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First Lessons In The Principles Of Cooking | by Lady Barker



The day has come in English social history when it is absolutely the bounden duty of every person at the head of a household - whether that household be large or small, rich or poor - to see that no waste is permitted in the preparation of food for the use of the family under his or her care. I am quite aware that such waste cannot be cured by theories, and that nothing except a practical acquaintance with the details of household management, supplemented by a conviction of the necessity of economy, can be expected to remedy the evil. At the same time, it is possible that ignorance of the fundamental principles of the chemical composition and of the relative nutritive value of the various sorts of food within our reach, added to the widespread ignorance of the most simple and wholesome modes of preparing such food, may be at the root of much of that waste.

TitleFirst Lessons In The Principles Of Cooking
AuthorLady Barker
PublisherRichard Clay And Sons
Year1886
Copyright1886, Macmillan And Co
AmazonFirst Lessons In The Principles Of Cooking

First Lessons In The Principles Of Cooking.

In Three Parts.

Lady Barker,

Author Of "Stories About," "A Christmas Cake,"

London: .

Macmillan And Co.

1886.

Richard Clay And Sons,

Bread Street Hill, London, E.C.

And At Bungay, Suffolk.

-Part I. The Chemical Composition, And The Effect Upon The Human Body Of The Various Substances Commonly Employed As Food
Introductory The day has come in English social history when it is absolutely the bounden duty of every person at the head of a household - whether that household be large or small, rich or poor - ...
-Lesson I. The Chemical Composition Of Our Food
The old German poet who wound up each verse of his famous drinking song by the assertion that four elements intimately mixed, form all nature and build up the world, was not so far wrong after all. ...
-Lesson II. Bread And Beef
Nature is always busy cooking inside us. She is ever separating, arranging, and making the best of the heterogeneous substances we give her to deal with, and it is as well to find out what materials a...
-Lesson III. Fish
In many parts of the coast of our sea-surrounded home, fish is, from necessity, the staple food of the inhabitants; and although whole districts in other parts of the world, such as Dacca, the Mediter...
-Lesson IV. Vegetables
I feel that I cannot begin this chapter better than by quoting what Dr. Letheby says on the subject: Primarily, all our foods are derived from the vegetable kingdom, for no animal has the physiolo...
-Part II. The Best Modes Of Preparing Some Sorts Of Food For Use, With A Simple Expla Nation Of Their Respective Actions
Remarks The very first principle of cooking is cleanliness. No skill or flavouring can make up for the lack of it, and if it be present, there is good hope of every other culinary virtue. But clean...
-Lesson V. The Preparations Of Flour Used As Food
It is well known that so far as actual nutritive power goes, both oats and barley, to say nothing of maize, rye, the millets, and rice, contain as much (oats, indeed, more) valuable material for the m...
-Lesson VI. Potatoes And Other Vegetables
Although it is rather a departure from the plan I pursued in the First Part to speak in this lesson about potatoes, it is natural to me to do it, because, so far as my practical experience - which was...
-Lesson VII. Modes Of Preparing Broth Or Soup From Beef
The reason I have placed this subject in a separate lesson is because of its enormous importance in the sick-room. More delicate children are reared into health and strength, and more lives are saved,...
-Lesson VIII. Fuel And Fire
The object of cooking is to render the flesh of animals and vegetable substances easier of mastication, and therefore easier of digestion. How this object is carried out in most English households let...
-Part III. The Principles Of Diet And A Few Cheap. And Easy Recipes
Remarks The first principle of diet is that the stomach should not be asked to receive more than it can digest ; and the second, that the food should be suitable to each person's digestion. We are ...
-Lesson IX. Boiling And Stewing
There is all the difference in the world between boiling meat which is to be eaten, and meat whose juices are to be extracted in the form of soup. If the meat is required as nourishment, of course you...
-Lesson X. Baking, Roasting, And Frying
The same principle which has been advocated in boiling holds good with regard to roasting. If you wish to retain all the juices in the meat, place it close to the fire for five minutes at first, and t...
-Lesson XL. Bacon
American bacon is considerably lower in price than English bacon, but it shrinks more when boiled, and you can get a larger number of slices from a given weight of English bacon than can be obtained f...
-Lesson XII. The Gist Of The Whole Matter
Now let us sum up what we have been trying to teach and to learn in this little book. To begin with, we will run through the first part, which is perhaps rather alarming on account of its hard words, ...
-The Gist Of The Whole Matter. Part 2
Well, then, to return to the purpose of this slender volume. If it even awakens a sense of ignorance in its readers, something will have been gained, for I am much mistaken in my knowledge of women of...
-The Gist Of The Whole Matter. Part 3
I have already alluded in another place (page 36) to the case of the domestic servant who has been a housemaid or a nursemaid, or waited on ladies, and who perhaps marries and finds herself in a nice ...









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