(Allium cepa, Linn.) To this family also belong leeks, garlic, chives and shallots. There are many varieties of onions, all more or less alike. The odor and the flavor are due to a volatile material, rich in sulphur, which is dissipated and thrown off by careless cooking. Onions, like other green vegetables, must be cooked in boiling salted water. Like cabbage and other vegetables containing sulphur, they must be cooked in an uncovered vessel. Onions are wholesome, and when well cooked are rather easy of digestion and are stimulating to the intestines.

To keep onions for winter use, place them in a light dry place, where there is not the slightest danger of freezing. They must, however, be kept cold, but freezing causes immediate decay.

Boiled Onions

Peel the onions, and after you think they are well peeled, remove another outside covering. Throw them into cold water for half an hour and then into a kettle of boiling salted water; boil in an uncovered vessel three-quarters of an hour, or until the onions are perfectly tender. Drain in a colander; return to the saucepan and put back over the fire to dry. Turn into an uncovered vegetable dish and pour over white sauce. If the onions are not thoroughly dry, the water will exude and dilute the sauce. Onions are usually served as an accompaniment to mock turkey or chicken, or any of the various nut dishes.

Boiled Spanish Onions

Peel one good-sized Spanish onion; cut it into slices a half inch thick; soak in cold water a half hour and cook according to the preceding recipe. The water in which onions are boiled may be saved for onion soup, sauce Soubise or vegetable stock.

Spanish Onions With Brown Sauce

1 large or 2 medium-sized Spanish onions

1 tablespoonful butter

1 tablespoonful flour

1 teaspoonful kitchen bouquet

1 teaspoonful salt

1 saltspoonful pepper

Peel the onions and cut into slices Ó half inch thick. Throw them into cold water for half an hour; then put into a kettle of boiling salted water and cook uncovered for three-quarters of an hour; drain, saving the water. Rub the butter and flour together; add a half pint of the water in which the onions have been boiled, stir until boiling; add the kitchen bouquet, the salt and pepper. Dish the onions, pour over the brown sauce, and serve.

Onion GlacÚ

6 medium-sized onions

4 tablespoonfuls olive oil

1 tablespoonful flour

1/2 pint vegetable stock

1 teaspoonful salt

1 saltspoonful pepper

1/4 nutmeg grated

Peel the onions and cut them in thin slices. Put the oil in a shallow frying-pan; when hot, add the onions. Shake until slightly brown. Take out with a skimmer, and put into a saucepan. Add the flour to the oil, the stock, salt, pepper and nutmeg. Stir until boiling and strain over the onions. Cover and simmer on the back part of the stove three-quarters of an hour. If it is in celery season, add also a half cup of chopped celery. These are nice to serve with beans or nut steaks.

Onions au Supreme

6 medium-sized onions, or 2 Spanish onions

2 tablespoonfuls butter

2 tablespoonfuls flour

4 tablespoonfuls cream

Yolks of two eggs

1/2 teaspoonful salt

1 saltspoonful pepper

Peel the onions carefully and cut them into slices a half inch thick; throw into a kettle of boiling salted water and cook without covering for thirty minutes; drain, saving the water. Rub together the butter and flour; add a half pint of the water in which the onions were boiled; stir until boiling and then add the salt and pepper. Take from the fire and add the yolks of the eggs beaten with the cream. Stir over the fire just a moment. Be careful or it will curdle. Dish the onions and pour over the sauce. Garnish the dish with triangular pieces of toast and send at once to the table.