The Virtue of Good Soaking

If only the housewife learns the value of soaking various articles of food before preparing them for the table, how much better would be the results of her culinary arts. For instance, though she may soak bacon for twelve hours before boiling it, it is very seldom that she will subject poultry to the same treatment. Yet the oldest boiling fowl if duly soaked in cold water, will prove, when cooked, almost as tender as a young chicken and lose none of its flavor in the process. It is well to use for boiling the water in which the fowl has been soaked. The bird may, however, be steamed above the water instead of being actually boiled in it. This will increase the tenderness.

White Sauce

1 1/2 tablespoons flour

1  cup milk, scalded

2 tablespoons butter

1/4 teaspoon salt Pepper

Melt the butter and remove from the flame before it browns. Add the flour and cook until it bubbles. Pour on half the hot scalded milk and boil, adding the rest of the milk, salt and pepper. Use more flour if a thicker sauce is desired.

Egg Sauce

Beat two yolks and add 1/4 cup of white sauce. Stir well, then add the rest of the sauce and cook over a low flame until the sauce thickens. Use hot over vegetables.

White Sauce (for croquettes)

1/3 cup flour

2 1/2 tablespoons butter

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 cup milk

Melt the butter and remove from the flame before it browns. Add the flour and cook until it bubles. Pour on half the hot milk and then the rest of the milk, salt and pepper. Keep stirring to prevent lumps.

Mint Sauce for Lamb

1/3 cup chopped fresh mint

1 tablespoon powdered

sugar 1/2 cup vinegar

Dissolve the sugar in the vinegar. If the vinegar is strong, dilute with water. Pour over the mint into a saucepan and let stand over a very small flme for half an hour. Serve hot. Cold mint sauce may be made by bringing the mint leaves to a boil and then allow the whole sauce to cool before using.