Have a chicken trussed for boiling; put it on a spit, envelop it as for turkey (No. 358), roast half the time or little less, depending on the fire and the size of the chicken; when done, remove it fr...
-463. Braised Chicken
If not convenient to roast, put a little bacon in a stewpan, then a chicken, a large onion, half a carrot, half a head of celery, two bay-leaves, two cloves, one peppercorn, one and a half tablespoonf...
-464. Chicken Plain Boiled
Put two quarts of water into a stewpan, on the fire, or two ounces of butter, and a tablespoon-ful of salt and a few vegetables ; when boiling, rub the breast of the chicken with half, a lemon, and pu...
-465. Poultry En Capilotade
Put with the pieces of fowl a tablespoonful of oil, and one glass of sherry, into a pan, and proceed as above; when ready to serve, chop a few gherkins, and put in. ...
-467. Fried Fowl
When you have cut the pieces as before, put them into a basin with a little salt, pepper, a spoonful of oil, and two of vinegar, and a little chopped eschalot, stir them well in it, and let remain for...
-468. Blanquette Of Fowl
Put half a pint of white sauce in a stewpan, with six tablespoonfuls of broth or milk, let it boil, having cut up about a pound of the remains of any kind of poultry, put it in the sauce, warm it, and...
-471. Broiled Fowl, With Sauce
Have a fowl ready plucked and drawn, open the back from one end to the other with a sharp knife, having previously cut the feet off at the second joint, make an incision in the skin, and pass the bone...
-473. A La Tartare
By making about half a pint of the above sauce, and ornament an oval dish by placing on the border cut gherkins, beet-root, olives, place the sauce on it, and lay the fowl very hot over it; thus the f...
-474. Croquettes Of Fowl
Take the lean of the remains of a fowl from a previous dinner, and chop it up in small pieces, then put into a stewpan a teaspoonful of chopped eschalots with half an ounce of butter, pass them for ab...
-475. Fricassee Of Fowl
Divide a fowl into eight pieces, wash it well, put the pieces into a stewpan, and cover with boiling water, season with a teaspoonful of salt, a little pepper, a good bouquet of parsley, four cloves, ...
-476. Fowl Saute
Pluck and draw a fowl, cut it into pieces, seven or eight, as you like, that is, the two French wings, the two legs, the breast in one or two pieces, and the back in two; trim nicely, put into a saute...
-479. Blanquettes Of Turkey
Cut off the flesh from the remainder of a roast or boiled turkey into as large slices as possible, then break up the bones, which put into a stewpan, with a little lean bacon and an onion, and a small...
-480. Boudins Of Fowl Or Turkey
Cut up the remains of a turkey or fowls into very small dice, with a quarter of a pound of lean cooked ham to each pound of meat, make a stock with the bones as directed in the last; put a teaspoonful...
-481. Turban Of Croquettes A L'Epigramme
Croquettes are made from the same preparation as the last, but made up into small pieces, two inches in length and the thickness of your finger; egg, bread-crumb, and fry the same, dress in a circle u...
-482. Hashed Goose
Put a spoonful of chopped onions into a stewpan with an ounce of butter, which fry over the fire until becoming rather browned, then stir a tablespoonful of flour, put in the remains of a goose, cut i...
-483. Stewed Duck With Peas
Truss a duck with the legs turned inside, which put into a stewpan with two ounces of butter and a quarter of a pound of streaked bacon, cut into small dice, set the stewpan over a moderate fire, occa...
-484. Stewed Duck With Turnips
Proceed as in the last, but, instead of peas, use about forty pieces of good turnips, cut into moderately-sized squares, and previously fried, of a yellowish color, in a little lard or butter, dress t...
-485. Fowl Saute In Oil
Cut a fowl into eight pieces, that is, the two wings, two legs, two pieces of the breast, and two of the back, which put into a stewpan, with three table-spoonfuls of salad-oil, over a moderate fire, ...
-486. Fricassee Of Rabbit
Cut a nice young rabbit into neat joints, and put them into lukewarm water to disgorge for half an hour, when drain and put them into a stewpan, with a large onion cut into slices, two cloves, a blade...
-487. Gibelotte Of Rabbit
Cut up a young rabbit into neat joints, as likewise a quarter of a pound of streaky bacon in small dice, put the bacon into a stewpan, with two ounces of butter, and when a little fried, put in the pi...
-488. Compote Of Pigeons
Put a quarter of a pound of lean bacon cut into small dice into a stewpan, with half an ounce of butter, and fry a few seconds over the fire, then have three pigeons trussed, with their legs turned in...
-490. Raised Hot Lamb Pie
To make this an oval, a tin or copper pie mould would be required, which you would choose of a size most generally useful. Butter the interior of the mould, which stand upon a baking-sheet, then make ...
-491. Other Various Pies
Hot raised pies may also be made with mutton by following the above directions. They are also very good made with fillet of beef cut into thin slices of the size of the lamb chops, or of rump steak, b...
-492. Rump Steak Pie
Procure two pounds of rumpsteaks, which cut into thinnish slices, and season well with pepper and salt, dip each piece into flour, and lay them in a small pie-dish, finishing the top in the form of a ...
-493. Veal And Ham Pie
Cut about a pound and a half of veal into thin slices, as also a quarter of a pound of cooked ham ; season the veal rather highly with white pepper and salt, with which cover the bottom of the dish, t...
-494. Mutton Pie
Procure the chumps of three loins of mutton, from which cut the meat in moderately thin slices, put a layer at the bottom of the dish, which season well with chopped parsley, eschalots, pepper, and sa...
-496. Lamb Pie
Cut a small neck of lamb into chops, which must not be too fat, season them lightly with pepper and salt, and lay them in your pie-dish, with a few new potatoes in slices, pour in a little water, then...
-497. Chicken Pie
Cut up a nice plump chicken into joints, which lay upon a dish, and season lightly with chopped parsley, white pepper, and salt, then lay the back, cut into three pieces, at the bottom of a pie-dish, ...
-498. Rabbit Pie
Cut a nice rabbit into joints, splitting the head in halves, and lay them in lukewarm water half an hour, to disgorge, then dry them upon a cloth, season well with pepper, salt, chopped eschalots, par...
-499. Pigeon Pie
Line the bottom of a pie-dish with a pound of rumpsteak, cut into slices not too thin, seasoned with a little salt, pepper, and cayenne, and dipped into flour; have ready picked and drawn a couple of ...
-500. Partridge Pie
Line the bottom of a pie-dish with slices of veal, cut moderately thick, and rather lightly seasoned with white pepper and salt; have ready picked, drawn, and trussed a couple of young partridges, pou...
-501. Grouse Pie
Roast, very underdone, a couple of nice plump grouse; when cold, cut into joints, being the two wings, two legs, and the breasts into two pieces each, season them lightly, and lay them in a pie-dish, ...
-502. Sea Pie
Put into a stewpan two pounds of beefsteak, season it with pepper and salt, a small bit of celery chopped up, or a pinch of ground celery seed, a pinch of pounded basil, a teaspoonful of chopped parsl...
-503. Eel Pie
Skin and cleanse three good-sized eels, which cut into pieces about two inches in length, put a good-sized bunch of parsley, thyme, and three bay-leaves, all tied together, into a stewpan, with an oni...
-504. Beefsteak Pudding
Put a pound of flour upon a dresser, with which mix half a pound of beef suet, very finely chopped, make a hole in the middle, into which put a teaspoonful of salt, and sufficient water to form a rath...
-505. Mutton Pudding
Line a pudding-basin with paste, as directed in the last; then have ready cut into slices the meat from two loin-chumps of mutton, which lay upon a dish, and season with a teaspoonful of chopped onion...
-506. Lamb Pudding
If convenient, procure the entire ribs of lamb, sawing off the breast almost close to the lean part of the neck; the breast may be cooked as directed (No. 334); cut the neck into rather thin cutlets, ...
-507. Veal Pudding
Cut two pounds of veal from any part of the leg into slices, about the size of the palm of the hand and a quarter of an inch in thickness, put two ounces of butter into a frying-pan, and when melted l...
-508. Pork Pudding
Line a pudding-basin with paste as before, and spread three quarters of a pound of sausage-meat of an equal thickness over the interior, have a pound and a half of lean pork, from the leg if possible,...
-509. Kidney Pudding
Procure one ox or eight mutton kidneys, which cut into slices the thickness of half-a-crown piece; lay them upon a dish, seasoning well with black pepper and salt, and shaking one ounce of flour over,...
-510. Rabbit Pudding
Cut a rabbit up in joints (splitting the head in halves), and lay them in a basin of lukewarm water an hour, to disgorge; line a pudding-basin with paste as directed for rumpsteak pudding, dry the pie...
-511. Suet Pudding
Put a pound of sifted flour in a basin, with half a pound of beef suet finely chopped, add two eggs, with a pinch of salt, and a quarter of a pint of water, beat well together with a wooden spoon, mak...
-512. Yorkshire Pudding
Put six tablespoonfuls of flour into a basin, with six eggs, a pinch of salt, and a quarter of a pint of milk, mix well together with a wooden spoon, adding the remaining three quarters of a pint of m...
-513. Toad In A Hole
Make a batter as directed for the Yorkshire pudding, but with the addition of a spoonful more flour and six ounces of chopped beef suet; butter a rather deep baking-dish, into which pour the batter, l...
-514. Pease Pudding
Tie a pint of split peas in a cloth, leaving them room to swell, but not more; put them into a stewpan of cold water, where let them boil nearly half an hour until tender, but not at all watery (which...
-515. Fowl Pillau
Put one pound of the best Patna rice into a frying-pan with two ounces of butter, which keep moving over a slow fire, until the rice is lightly browned; then have ready a fowl trussed as for boiling, ...
-516. Mutton Pillau
Trim a neck of mutton, by sawing off the tips of the ribs and taking away the chine-bone; then lay it in a stewpan, with a bag of spice as in the last, and cover with three quarts of stock, let it sim...
-517. Chicken Curry
Cut up a chicken into ten pieces, that is, two wings, two pieces of the breast, two of the back, and each leg divided into two pieces at the joints; then cut up a middling-sized onion into very small ...
-518. Chicken Curry With Paste
Cut a chicken up as described in the last, which put into a stewpan, with two ounces of clarified butter, put it over the fire, stirring occasionally until the pieces of the chicken are lightly browne...
-519. Rabbit Curry
Cut up a rabbit into smallish pieces, splitting the head in halves, cut up two large onions and one apple into very small dice, which fry in a stewpan with two ounces of butter; when nicely browned, a...
-520. Veal Curry
Cut up about two pounds of lean veal into small square pieces, half the size of walnuts, then put a large onion cut into small dice in a stewpan, with a clove of garlic and one apple cut into slices, ...
-521. Breast Of Veal Curry
Procure a piece of breast of veal about three pounds in weight, with the bones and tendons attached, which chop into about twenty square pieces, and put into a stewpan, with two quarts of water, and a...
-522. Breast Of Mutton Curry
Cut up a breast of mutton, bones and all, into pieces about two inches in length and one in width, which put into a stewpan with two quarts of water, to simmer for about two hours, when proceed precis...
-524. Lambs Head Curry
Procure a lambs head, which split in halves, break the bones at the nostrils, and put into lukewarm water an hour to disgorge, previously taking out the brains, which likewise disgorge in the water, t...
-526. Calf's Feet Curry
After boiling a set of feet for calf's feet jelly, the feet may be served in curry as follows : separate the meat from the bones whilst the feet are warm; when cold, cut them into small square pieces,...
-527. Calf's Tail Curry
Cut up calves' tails into joints, which put into a stewpan, with a small piece of lean ham and a bunch of parsley, thyme, and bay-leaf; cover them with three pints of cold water, and let simmer about ...
-529. Tripe Curry
Cut two large onions into very small dice, which put into a stewpan, with two ounces of butter, and stir over the fire until brown, when well mix in a tablespoonful of curry powder and half that quant...
-530. Lobster Curry
Procure a large boiled lobster, break the shell, and take out the flesh in as large pieces as possible, cutting the tail into about six pieces, and the claws of a proportionate size; then cut two onio...
-531. Crab Curry
Prepare the onions and curry precisely as in the last, but adding the flesh of a crab (broken small) instead of a lobster; let it stew over the fire about twenty minutes, add the juice of half a lemon...
-532. Oyster Curry
Blanch and beard six dozen of oysters, leaving the oysters in their own liquor; then cut two middling-sized onions into small dice, and saute it in a stewpan, with an ounce of butter; when done, mix i...
-533. Prawn Curry
Procure sufficient prawns to weigh about a pound; when picked, put half of a small onion chopped very fine into a stewpan, with half an ounce of butter, stir them over the fire until becoming rather y...
-534. Salmon Curry
Have two slices of salmon, weighing about a pound each, which cut into pieces of the size of walnuts, cut up two middling-sized onions, which put into a stewpan, with an ounce of butter and a clove of...
-535. Fillet Of Sole Curry
Fillet two nice soles, and cut each fillet into five pieces (slantwise); then in a stewpan have a small onion chopped fine and fried, to which add a table-spoonful of curry paste, or an equal quantity...
-536. Skate Curry
Plain boil about two pounds of skate with a piece of the liver, which put upon a dish without a napkin, previously well draining off the water; whilst the fish is boiling, cut two onions in slices, wh...
-538. Baked Eggs With Asparagus
Cut twenty heads of sprue into small pieces, keeping only the tender part, boil them for fifteen minutes, put them into a stewpan, with half an ounce of butter, set them on the fire for three minutes,...
-539. Mashed Eggs
Break four eggs into a stewpan, with one ounce of butter, half a teaspoonful of salt, and a pinch of pepper, put it on the fire, stir continually, and as soon as delicately set, serve. These can be...
-540. Eggs With Burnt Butter
Put into a frying-pan two ounces of butter, which melt; as soon as it is on the point of browning, put in the eggs, which have been previously broken in a basin, and seasoned with pepper and salt; whe...
-541. Eggs A La Tripe
Cut about two onions each into thin slices, put them in a stewpan, with half an ounce of fresh butter, and set them on a slow fire; when warmed through, put half a teaspoonful of salt, quarter ditto o...
-543. Eggs With Cheese
Put into a stewpan about two ounces of grated Parmesan, or Gruyere, or old Cheshire, with one ounce of butter, two sprigs of parsley, two spring onions chopped up, a little grated nutmeg, and half a g...
-544. Eggs In Cases
Cut up a sheet of paper into pieces of three inches square, turn up half an inch all around so as to form a kind of case, they will then remain but two inches square in the inside. Take a small piece ...
-545. Omelette With Herbs
Break six eggs in a basin or stewpan, and add to it a teaspoonful of chopped parsley, and one of chopped eschalot or spring onions, half ditto of salt, and a pinch of pepper, and beat it well up toget...
-546. Asparagus, Peas, And Green Peas
Putin a stewpan two spoonfuls of plain boiled sprue-grass that has previously been cut up, add to it half an ounce of butter, a little salt, pepper, and sugar, warm it on the fire, moving it continual...
-547. Oysters
Open and blanch delicately twelve middle-sized oysters, and put them in a stewpan with their own gravy, beard them, add a tablespoonful of milk or cream, and give it a boil, then add half an ounce of ...
-548. Lobster
Cut half or a small one in thin slices, put four tablespoonfuls of melted butter in a stewpan, a few drops of essence of anchovies, and a little cayenne; put in your lobster, warm it well, and put in ...
-550. Mushrooms
Wash about ten small fresh mushrooms, cut in slices, put in a stewpan, with half an ounce of butter, a little salt, pepper, and the juice of a quarter of a lemon, simmer for a few minutes on the fire ...
-551. Bacon
Cut two ounces of good lean bacon in small dice, put in pan to fry with the butter for one minute, then mix with the eggs prepared as for omelette of herbs, and cook the same way. ...
-552. Broiled Pheasant
Having drawn a pheasant, lay it upon its breast, and pass a knife down the back-bone, upon each side, taking it entirely out, then cut off the feet at the knuckle, break the leg and thigh-bones, turni...
-Game Curries
I have also made very good game curries, but not too hot with curry, as that would entirely destroy the flavor of the game. ...
-553. Pheasant Stewed With Cabbage
The following is an excellent method for dressing a pheasant which should prove to be rather old, although a young one would be preferable. Procure a large savoy, which cut into quarters, and well was...
-554. Joe Miller's Stewed Pheasant
Roast a pheasant as directed (No. 582), but previously dipping it into flour, and occasionally flour over whilst roasting, thus making the exterior very crisp, and keeping it nearly white, then put th...
-555. Hashed Pheasant
Should you have any remains of pheasants from a previous day, cut them into as neat pieces as possible, then put an ounce of butter into a stewpan, with half an ounce of flour, which stir two or three...
-556. A Plain Salmi Of Pheasant
Or, should you have a pheasant left that little has been cut from, cut and trim it into neat joints, which put into a stewpan, then in another stewpan put the bones and trimmings, chopped up very smal...
-557. Grouse
The Scotch method is to plain roast the grouse, dress it upon toast, and pour plain melted butter over. But they may be dressed in any of the ways directed for pheasants, with the exception of bein...
-558. Stewed Partridges With Cabbage
Have two nice partridges trussed as for boiling, and run five or six slices of fat bacon, of the thickness of a quill, lengthwise through the breast, but not to protrude, and roast them fifteen minute...
-559. Partridge Saute With Mushrooms
Have two young partridges, each of which cut in halves, and lay in a convenient-sized stewpan, into which you have previously poured two or three tablespoonfuls of salad oil, first seasoning them ligh...
-560. Woodcocks, A La Lucullus
Plain roast the woodcocks as directed in Roasts, catching their trails upon toast, upon which, when done, dress the birds on a dish; have ready a little thick melted butter, with which mix the yolk of...
-561. Woodcock, The Sportsman's Fashion
Roast two woodcocks rather underdone, catching their trails upon a large piece of toasted bread, when done cut each bird into quarters, which place in a stewpan, with the remainder of the trail cut sm...
-562. Hashed Woodcock
Should you have any remaining from a previous dinner, cut each one in four (or if not whole, into neat pieces), chop all the interior rather line, which mix with a small piece of butter, a spoonful of...
-563. Snipes A La Minute
Put a quarter of a pound of butter into a stewpan, over which lay six snipes, breasts downwards, add a spoonful of chopped onions, the same of chopped parsley, a little grated nutmeg, half a teaspoonf...
-564. Plovers Saute With English Truffles
Procure four plovers, which lay breasts downwards in a stewpan, containing a quarter of a pound of butter, to which add eight raw truffles, well washed, peeled, and cut into very thin slices, two clov...
-565. Wild Duck, With Orange Sauce
Having trussed your duck as for roasting, rub it all over with the liver until quite red ; then put it down before a good fire to roast for twenty minutes, after which cut eight incisions down the bre...
-566. Hashed Wild Duck
Cut up the remains of a duck or ducks into neat pieces, and put into a stewpan with half or a tablespoonful of flour (depending on the quantity), mix well, moisten with a glass or two of wine, and suf...
-567. Widgeons
Rub the breast of a widgeon over with a part of the liver, chop up the remaining part, to which add a few bread-crumbs, a little chopped lemon-peel, chopped pars-ley, and an egg, with which stuff the ...
-568. Teal, A New Method
Procure four, draw them; then put half a pound of butter upon a plate, with a little pepper, grated nutmeg, parsley, a spoonful of grated crust of bread, the juice of a lemon, and the liver of the tea...
-570. Larks A La Minute
Proceed as directed for snipes a la minute, previously stuffing them with their livers as directed for widgeons, adding a few mushrooms at the commencement; but do not let them stew too quickly, or th...
-572. Jugged Hare
Put a quarter of a pound of butter, with a pound of bacon cut into dice, and the hare, cut into pieces, in a stewpan: set upon a moderate fire until the pieces of hare are becoming firm, when add six ...
-Roasts-Second Course
These dishes consist almost always of game, which require to be sent up immediately they are taken from the fire, and require great care and attention in cooking them. In the following pages will be f...
-574. Turkey Poults
Turkey poults, so called from being used when about the size of a large pullet, are trussed with the legs turned at the knuckle and the feet pressing upon the thighs, the neck is skinned and the head ...
-575. Roast Capon With Cresses
Roast and serve a capon in any of the ways directed for turkeys, roast of a nice gold color, and serve with water-cresses round; a capon weighing five pounds requires about three quarters of an hour t...
-576. Roast Pullet
For a dinner of four entries you would require two fowls, but not too large; truss and roast them as directed for a turkey, judging the time required according to their size, and serve with gravy and ...
-578. Goslings
A green goose roasted plain, and served with a little gravy, is generally sent up for second courses ; but if the larger ones are used, they must be stuffed with sage and onions, but very few would ch...
-580. Guinea Fowls
These birds must be very young, for, being naturally very dry, they are not eatable if more than twelve months old; they are generally larded or barded, and served plain roasted, rather well done; the...
-581. Pea Fowls
These magnificent birds make a noble roast, and when young are very excellent; they are larded, plain roasted, and served with the tail stuck into the bird, which you have preserved, the head with its...
-Choice Of Game
There is no article of food that is so deceiving in appearance to know if it is young, tender, and good, or not, as game; to a person living in the country, where a member of the family has shot them ...
-582. Pheasants
At the present day there are great varieties of these birds, which differ as much in their flavor as their plumage. There are also a large quantity of hybrids sold in market as a genuine pheasant, and...
-583. Partridges
The red-legged in this country are not so fine in flavor as the gray; they are dressed like the pheasant, but all the time at a very quick fire, and serve very hot from the spit; it is better to wait ...
-584. Grouse
These birds should be well kept, trussed like a fowl for roasting, and served with brown gravy under, or may be dressed as follows: truss as before, covering the breast with vine leaves and fat bacon,...
-585. Red Grouse, Gorcock Or Moorcock - The Common Moor Game (Vattagas)
Trussed like a fowl for roasting, which cook quick before a sharp fire, serve with toasted bread under. ...
-586. White Grouse Or Ptarmigan (Le Lagopede)
They are to be trussed like the above, and plain roasted, and served with toast under and fried bread-crumbs, separate or dressed as follows:Put - two spoonfuls of currant-jelly in a stewpan, with the...
-587. Wild Ducks {Canard Sauvage)
The male is called the Mallard, and the young one Flapper. Under the above title a great many birds are sold. They should all be cooked alike; they must be kept two or three days before they are dr...
-588. Widgeon, Whewer, Or Whim (Le Canard Siffleur)
These should be eaten fresher than a Wild Duck, trussed, dressed, and served the same; fifteen minutes is sufficient before a good fire. 589. Dunbird, Pochard, Or Great-Headed Widgeon (Penelope, Le...
-590. Teal (La Petite Sarcelle)
This is a delicious bird when fat, which they generally are after a frost. They must be trussed with care like ducklings; they will take about eight minutes to roast; serve with gravy, water-cresses, ...
-591. Garganey (La Sarcelle)
These are called Summer Teal, resemble it in shape, and are dressed the same way. ...
-592. Plover
Of these there are several sorts, all of which are good to eat at certain seasons. They should be well kept, but not too long, trussed gently, but not drawn, and put on a skewer, place them a littl...
-593. - Woodcock (La Becasse)
This is a most delicious bird when well cooked ; they must not be kept too long; they are fit for cooking when they become black between the legs, and the feathers are rather loose; truss them with th...
-594. Snipes
They are dressed in every respect like Woodcocks ; and from seven to ten minutes is sufficient. They may likewise be fried in plenty of oil, and served with sauces Nos. 131, 143. ...
-595. Larks. L'Alouette
They are best in winter when very fat; they are roasted plain or with a thin slice of bacon and a leaf of celery tied over them ; they require about eight minutes, and served with a little gravy and b...
-596. Quail (La Caille)
Should be killed at least forty-eight hours before they are wanted; they should then be plucked, singed, drawn, and trussed by cutting off the wings at the first pinion, leaving the feet, and fixing t...
-597. Rabbits
There are two sorts, the tame and -wild; the wild or gray inhabits the mountainous districts; has the finest flavor, or on those places where it can feed on thyme, geneva, or other aromatic herbs, or...
-598. Hares
One is sufficient for a roast, skin and truss it nicely, stuff the interior with a good veal stuffing, sew it up, then put it on the spit, rub butter over the back and shake flour over it, roast it ab...
-600. Wild Fowl Sauce
The following is a good sauce ; the quantities are given for one wild duck. Walnut catsup one tablespoonful; the same of Harvey's or Worcestershire sauce, the same of lemon-juice, a wine-glass of r...
-601. Fumet De Gibier Sauce
Take the remains or bones of game (the back-bones of grouse are best), chop them up small, put them in a stewpan, with a glass of white wine, an onion, a small piece of carrot and of turnip sliced, a ...
-602. Veal And Ham Pies (Raised)
The following few dishes will be found extremely useful for breakfasts, luncheons, second course in a dinner party, or for dinner in summer, but above all for supper when you give an evening party. ...
-603. Raised Pie Of Fowls
Make the paste and forcemeat as in the last, but instead of veal and ham, bone a young fowl as directed for galantine, which lay flat upon a clean cloth, breast downwards, season the interior with a l...
-604. Raised Pie Of Pheasant
Proceed precisely as for the pie of fowl, but of course using a pheasant, an old one would answer the purpose if kept long enough, but all the sinews of the legs must be taken out in boning it, the fi...
-605. Simple Method Of Making Pies
Make two pounds of flour into a paste, as No. 602, and also two pounds of force-meat, mould three quarters of the paste into a ball, which, with a rolling-pin, roll to about half an inch in thickness ...
-606. Tureen Of Game
I bought the other day a common earthen tureen, for which I gave ninepence ; I made some force-meat precisely the same as for pies, boned a grouse and stuffed it as for a pheasant pie, and seasoning t...
-607. Galantines
Having twice failed in the attempt to make this difficult dish, I was about to relinquish the idea, but having received a small turkey about two months back, I could not resist making another attempt,...
-608. How To Clarify Meat Jelly
Having passed the stock (made as in the last) through a sieve into a basin, leave it until quite cold; then take off all the fat very carefully, ascertain if sufficiently or too stiff by putting a sma...
-609. Cold Ham
Procure a very nice but small ham of about nine pounds in weight, which soak about ten hours in cold water, and simmer three hours in plenty of water; when done, take out and let remain until cold; th...
-610. Cold Tongue
Boil a nice ox tongue for three hours, and, when done, take off all the skin, and truss it of a good shape, by placing the root against some fixture, and running a fork through the middle of the thin ...
-611. Galantine Of Veal
When I do not like to go to the expense of a turkey or other poultry for a galantine, I procure a small breast of veal, and take out the tendons, which I stew; take out the remaining bones, and trim t...
-612. Cold Fillet Of Veal
Roast braise as No. 358; when cold, trim neatly, and garnish with jelly or parsley. A loin of veal larded through the fleshy part with raw ham, and fat bacon, and roasted as above, makes a very del...
-613. Ribs Of Beef Larded
Choose a piece of beef with about four ribs, and cut very long, carefully take away the bones, lard the fleshy part through with strips of fat bacon, well seasoned with pepper, salt, and chopped parsl...
-614. Pressed Beef
Procure a piece of brisket of beef, cut off the bones, and salt it as directed (No. 615), but adding a little extra sal prunella to the brine and a little spice; let the beef remain in pickle rather b...
-615. Pickle For Beef A La Garrick
Take twenty pounds of salt, three quarters of a pound of saltpetre, four cakes of sal prunella, two pounds of moist sugar, two cloves of garlic, with which rub the meat well, and leave it rather more ...
-616. Spiced Beef
Procure a piece of thin flank of beef about ten pounds in weight, which salt as the last for about a week; when ready, split it open with a knife and lay it out flat upon a dresser, having previously ...
-617. Pig's Head In Imitation Of Wild Boar's Head
This you will say is not only a difficult dish to do, but a very expensive one. You are right when you are obliged to buy the pig to possess the head; but in a small farm-house where they kill a pig p...
-Boar's Head Sauce
Cut the rind (free from pith) of two Seville oranges into very thin strips half an inch in length, which blanch in boiling water, drain them upon a sieve, and put them into a basin, with a spoonful of...
-Letter No. XV
Dear Eloise, - To you, who are so fond of lobster, the following receipt will, I am confident, prove most valuable. To make sure of its quality, buy one heavy in proportion to its size: or, perhaps, e...
-Lobster
This fish, which is continually before our eyes, and only looked upon as an article of food, is, without doubt, one of the wonders of the creation. A creature destitute of bones, yet furnished with a ...
-618. Gratin Of Lobster
Procure a good-sized lobster, cut it in half, detaching the head from the body; take out all the meat, and save the four shells; cut the meat into slices, then take a teaspoonful of chopped eschalots ...
-619. Miroton Salad Of Lobster
Prepare and ornament a border of eggs, like for that of game, put a thick layer of fresh salad in the centre, and dress over it in a crown, the lobster interspersed with slices of eggs and gherkins. T...
-620. Salad Tartar
Make as usual the border of eggs and sauce, lay the salad in the middle and the lobster over, which has been previously cut in slices; pour over some of the same sauce as above, having added a tablesp...
-621. Plain Salad
Take a lobster and any kind of salad, wash it well, dry in a cloth, cut the lobster up in a salad-bowl, sprinkle over it a teaspoonful of salt, half that of pepper, one of chopped tarragon or chervil,...
-622. Lobster Served Plain
Break the tail from the body, cut the tail in two lengthwise, put the body in the middle of the dish, lay the half tail top and bottom, and the claws on the side; the shell previously broken, but not ...
-623. Lobster Salad
Dress a border of hard-boiled eggs, as directed in salad of game (No. 628), fill the centre with some nice fresh salad, then take the flesh from a middling-sized lobster, which cut into as large slice...
-624. Fish Salads
All fish salads are made precisely as in the last, but with the exception of fillets of sole salad, are made from the remains of fish from a previous dinner, especially turbot and salmon; but for fill...
-625. New Mayonnaise Sauce
Put a quarter of a pint of melted aspic upon ice in a stewpan, which keep whisking until becoming a white froth, then add half a pint of salad oil and six spoonfuls of tarragon vinegar, by degrees, fi...
-626. Tartar Sauce
Rub the yolk of a cold hard-boiled egg through a hair sieve into a basin, to which add the yolks of two raw eggs, with a little salt and pepper; mix all together with a wooden spoon; have a pint of go...
-627. Salmon In Marinade
Have two good slices of salmon cut about four inches and a half in thickness, in a stewpan have three onions cut in slices, as also a turnip, a carrot, a head of celery cut small, a good half handful ...
-628. Salad Of Game
Boil eight eggs hard, shell them, throw them into cold water, cut a thin slice off the bottom to facilitate the proper placing of them in the dish, cut each one into four, lengthwise, make a very thi...
-629. Salad Of Fowl
Proceed as for that of game, so far as the eggs and the salad are concerned; then have a chicken, which has been previously plain roasted, or in vegetables, and cut it into ten pieces, put it into a b...
-Shell Fish
Prawns are best when very red and have no spawn under the tail. The Escalop is a fish very little used, but is exceedingly fine; it is in season at the same time as the oyster. It can be cooked in ...
-Oysters
No oyster should be eaten under four years old; their age is known by their shell - just the same as the age of a tree is known by its bark, or a fish by its scale, and the small oyster has the finest...
-630. Escaloped Oysters
Put two dozen of oysters with their liquor into a stewpan, place over a fire, and when a little firm, drain them upon a sieve, catching the liquor in another stewpan; detach the beard from the oysters...
-631. Stewed Oysters
Blanch and beard the oysters as above; when done, put them with their liquor in a stewpan, with four cloves, a blade of mace, and a teaspoonful of essence of anchovies, with a little chopped parsley a...
-632. Shrimps
Of these there are several varieties; a diversity of opinion exists amongst epicures of this little animal which is the best; but in my opinion a great deal depends on the manner of boiling, and their...
-633. Forcemeat
You will find this receipt so useful, and so often in use in made dishes, soups, fish, entrees, etc, that I must beg of you to devote to it your personal attention; and being rather difficult to execu...
-634. Panada For Forcemeats
Put two thirds of half a pint of water into a stewpan holding a quart, with nearly an ounce of butter; when boiling, stir in a quarter of a pound of flour; keep it moving over the fire until it forms ...
-635. Forcemeats Of Fish
These are much in use in France and other Catholic countries, especially in Lent, but they are a very excellent garnish for entrees of fish; they may be made of the flesh of almost all kinds of fish, ...
-636. Forcemeat Of Whitings
Take the fillets of three whitings, take off all the skin, and pound them well, then take them from the mortar, and form them into a ball; have a piece of panada (No. 634) one third the size of the b...
-637. Stuffing For Veal
Chop up half a pound of beef suet very fine, put it in a basin, with eight ounces of bread-crumbs, four ounces of chopped parsley, a tablespoonful of equal quantities of powdered thyme and marjoram, a...
-Vegetables
In describing to you the different ways these may be dressed, I beg of you to make a constant use of them at your own table, as you will find they will be much better than partaking of half-raw greens...
-638. Asparagus
I cook it thus: I take a bundle and scrape lightly all the white part, beginning from the head down, and throw them when done into cold water, then tie them up in bundles of twenty-five each, if an or...
-639. Young Green Peas
Young Green Peas! Do not those words sound pleasant to the ear, dearest ? I fancy that by merely raising my eyes from the paper on which I am now writing, I shall see all our garden in buds and blosso...
-640. Peas, French Way
They do not look so inviting, not being so green; but I must say they are excellent as regards flavor. Choose them young and fresh ; without both of these qualities, they would not cook properly. Put ...
-641. Seakale
Proceed exactly as for asparagus for boiling, but previously to boiling cut out the black part of the roots, and well wash and tie it together, and serve with the same sauce as asparagus. There is a k...
-642. Sprue-Grass
The longer the green part the better the sprue; take each piece and gently bend it, and it will break off at that part which you require, beyond it is too hard, and cannot be eaten; when you thus have...
-643. Celery
Cut about ten heads of large celery from six to seven inches long, trim the outside and cut the root to a point, wash it very well between the leaves, tie three together, put a gallon of water, with t...
-644. Salsify
I do not know why this vegetable, which is held in such high estimation on the Continent, should be so little esteemed with us; I will here supply their manner of cooking it, and perhaps you will give...
-645. Vegetable Marrow
Choose eight young small ones, with smooth skin, and put them to boil in two quarts of water, in which you have put one ounce of salt, the same of butter, try with a needle if tender, then dish them t...
-646. Cauliflower And Broccoli
Be very particular in cleaning them, choose them rather small, thick and firm, put them for one hour in salt and water, then rinse them well in water, that all the dirt may be removed from the interio...
-648. Jerusalem Artichokes
One of the best and most useful vegetables ever introduced to table, and anything but appreciated as it deserves to be. To prove to you that I am a great admirer of it, you will find it very often men...
-650. Artichokes
Pull the tail off four or six small artichokes, trim the bottom slightly with a knife, cut the point of every leaf, wash well in plain water, put them on in plenty of water, with a little salt, to boi...
-651. Beet-Root
This is a very good dish, and, as I believe it has never been noticed in cookery, I must lay claim to its parentage; I have given the receipt to some friends, who highly approve of it. Take two nice y...
-652. French Beans
These are also a great favorite with many. To dress it, head and tail them, drawing off the back string, cut in long diamonds, boil till tender in water in which salt has been placed, a quarter of a p...
-654. Kidney Beans
Head and tail them, string and slit them down the middle, place them for half an hour in salt and water in which you have thrown a little culinary alkali, boil until tender, and serve with melted butt...
-655. Broad Or Windsor Beans
Boil in salt and water : when done, serve with parsley and butter, or with a piece of bacon. ...
-656. Brussels Sprouts
Trim, wash, and boil about forty small Brussels sprouts; when tender, drain, dish, and sprinkle a little salt, pepper, and two ounces of butter over, and serve. Serve also in sauce, or with maitre d'h...
-657. Spinach
This vegetable is very light and very good for invalids. It must be washed in several waters, after having been well picked; then put a quarter of a sieve of spinach to, a gallon of water and three ou...
-660. Young Haricot Beans
Take a pint, boil in two quarts of water, with a small piece of butter, and half an ounce of salt; when done, which will take only a few minutes, dish and serve; put butter over, sprinkle a little sal...
-662. Mushrooms
These are good every way when fresh ; for a dish take about fifty button, cut the roots off, wash and rub the skin off with a cloth, cut them in slices the size of a shilling, tail and all, put them i...
-663. Lentils
Put into a stewpan one quart, add two quarts of cold water, one ounce of butter, a little salt, one onion sliced, a bouquet of parsley, set on the fire, simmer till tender, which may be in two hours ;...
-664. English Truffles
Put twelve of them to soak for four hours in lukewarm water; then with a hard hair-brush remove all the earth from them; then wash again, put them into a stewpan, with a few slices of bacon, two onion...
-666. How To Cook Sourcrout
Put a quart of sourcrout, with a fat piece of bacon or pork, into an earthen pan, with sufficient water to cover it, stew for four or five hours, and serve with pork or fried sausages; it is better th...
-Laver
668. Laver is a marine plant (the Ulvce Lactuca), which is obtained, in London, from the West of England; in Dublin, from Malahide; Edinburgh, from Aberdeen. It is merely washed, boiled, pulped, and ...
-Potatoes
This root still bears its original American name, signifying earth-apple, and is divided into many species. Amongst those most common in use are the regent, ash-leaf, kidney; but, in the sister kingdo...
-669. Plain Boiled Or Steamed Potatoes
Well wash the potatoes and peel them, and throw them into cold water (that depends upon the kind, if new or young, or a kidney, they should be cooked immediately after they are peeled, whilst others r...
-670. Baked Potatoes
This is a very favorite dish with many persons ; they ought to be of a large size, called Regents, and when cooked very floury. Mr. B. tells me he sometimes lunches at a house in the city where the pr...
-671. Fried Potatoes
The long kidney potato is the best for this purpose; they should be washed and peeled, and cut into very thin slices, and thrown into boiling fat until a nice light brown color; dish up very hot, thro...
-672. Mashed Potatoes
Steam about ten fine potatoes for about thirty-five minutes, put them into a stewpan or bowl, with two ounces of butter, one teaspoonful of salt, a smaller spoonful of pepper, and half a pint of milk,...
-673. Potatoes A La Maitre D'Hotel
With young potatoes they are excellent. Boil ten middle-sized ones cut in slices of a quarter of an inch thick, put in the stewpan half a pint of milk or the same of broth, a little salt, pepper, grat...
-674. Lyonnaise
The remains of cold potatoes may be used thus : - Put three ounces of butter in an omelette pan, in which you fry rather white three sliced onions; put on the potatoes, cut in thin slices about the si...
-675. Irish Way Of Boiling
In Ireland, where this root has been for so long a period the chief nourishment of the people, and where it takes the place of bread and other more substantial food, it is cooked so that it may have, ...
-676. How To Blanch Macaroni
Have half a gallon of water in a stewpan, in which put two ounces of butter and an ounce of salt; when boiling, throw in a pound of macaroni, which boil until tender, being careful that it is not too ...
-677. Macaroni A L'Italienne
Boil half a pound of macaroni as above; when done, lay it on a sieve to dry for one minute, put it in a pan, with four spoonfuls of white sauce, add half a teaspoonful of salt, a quarter ditto of pepp...
-678. Macaroni Au Gratin
Proceed the same as above; but after you have put the macaroni on the dish, omit the gravy, and cover it slightly with bread-crumbs, and about the same quantity of Parmesan cheese grated, a little but...
-679. Macaroni A La Napolitaine
Boil half a pound of the best quality of macaroni for half an hour, as at No. 736 ; when tender, lay one quarter of it on the dish you intend to serve; have ready two ounces of grated Parmesan cheese,...
-681. Fried Mashed Potatoes In Various Shapes
Koast twelve fine potatoes; when done, take out the interior, which form into a ball; when cold, put them into a mortar, with a piece of butter half the size of the ball; pound them well together, sea...
-682. How To Boil Rice
Wash well in two separate waters a pound of the best Carolina rice, then have two quarts of water boiling in a stewpan, into which throw your rice, boil it until three parts done, then drain it on a s...
-683. Chopping Of Herbs, Etc
This may appear a very simple thing to do well, yet it is often done badly, by which the flavor is lost. They should be well washed and dried, and then take the leaves in the left hand, pressing upon ...
-Of Different Sorts Of Pastry
The variety of pastes is to the pastry what first stocks are to soups and sauces, and must be very properly first described, particularly as it is here I must refer my readers for paste even used for ...
-684. Puff Paste
Put one pound of flour upon your pastry slab, make a hole in the centre, in which put the yolk of one egg and the juice of a lemon, with a pinch of salt, mix it with cold water (iced in summer, if con...
-685. Puff Paste, With Beef Suet
Where you cannot obtain good butter for making paste, the following is an excellent substitute; skin and chop one pound of kidney beef suet very fine, put it into a mortar and pound it well, moistenin...
-686. Half Puff Paste
Put one pound of flour upon your pastry slab, with two ounces of butter, rub well together with the hands, make a hole in the centre, in which put a pinch of salt and the yolk of an egg with the juice...
-687. Short Paste, Or Pate A Foncer
Put a pound of best flour upon your pastry slab, make a hole in the centre, in which put an ounce of salt, half a pound of fresh butter, and sufficient water to form a stiff paste, mix well together, ...
-688. Short Paste For Fruit Tarts
Put a pound of flour upon your pastry slab with six ounces of butter, and rub them well together; then make a hole in the centre, in which put two ounces of powdered sugar, two whole eggs, and a large...
-689. Pate D'Office, Or Confectioner's Paste
Weigh half a pound of flour, which put upon your slab, make a hole in the centre, in which put six ounces of sifted sugar, mix it well with four eggs into a stiffish paste, having first well dissolved...
-Vols-au-Vent
690. Vols-au-Vent of all things in pastry require the most care and precision; they that can make a good vol-au-vent may be stamped as good pastrycooks, although many variations in working puff paste,...
-Vols-au-Vent. Continued
693. Sweet Vol-Au-Vent With Rhubarb In the spring of the year, this makes a very inviting and wholesome dish, and its qualities purify the blood, which the winter's food has rendered gross; cut ...
-702. Little Fruit Rissolettes
I also make with the trimmings of puff paste the following little cakes : if you have about a quarter of a pound of puff paste left, roll it out very thin, about the thickness of half a crown, put hal...
-Flancs
At this part of the dinner there are those dishes which are called Flancs, by which is understood, those dishes whose contents are not so large as the removes and not so small as the entrees, and the ...
-708. Small Fruit Tarts
The next in order to sweet vol-au-vents, and which are easier to make, are tartlets, their appearance being inviting, and their expense limited, and very easy to serve. They may be made from the trimm...
-710. Flanc Meringue Of Apple
Sometimes I make a meringue of three eggs, as No. 711; when it is hard I cover the apples with it half an inch thick, keeping the pyramid ; then I put the remainder in a paper cornet; cut the point so...
-711. Meringues A, La Cuilleree
Pound and sift one pound of lump sugar, whisk the whites of twelve eggs very stiff, throw the sugar lightly over, and with a wooden spoon stir gently, perfectly mixing the sugar, then with a table or ...
-712. Gateau Fourre
This style of cake is exceedingly simple, and admits of great variation. You must make a half pound of puff paste (No. 684), take one third of it and roll it out several times so as to deaden it, then...
-713. Dartoise Fourree
The former one must be made in proportion to the dish you intend to serve on, but the following is simple, and looks as well: prepare the paste as before, but roll the bottom piece square, put it on a...
-714. Nougat Of Apricot
Proceed as above, but lay apricot marmalade all over a quarter of an inch thick, blanched almonds, cut into fillets, mixed with two ounces of sugar, and the white of an egg added to it, bake in a mode...
-715. Crusts Of Fruit
Put a quarter of a pound of butter in a saute- or frying-pan, sprinkle a little sugar over, cut four or five slices of bread a quarter of an inch thick, three inches long, and one and a half wide, lay...
-716. Crusts With Madeira
Cut a French penny roll length-wise in four or five slices, put the yolks of two eggs, with four spoonfuls of milk, mix it in a plate, dip quickly each piece in it, and saute in a quarter of a pound o...
-717. Cheesecakes
Under this head, in English Cookery Books, are a variety of Receipts, but in fact, there is only one; the others may all be denominated tartlets of one kind or the other, and require but little skill ...
-718. Richmond Maids Of Honor
These delicious little cakes, which every inhabitant of London who pays a visit to the most picturesque part of its environs knows so well, derive their name from a period when cookery was not thought...
-719. Lemon Cheesecakes
Take two large lemons, and rub the rind with one pound of loaf sugar, so that all the yellow part is removed; place the sugar in a basin, squeeze the juice of the lemons over, then add the yolks of si...
-720. Sweet Omelettes
Break six eggs in a basin, into which put a teaspoonful of sugar, three of cream, or a few small pieces of butter; put two ounces of butter in an omelette pan; when quite hot, pour in the eggs and pro...
-722. Macedoine Of Omelettes
Instead of making one with eight eggs, make four, with two eggs each, of different kinds of preserves; serve on the same dish, sugar over, etc., as before. ...
-723. Omelette With Rum
The same as sweet omelette, but, the moment of going to table, pour two glasses of rum round, and set it on the fire. ...
-724. Beignet Souffle
Put in a stewpan a pint of milk or water, a teaspoonful of sugar, two ounces of butter, a few drops of essence of vanilla, or any flavor you please; give it a boil, throw in some flour, keep stirring ...
-725. Apple Fritters
Mix one pound of flour with half a pint of milk or water, then half a pound of butter melted in a stewpan, mix well together with a wooden spoon very smooth, thin it a little with table-beer or water,...
-729. Pancake With Marmalade
Put a quarter of a pound of sifted flour into a basin, with four eggs, mix them together very smoothly, then add half a pint of milk or cream, and a little grated nutmeg, put a piece of butter in your...
-730. Apple Charlotte With Butter
For the few following receipts, the russet apple is the one I should recommend, it being the most suitable, not being so watery, or falling in puree, but in case they cannot be obtained, other sorts m...
-731. Apples With Rice
Peel and quarter twelve good-sized apples, put them into a preserving-pan, with three quarters of a pound of sugar, the thin rind of a lemon in strips, the juice of another, and a wineglassful of wate...
-732. Pears With Rice
Peel and cut in halves eighteen small ripe pears, which put in a small preserving-pan, with three quarters of a pound of sugar, a little water, and the juice of two lemons, stew them till tender, then...
-733. Apples With Butter
Peel eighteen russet apples, which cut in quarters, and trim of a nice shape, put them into a small preserving-pan, with two ounces of butter and three quarters of a pound of sugar, having previously ...
-734. Apple Bread, Russian Fashion
Put one pound and a half of lump sugar and a pint and a half of water into a round-bottomed copper preserving-pan, place it over a sharp fire and reduce it to a crack, have ready twenty-four good brow...
-735. Apples Saute In Butter
Procure a dozen russet apples, which cut into slices a quarter of an inch in thickness, peel and take out the cores with a round cutter, then put two ounces of butter in a saute-pan, spread it over th...
-736. Croquettes Of Rice
Well wash half a pound of the best Carolina rice, which put into a stewpan, with a pint and a half of milk, and a quarter of a pound of butter, place it upon the fire, stir until boiling, then place i...
-737. Croquettes Of Macaroni
Blanch six ounces of macaroni in two quarts of water until tender, then strain and put it in a basin of cold water; when cold cut it into pieces half an inch in length, and put it into a stewpan conta...
-738. Pastry Cream Sauted
Put the yolks of six eggs in a stewpan, with two good tablespoonfuls of sifted flour, mix quite smooth with a wooden spoon; then add a pint of boiling milk or cream, stir in by degrees, and place it o...
-Jellies
Nothing, I am confident, will give you more pleasure than trying the receipts which I am now about giving you; they are for jellies, that is, those made from gelatinous substances of animal production...
-741. Hartshorn Jelly
Use half a pound of hartshorn shavings, boil in three quarts of water, and reduce to one; proceed as before. Also Arney's jelly powder can be used instead of any of the above, by dissolving in boiling...
-746. Orange Jelly
Procure five oranges and one lemon, take the rind off two of the oranges, and half of the lemon, and remove the pith, put them into a basin, and squeeze the juice of the fruit into it; then put a quar...
-750. Charlotte Russe
Line the inside of a plain round mould with Savoy biscuits, cutting and placing them at the bottom to form a rosette, standing them upright and close together, fill with any of the above creams, omitt...
-751. Strawberry Charlotte
Line a plain round mould with ripe strawberries by burying the mould in ice to the rim, and dipping the strawberries in calf's foot jelly, first covering the bottom with them cut in halves, the cut si...
-752. Chartreuse Cake Of Variegated Fruits
Line a charlotte mould very tastefully with various kinds of fruits (such as stoned cherries, strawberries, pieces of peaches, apricots, etc.) by dipping them into jelly, forming some design at the bo...
-753. Blancmange
To one quart of milk add one ounce of isinglass, a quarter of a pound of sugar, a quarter of an ounce of cinnamon, a little grated nutmeg, half of the peel of a lemon, and a bay-leaf, simmer over a sl...
-Trifles
755. Trifles should be made early in the day on which they are wanted; take a stale Savoy cake, cut it in slices of one inch thick, and lay it on the bottom of the dish; lay on that a thin layer of ...
-Puddings In Moulds
We have already, in the Comforts for Invalids, given several of the most simple receipts. I prefer using, in these kinds of puddings, as the principal ingredient, stale Savoy cake, or sponge cakes, or...
-756. Pudding A La Eloise
It is made as follows: take half a pound of bread-crumbs, which put in a basin, with two ounces of sago, six ounces of chopped suet, six eggs, five ounces of moist sugar, and a tablespoonful of either...
-757. Pudding A La Reine
Butter and paper the mould, fill up with cake or bread-crumbs, when full pour some custard in until it will hold no more; this may be flavored with any white liquor or essence you please, for instance...
-758. Mince-Meat Pudding
Butter and paper the mould, then put a layer of cake and a layer of mince-meat alternately, till full, then add the custard. ...
-759. Demi-Plum Pudding
Prepare the mould, then add a layer of plum pudding, broken in pieces, that has been left from the previous day, alternately, till full, fill up with custard, and steam or bake for three minutes. The ...
-760. Trifle Pudding
Prepare the mould, and fill with the same ingredients as directed for trifle, taking care that the wine, etc., is well soaked in before adding the custard. Steam or bake thirty minutes. The sides and ...
-761. Carrot Pudding
Mix in a bowl half a pound of flour, half a pound of chopped suet, three quarters of a pound of grated carrot, a quarter of a pound of raisins stoned, a quarter of a pound of currants, and a quarter o...
-762. Plum Pudding
Pick and stone one pound of the best Malaga raisins, which put in a basin, with one pound of currants (well washed, dried, and picked), a pound and a half of good beef suet (chopped, but not too fine)...
-763. Rowley Powley
Roll out about two pounds of paste (No. 685), cover it with any jam or marmalade you like, roll it over and tie it loose in a cloth, well tying each end; boil one hour and serve, or cut it in slices a...
-764. Plum Bolster, Or Spotted Dick
Roll out two pounds of paste (No. 685), having some Smyrna raisins well washed, and place them on it here and there, roll over, tie in a cloth, and boil one hour, and serve with butter and brown sugar...
-766. Apple Dumplings
Peel and cut out the core with a cutter, cover it with paste (No. 685), tie in a cloth, and boil according to size; these are all the better for being boiled and kept in the cloth, hung up for four or...
-Plain Baked Puddings in Dishes
767. Marrow Pudding may be made in various ways; it is best with half a pound of ladies' finger cakes, and a quarter of a pound of beef marrow, chopped fine, a quarter of a pound of currants well ...
-768. Custard Pudding
Make a border of paste on the dish, and fill up with custard, grate a little nutmeg on the top. Any kind of fruit puddings with custard may be made in the same way, by placing them in the custard, ...
-Fruit Puddings
769. Fruit Puddings are best made in a basin, the basin to be buttered and lined with the paste, and then filled with the fruit, which cover with the paste, the paste should be rolled round to the ...
-773. Mince Meat
Procure four pounds and a half of kidney beef suet, which skin and chop very finely; have also a quarter of a pound of candied lemon and orange-peel; the same of citron, a pound and a half of lean coo...
-774. Mince Pies
Have a piece of puff-paste, which roll out to the thickness of a penny-piece; have also a dozen tartlet-pans, which lightly butter, cut out twelve pieces with a round cutter from the paste, each the s...
-775. Fruit Pies
These are made in pie-dishes, the top of which is only covered with paste; the edge of the dish should be wetted, and a strip of paste, about one inch wide and a quarter of an inch thick, put on it, t...
-776. Apple Pie
Pare, cut, and core sufficient apples to fill the dish, put a small cup in the middle or not, as you like, one clove, to every three apples, a pinch of pounded cinnamon, a small piece of chopped lemon...
-778. Chestnut Pudding, Nesselrode Fashion
Blanch four dozen chestnuts in boiling water, skim and place them in the screen, when dry take them out, and when cold put them into a mortar, with one pound of sugar, and half a stick of vanilla, pou...
-779. Iced Cabinet Pudding
Have ready prepared, and rather stale, a sponge-cake as directed (No. 859), which cut into slices half an inch thick, and rather smaller than the mould you intend making the pudding in, soak them well...
-780. White Almond Pudding Ices
Blanch and skin a quarter of a pound of sweet almonds, with six or eight bitter ones, when dry and cold, place them in a mortar, with three quarters of a pound of sugar, and ten or twelve leaves of ca...
-781. Fruit, Chartreuse Of With Lemon Jelly
Make a chartreuse of fruit as directed (No. 752), in a round or oval mould, having a quantity of fruit left; having also about a quart of orange jelly, which place upon ice in a bowl, whisking it unti...
-782. Souffle Of Orange Iced
Prepare about three parts of the quantity of ice as directed in the last, to which, when half frozen, add a pint and a half of whipped orange jelly just upon the point of setting, beat the whole well ...
-783. Punch Cake Souffle
Break ten eggs, put the whites in a copper bowl, and the yolks in a basin, with four table-spoonfuls of powdered sugar, four of crushed ratafias, two of potato flour, a little salt, and a quarter of a...
-784. Souffle Of Lemon, Or Any Other Flavor
Prepare a crust or croustade. of fine paste (No. 687), or water paste, by lining a raised pie-mould with it, filling with bread-crumbs, and finishing the edges as for a raised pie; bake it (of a very ...
-785. Souffle Of Orange-Flowers
Proceed exactly as in the last, but infusing an ounce of candied orange-flowers in the milk instead of the vanilla. 786. Souffle of Rice Cream is made by using ground rice instead of the common flo...
-787. Souffle Of Lemon
Proceed as directed for souffle a la vanille, but infusing the rind of two lemons, free from pith, in the milk instead of the vanilla. ...
-788. Omelette Souffle
Break six eggs, place the yolks in one basin and the whites in another; add to the yolks three tablespoonfuls of lump sugar, half one of fecule of potato or wheat flour, and ten drops of orange-flower...
-789. Omelette Souffle Saute
The mixture is prepared precisely as the last, but the appearance and flavor are very differ-ent, being produced by the different method of cooking them; put an ounce of butter into a very clean omele...
-790. Cream Omelette Souffle
Proceed as in the last, deducting two of the whites of eggs, and adding a gill of whipped cream, saute and serve as before. ...
-791. Souffle Biscuits
Put the yolks of five eggs in a basin, and the whites in a copper bowl, add a pound of sugar, upon which you have rubbed the rind of a lemon previous to pounding, beat it well with the yolks of the eg...
-792. Souffle, Or Whipped Cream
Take one quart of cream, put it into a bowl, with a quarter of a pound of powdered sugar, and orange-flower powder of water, and have another bowl near you, over which you must place a sieve to receiv...
-Fondue
795. Fondue Of Parmesan And Gruyere, Or Any Other Grated Cheese Put a quarter of a pound of butter and six ounces of flour in a stewpan, mix them well together (without melting the butter) with a ...
-799. Cheese Raminole
Put a gill of water in a stewpan, to which add two ounces of Gruye're and the same quantity of Parmesan cheese (grated), two ounces of butter, a little cayenne pepper, and salt if required, set it upo...
-800. Puff Cheesecake
Make half a pound of paste (No. 686), which roll very thin, have ready some grated Parmesan and Gruyere cheese mixed, throw half a handful over the paste, which fold in three, roll it out to the same ...
-801. Cheese Souffle, Or Diablotins
Put a gill of milk in a stewpan, with two ounces of butter; when boiling, stir in two spoonfuls of flour, keep stirring over the fire until the bottom of the stewpan is dry, then add four eggs by degr...
-802. Turban Of Almond Cake Iced
This is a very good and useful second course remove. Make half a pound of puff paste, give it nine rolls, rolling it the last time to the thickness of a penny-piece, have ready blanched and chopped ha...
-804. Custard For Puddings
Take one pint of milk, to which add the yolks of two eggs, and beat up, add a quarter of a pound of sugar, half a saltspoonful of powdered cinnamon and nutmeg, and a bay-leaf. For mould puddings, the ...
-805. Batter For Fritters
Take half a pound of flour, one ounce of butter, which melt, the whites of three eggs well beaten, half a glass of beer, and enough water to make a thick batter. ...
-Dessert. Letter No. XVI
Ma chere Eloise, - Remembering your admiration of the small dessert I put on the table at my last birth-day party, you will, I am confident, feel interested in the description of desserts in general, ...
-806. Winter Pears
To put an end to its long and hard existence, I would cut it into six or eight pieces lengthwise, peel and cut out the cores, giving them a nice shape ; then put them into a stewpan, with a quarter of...
-807. Compote Of Peaches
Put half a pound of lump sugar (broken into small pieces) into a stewpan, with a quarter of a pint of water, which set upon the fire to boil until forming a thickish syrup; you have previously cut fou...
-808. Compote Of Apples
Procure six nice ripe apples, but not too large, which peel, cut in halves, and cut out the cores, rub each piece over with a little lemon, and put them into boiling syrup made as last directed, but w...
-809. Compote Of Small Apples, Served Whole
Select nine small golden pippins, each as nearly as possible of an equal size, and with a long round vegetable cutter, of the size of a six-penny piece, cut out the cores, then peel them very thin and...
-810. Compote Of Green Apricots
Have a pottle of green apricots, from which pick off all the stalks, and throw them into a stewpan containing a quart of boiling water, and let them boil very fast for ten minutes, and drain them upon...
-811. Compote Of Greengages
Procure twelve greengages, not quite ripe, each of which cut into halves; have ready boiling half a pint of syrup, as before directed, into which put half the fruit, let it simmer a couple of minutes,...
-812. Compote Of Apricots
Procure six very fine ripe apricots, which divide into halves; have ready half a pint of boiling syrup reduced quite thick, in which let them simmer about a minute, when pour the whole into a basin un...
-813. Compote Of Cherries
Take a pound of fine cherries, not too ripe, and cut away half the stalks with a pair of scissors; have half a pint of syrup, which boil until very thick, when add half of the cherries, and boil them ...
-814. Compote Of Oranges
Make a pint of syrup as before; have six fine oranges, which skin carefully, scraping off as much of the pith as possible; divide each orange into eight entire pieces, without breaking the delicate sk...
-815. Compote Of French Plums
Put half a pound of French plums into a stewpan, with a gill of water, the same of wine, the rind of half a lemon cut thin, two cloves, and a good spoonful of sugar, let them simmer about twenty minut...
-816. Pears
Cut six ripe middling-sized pears in halves, peel neatly, cut out the cores, and put them into a stewpan, with a quarter of a pound of powdered sugar, the juice of a lemon, the thin rind cut into stri...
-817. Pippins
Peel and cut four apples into quarters, take out the cores, and stew them as directed for pears, but using the rind of an orange instead of the rind of a lemon. ...
-818. Oranges
Prepare four oranges as directed (No. 814), which put into a stewpan, with a quarter of a pound of powdered sugar, and the juice of another orange; set them upon the fire, and when the syrup becomes s...
-819. Apricots
Cut eight unripe apricots into quarters, which put into a stewpan, with four ounces of sugar, the juice of a lemon, and a drop of sherry, set them upon the fire, shaking the stewpan round occasionally...
-820. Greengages And Other Plums
Put twelve into a stew-pan with a quarter of a pound of sugar, the juice of a lemon and a little drop of water, set them over the fire, shaking the stewpan round occasionally until the fruit is tender...
-821. Cherries
Cut the stalks of a pound of cherries rather short, and put the fruit into a stewpan, with a quarter of a pound of sugar and the juice of a lemon; place them over the fire (occasionally shaking the pa...
-822. Green Gooseberries
Put a pint of green gooseberries into a stewpan with two ounces of sugar and a little sherry, place them over a sharp fire, as the quicker they cook the better color they will keep; when tender but no...
-823. Red Rhubarb
The small forced rhubarb (Mitchell's Royal Albert) is by far the best. Cut about half a pound of it into pieces half an inch in length, which put into a stewpan with a quarter of a pound of powdered s...
-824. Currants And Raspberries
Pick the stalks from a pint of currants, which put into a stewpan with half a pint of raspberries and a quarter of a pound of powdered sugar; set them upon the fire, shaking the stewpan round occasion...
-828. How To Give Color To Sugar
Prepare about half a pound of the sugar as in the last, which put upon a baking-sheet; have a spoonful of the essence of spinach, which stir in with the sugar until every grain is stained, then put th...
-829. Sugar Of Vanilla
Chop a stick of well-frosted vanilla very small, and put it into a mortar, with half a pound of lump sugar, pound the whole well together in a mortar, sift through a hair sieve, and put by in a bottle...
-830. Sugar Of Lemon
Rub the rind of some fresh lemons upon a large piece of sugar, and as it discolors the part upon which it is rubbed scrape it off with a knife; when you have obtained a sufficient quantity, dry a litt...
-831. How To Make Clear Sugar
Break three pounds of fine white sugar, the hardest and closest grained is the best, put it into a sugar-pan, with three pints of clear spring water, set over a sharp fire, and when beginning to boil ...
-832. Silk Thread, Or Spun Sugar
Having boiled your sugar to the seventh degree, as in the last, oil the handle of a wooden spoon, tie two forks together, the prongs turned outwards, dip them lightly into the sugar, take out and shak...
-833. Vanilla Ice Cream
Put the yolks of twelve eggs in a stewpan, with half a pound of sugar, beat well together with a wooden spoon, in another stewpan have a quart of milk, and when boiling throw in two sticks of vanilla,...
-834. Coffee Ice Cream
Proceed exactly as in the last, but omitting the noyeau or maresquino, and making an infusion with coffee as directed (No. 40) instead of vanilla. 835. Ice of Chocolate is made similar to the vanil...
-836. Ice Of Pine-Apple
Procure a rather small pine-apple, take off the rind, which reserve, and cut the apple into pieces an inch in length and about the thickness of a quill, place them in a sugar-pan, with half a pound of...
-837. Lemon Ice Cream
Take the rind from six lemons as thin as possible and free from pith, squeeze the juice of the lemons into a sugar-pan, with half a pound of sugar and half a pint of water, place it upon the fire and ...
-838. Orange Ice Cream
Proceed precisely as in the last, but using the juice and rind of ten oranges instead of lemons as there directed. ...
-839. Apricot Ice Cream
Procure a dozen and a half of fine ripe apricots, which cut in halves, take out the stones, which break, extracting the kernels, which blanch in very hot water and skin, then put them with the apricot...
-840. Strawberry Ice Cream
Procure about two pounds of fine ripe strawberries, which pick and rub through a hair-sieve with a wooden spoon, obtaining all the juice and pulp of the strawberries, with which mix half a pound of po...
-841. Marmalade Of Apple
Peel and cut thirty apples in slices, taking out the cores, and, if for preserving, to every pound of fruit put three quarters of a pound of broken sugar (but, if for immediate use, half a pound would...
-842. Marmalade Of Apricots
Stone about eight pounds of ripe fleshy apricots, break the stones, and blanch and skin the kernels, which with the apricots put into a preserving-pan, add six pounds of sugar and place it over a shar...
-843. Quince Jam Puree
Procure a sieve of fine ripe quinces, which peel and cut in four, taking out the cores, place them in a large preserving-pan and cover with cold water; set upon the fire, and when boiling and tender t...
-844. Apricot Marmalade Jam
Procure a quantity of very ripe apricots, each of which cut into four or six pieces, break the stones and blanch the kernels, put the apricots in a preserving-pan with a small quantity of water, boil ...
-845. Marmalade Of Cherries
Procure a sieve of bright Kentish cherries, pull out the stalks and stones, and put the fruit in a preserving-pan, place over the fire, keeping it stirred until reduced to two-thirds ; have in another...
-846. Strawberry Jam
Pick twelve pounds of very red ripe strawberries, which put into a preserving-pan, with ten pounds of sugar (broken into smallish pieces), place over a sharp fire, keep continually stirring, boiling i...
-847. Raspberry Jam
Pick twelve pounds of raspberries, and pass them through a fine sieve to extract the seeds, boil as many pounds of sugar as you have pounds of fruit to the sixth degree (No. 831), when add the pulp of...
-848. Jelly Of Apple
Cut six dozen of sound rennet apples in quarters, take out all the pips, put them into a sugar-pan, just cover them with cold water, and place over the fire, let boil until the apples become quite pul...
-849. Jelly Of Quince
Proceed exactly as directed in the last, but using quinces instead of apples. ...
-850. Sweetmeat Of Currant Jelly
Put half a sieve of fine red currants in a large stewpan, with a gallon of white currants and a gallon of raspberries, add a quart of water, place over the fire, keep stirring, to prevent them stickin...
-852. Salad Of Oranges
Select four good oranges, the thinnest rind ones are preferable; cut them crosswise into slices double the thickness of a crown-piece, dress them round upon your dish, one piece resting half-way upon ...
-853. Salad Of Strawberries
Pick the stalks from a pottle of very fine strawberries, which put into a basin with half a teaspoonful of powdered cinnamon, two glasses of brandy, and an ounce of sifted sugar, toss them lightly ove...
-854. Salad Of Peaches
Procure four ripe peaches, which peel and cut into quarters; put them into a basin with two ounces of sugar and a glass of sherry, toss them lightly over, dress upon your dish and serve. Apricots, gre...
-855. Salad Of Currants And Raspberries
Put an equal quantity of each, making rather more than a pint, into a basin, with two ounces of powdered sugar-candy, and a little powdered cinnamon, toss them over lightly, and they are ready to serv...
-856. Pine Apples
I have tried several experiments with the West Indian pine-apples, many of which being rather stale when they arrive here, would make an unsightly appearance whole upon the table, but made into a comp...
-857. Cake Of Savoy In Mould
Have ready a large high mould lightly buttered (with a soft brush, and clarified butter), turn the mould up to drain, and when the butter is quite set throw some finely sifted sugar into it; move the ...
-858. Savoy Calces, Or Ladies' Fingers
Have the weight of nine eggs of sugar in a bowl, which put into a bain-marie of hot water, weigh the same weight of flour, which sift through a wire sieve upon paper, break the eggs into a bowl, and p...
-859. Sponge Cake
Put one pound of powdered sugar in a good-sized bowl, which stand in a bain-marie of hot water; sift one pound of flour upon a sheet of paper, then break twelve eggs into the bowl with the sugar, whic...
-860. Small Sponge Cakes
Put six whole eggs into an earthen pan with half a pound of sugar, upon which you have previously rubbed the rind of a lemon, stand the pan in very hot water, keeping its contents well mixed until bec...
-861. Pound Cakes
Put one pound of butter into an earthen pan with a pound of powdered sugar, and a little grated nutmeg, beat them well together with the hand until forming a smooth lightish cream, when add by degrees...
-862. Queen's Cakes
Weigh of butter the weight of six eggs, and nine of powdered sugar, which put together in an earthen pan, beat well with the hand until forming a smooth cream, when add by degrees nine eggs, and when ...
-863. Almond Cakes
Procure one pound of ground almonds, to which add two pounds of powdered sugar, mixing the whole with the whites of nine eggs, beating the mixture well with a wooden spoon for about ten minutes, lay t...
-864. Cocoa-Nut Biscuits
Scrape four cocoa nuts, to which add the same weight of powdered sugar, mix with whites of eggs, beating with a wooden spoon until forming a softish but thick paste ; lay the mixture out upon wafer-pa...
-865. Moss Biscuits
Weigh half a pound of flour, to which add an ounce and a half of butter and five ounces of sugar, rub them well together and mix with one whole and one white of egg and a teaspoonful of milk; then add...
-866. Rout Cakes
Procure one pound of ground almonds, to which add one pound of powdered sugar, mixing them together with yolks of eggs until forming a stiffish but flexible paste, when form it into small biscuits of ...
-867. Rout Biscuits
Boil a pound and a quarter of lump sugar, upon which you have rubbed the rind of a lemon, in half a pint of milk ; when cold, rub half a pound of butter with two pounds of flour, make a hole in the ce...
-868. Cream Biscuits
Rub one pound of fresh butter into one pound of flour, make a hole in the centre, into which put half a pound of powdered sugar upon which the rind of a lemon was rubbed previously to pounding, and th...
-869. Shrewsbury Cakes
Weigh one pound of flour, into which rub half a pound of butter and six ounces of flour, make a hole in the centre, into which break a couple of eggs, and add sufficient milk to form a flexible paste,...
-870. Macaroons
Blanch and skin half a pound of sweet almonds, dry them well in your screen, then put them into a mortar with a pound and a half of lump sugar, pound well together, and pass the whole through a wire s...
-871. Ratafias
Ratafias are made similar to the above, but deducting two ounces of sweet, and adding two ounces of bitter almonds; they are laid out in much smaller cakes upon common paper, and baked in a much warme...
-872. Italian Drops
Have a mixture similar to the above, merely a liqueur glassful of best noyeau, lay it in round drops upon paper, and bake in a hot oven without sifting any sugar over; when taken from the papers, dry ...
-873. St. James's Cake
Put one pound of very fresh butter in a good-sized kitchen basin, and with the right hand work it up well till it forms quite a white cream; then add one pound powdered sugar, mix well, add ten eggs b...
-Letter No. XVII. The Dinner-Table
My dear Eloise, - I thank you for your kind compliment, but I have always been of opinion that the arrangements and serving of a dinner-table, have as much to do with the happiness and pleasure of a p...
-Letter No. XVII. The Dinner-Table. Continued
As soon as I see that all are served, and words are few in consequence of the organ which utters them being employed in another way, I give a look to the two servants, which they understand, and immed...
-Letter No. XVIII
Dearest Eloise, - You are right in your remark, that there is a great difference as to the manner and way in which evening parties or soirees are given in different houses, although being frequented b...
-874. Lemonade
Peel six lemons free from pith, cut them up in small pieces, and put them with two cloves in a bottle, with half a pint of hot water, and place it in a bain-marie, or stewpan, with boiling water, and ...
-875. Cold Punch
Proceed as above for lemonade, but add one pint of capillaire to half a pint of lemon-juice, one pint of pale brandy, one pint of pale rum, one tablespoonful of arrack, and five quarts of cold water; ...
-876. Port Wine Negus
Take one quart of new port wine, of a fruity character, one tablespoonful of spirit of cloves, one teacupful of sugar, one lemon sliced, half a nutmeg grated, pour over these two quarts of boiling wat...
-877. White Wine Fillip
Take one bottle of sherry or Madeira, or champagne, or any other good white wine, a gill of noyeau or maraschino, the juice of half a lemon, add to it one quart of calf's foot jelly well sweetened and...
-878. Sandwiches
In making a large quantity, a stale quartern loaf should be taken and trimmed free from all crust, and cut into slices the eighth of an inch in thickness, slightly buttered, and then thin slices of me...
-Letter No. XIX
------------Farm, Essex, July - , 1849. My Dear Eloise, - You Are No Doubt Surprised At Receiving This From The Above Address, But You Remember When You Last Called I Thought My Little Emily Was Un...
-879. Clouted Cream
Strain the milk as soon as it comes from the cow into wide pans, holding about six quarts each, so as to be about three inches deep, and let it remain for twenty-four hours ; then gently place the pan...
-Conversation On Household Affairs
Mrs. R. After all the receipts and information which you have given me, there is one which you have not touched upon yet, which, perhaps, is of more importance than all the rest, it is the management ...
-Conversation On Household Affairs. Part 2
Mrs. L. - What you have described to me is all very well, yet I am certain, that if I go and try to do the same to-morrow, I shall not succeed ; how is it that you have everything in its place, and I ...
-Conversation On Household Affairs. Part 3
At present, though the number of our establishment is not greater, yet the style and manner of our living have changed. We dine alone, except when Mr. B. invites somebody to dine with him, which is m...
-Letter XXL
A New Aliment. Bifrons Villa. Here, dear Eloise, is an entirely new aliment, which has never yet been introduced into this country. A semi-epicure of our acquaintance, on returning from his visi...
-880. Cho-Ca
Scrape or grate it; put a pint of milk in a stewpan or chocolate-pot, and place it on the fire, with two ounces of sugar, boil it, put the Cho-ca in it, and stir it well for two minutes, and serve. ...
-On Carving
You reproach me for not having said a word about carving; I have not done so, as I think that is an accomplishment which our sex need not study, but at the same time it is well to know a little of it....
-Letter No. XXII. The Septuagenarian Epicure
My dear Eloise, - Having now arrived at the conclusion of our labors, during which you have in many instances thought me rather severe, and perhaps too exigeant in my remarks, especially about the sel...
-Illustrated Standard Poets
Halleck's Complete Poetical Works. Beautifully illustrated with fine Steel Engravings and a Portrait. 1 vol. 8vo., finest paper, cloth extra, gilt edges, $3 ; morocco extra, $5; morocco antique, $6. ...
-Cabinet Editions
Campbell's Complete Poetical Works. Illustrated with Steel Engravings and a Portrait. 16mo., cloth, $150; gilt edges, $225; morocco extra, $3. Butler's Hudibras, with Notes by Nash. Illustrated wit...
-Text Books For Learning The French, German, Italian, And Spanish Languages
I. French Collot's Dramatic French Reader. 12mo. &1. De Fiva's Elementary French Reader. 12mo. 50 cts. De Fiva's Classic French Reader for Advanced Students. 12mo. $1. Ollendorff's Element...
-Miniature Classical Library
Published in elegant form, with Frontispiece. Poetical Lacon ; or Aphorisms from the Poets. 38 cts. Bonds Golden Maxims. 31 cts. Clarke's Scripture Promises. Complete. 38 cts. Elizabeth ; or the Ex...
-Religious Works
Arnold's Rugby School Sermons - -$ 50 Anthon's Easy Catechism for Young Children - - 06 A Kempis. Of the Imitation of Christ......75 Burnet's History of the Reformation. Edited by Dr. Nares. ...
-Religious Works. Continued
Confidential Disclosures, Or Memoirs Of My Youth BY Alphonse De Lamart1ne, Author Of The History Of The Girondists, Etc. Translated from the French, By Eugene Plunkett. One volume ...
-Historical And Biographical Works
D. Appleton &. Co.'s Publications. Arnold, (Dr.) Early History of Rome. 2 vols. 8vo. - - -$5 00 Arnold, (Dr.) History of the Later Roman Commonwealth. 8VO....... 250 Arnold, (Dr.) Lectures on...
-Law Books
Anthon's Law Student ; or, Guides to the Study of the Law in its Principles. Holcombe's Digest of the Decisions of the Supreme Court of the U. S., from its Commencement to the present time. Large 8...
-Miscellaneous
Acton, or the Circle of Life. $1 25 Agnell's Book of Chess. A Complete Guide to the Game. Steel Illustrations. 12mo. - 1 50 Appletons' Library Manual; a valuable book of reference for the book buye...
-Science And Useful Arts
Ansted's Gold Seeker's Manual. 12mo. - . - - 25 Bourne's Catechism of the Steam Engine. 18mo. - 75 Bouissangault's Rural Economy - - - - - 1 50 Byrne's New Method of Calculating Logarithms. 1...









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